This 600/1,000 grit is my second Unimi knife sharpener, the first is 2,000/6,000 grit and I love them both. Both stones together produce very sharp and well polished knives that reduce the cutting effort and save time in the kitchen. I particularly appreciate that the manufacture printed the grit number on the side of each stone - that helps use the different grits in the proper sequence from the coarser to the finer. The stone comes with a non-slip silicone/rubber base which is very handy.
You will also need at least one finer stone. Once the shape of an edge is established, successively finer grits are used to refine the edge improving the quality of the cut it delivers. A dull edge will not cut well and should be shaped with a coarse stone. An edge sharpened on a coarse stone will cut better than a dull one, but still won’t be ideal and should be improved with a finer stone. As you progress through finer stones, the cutting edge will continue to improve. How many and how fine these stones need to be varies depending on how fine an edge you require.

Clamp-style sharpening tools use a clamp with several holes with predefined angles. The stone is mounted on a rod and is pulled through these holes, so that the angle remains consistent. Another system is the crock stick setup, where two sticks are put into a plastic or wooden base to form a V shape. When the knife is pulled up the V, the angle is held so long as the blade is held perpendicular to the base. Several cutlery manufacturers now offer electric knife sharpeners with multiple stages with at least one grinding stage. These electric sharpeners are typically used in the kitchen but have the ability to sharpen blades such as pocket or tactical knives. The main benefit of using an electric sharpener is speed with many models that can complete the sharpening process in one to two minutes. The disadvantage is that the sharpening angle is fixed so some specialized knives, like a Japanese style Santoku, may need additional attention to sharpen to the ideal angle.

1. Diamond Stones. I’ve used two, many years ago, to sharpen steel knives & found that the diamond coating wore away. They did work well at first, but then I was sharpening on the backing material. This puzzled me, because diamond is harder than steel, but have only recently read that the diamond particles are torn off the backing material because they stick to the softer steel. Diamond stones are recommended for sharpening ceramic knives only. This info about diamond stones & steel knives I got from an Edge-Pro article.
The sharpener has come a long way in the past couple of thousand years and yet it hasn’t. That is, while there have been incredible advances in the development of mechanical knife sharpeners the classic and very ancient sharpening stone is still with us and very much in use as you read this. The best knife sharpener for you will be one that meets the needs of your cuisine and your temperament but which, first and foremost, reliably produces the sharp knives (look after your knife!) you need with the least hassle.
Cost – While you can get a perfectly serviceable sharpening stick or stone sharpener for short money and some very high-quality tabletop manual 2 and 3-stage sharpeners for less than $50, high-quality mechanical systems will often run you $200 or even more. While that’s not so much money it’s likely to impact the quality of your life it is a lot to pay to keep a decent edge on your knives. While how much you ultimately pay for a sharpener is entirely up to you, you may want to consider your commitment to cooking and how often you are actually liable to use the device. If this is your first sharpener you might also want to consider learning how to sharpen a blade using a classic stick or stone sharpener first, before deciding if moving up to a mechanical sharpener is the right thing for you.
This wedge ends up short of a "point" to a much larger degree than the picture would indicate. The metal stops short, but then there is black non-slide "tape" applied to one side, and white "slide" tape applied to the other side, which makes the wedge even thicker than it appears in the photo, which means that in practice the end of wedge is even more truncated. So I have a hard time supporting my knives accurately on this wedge while sliding them down into contact with my stones. Prior to buying this wedge I just used a wooden wedge I cut off of a 3" by 3" post using a miter saw, said wedgewhich has a much less truncated end. That wooden wedge unfortunately absorbs water from my Japanese Waterstones. But I will try spraying polyurethane on that wooden wedge to help waterproof itand try again. If that doesn't work I will try to find a 3" by 3" plastic trim board somewhere and cut a wedge off the end of that. Note that you can buy 20 degree plastic wedges, but this is the first one I have found that does 15 degrees (nominal.) Note that Amazon also has the Blue AngleGuide set of wedges, but they are very small https://www.amazon.com/Angle-Guides-Sharpening-Knife-Stone/dp/B01N4QMO7U/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1499301705&sr=8-4&keywords=sharpening+angle+guide
A: That depends almost entirely on how often you use them. If you are a professional chef who uses his or her knives every day then you should hone them every time you use your knives. But honing has its limits and over time your edge is going to become dull no matter what. Therefore your knives will need to be sharpened at least several times a year. Some chefs, in fact, will use a whetstone on an almost daily basis in order to ensure their knives are always razor sharp. Most of us, however, are not professional chefs and may not even touch our kitchen knives for days at a time. In that case, it’s probably a good idea to hone the edge after every couple of uses and have your knives sharpened once a year.

I recommend it as a lightweight alternative to larger stone for smaller knives. Leather necklace is comfortable and seems strong. I conditioned it for suppleness and swim with it on tightened as a choker. Stone is small, dog-tag size. I use it with water. Functional for small folder knives and multi-tools. Not useful for large fixed blades, since you can't make a long stroke. Small to grip. I use double-sided tape on one side to keep it in place on a flat rock. Not sure of grit, seems like around 1000. It took a while, but i got my old boy scout knife sharp.
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