I really liked this whetstone! I had a Smith's pocket sharpener that could get my knife sharp enough for working around in the yard (I have an Opinel no.8). However, in doing a little research I found that the sharpener was only around 600 grit on the finest setting. So this BearMoo 1000/4000 grit looked like the perfect step up, and it turned out to be the perfect stone for me. The pictures are an accurate representation of what you get. The removable rubber base was helpful when switching from one side to the next, and it kept the stone from sliding around. The instructions say that the stone can work with either water or oil, but that water is preferred. It said to leave the stone soaking in water for five minutes, and the stone worked like a champ. I especially liked how the instructions gave you an approximate time of how long the stone takes to sharpen a knife -- it just helped give me an idea that it would take about 15-20 minutes on the 1000 grit side, and then another 10-15 minutes on the 4000 grit. Just turn on a TV show!

Speaking of building muscle memory, here is a good exercise for you, a confidence builder: Paint the edge of your knife and bevel with a Sharpie and sharpen the knife at an angle that results in the removal of that Sharpie. In many cases it will be close to the 20 deg angle anyway. When you have achieved success, repeat the process and do that ten times. Now flip the blade over and do it on the other side, you don’t need to use much pressure here, just a little. You want to get to the point where you can place the knife at the SRA “Sharpie Removal Angle” the first time, every time.
A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 
A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.

If you wish, further polish or even strop the edge to the desired sharpness. This makes the edge better suited for "push cutting" (cutting directly into materials, pushing straight down without sliding the blade across the object) but generally impairs slicing ability: without the "microscopic serrations" left by grinding with a stone, the blade tends to not bite into things like tomato skins.


Ease of use – Most people in search of a mechanical sharpener want one because they don’t want to be bothered with trying to achieve a perfect edge themselves using a stick or sharpening stone. They want predictable, first class results every time. In that case it’s important that the electric powered device is easy to use, achieves results quickly and with little effort and is designed with user safety in mind. Keep in mind too that it’s easy to apply too much pressure when using a mechanical sharpener and when that happens you’re likely to see unsatisfactory results. In addition there are subtle differences between mechanical devices designed for Asian-style knives and those designed for Western-style knives. This has to do with the sharpening angle discussed above. Don’t get an Asian sharpener if you don’t need precise control over your cuts.
The stone – With a sharpening stone, the process is essentially the same as with the stick sharpener. The only difference is that you don’t hold the stone, you place it into its own holder (If it comes with one. If it doesn’t you’ll need to improvise) on a flat surface. Push the knife down the stone several times while holding it at a shallow angle and then flip it and pull it toward you several times to get the other side of the blade.
Whichever method you choose, be it a waterstone (also known as a whetstone), or a pull-through (either V-shaped or ceramic wheels) it's important to regularly hone your knife with a honing steel, which we'll also cover below. You'll be pleased to hear that you won't have to reach for the stones too regularly – once every two or three months should suffice. 
Ceramic sharpening stones were the early replacement for natural stones. Unfortunately there are huge differences in the quality of ceramic stones so be wary. Some are extremely soft and dish out very quickly and at the other end of the spectrum some are so hard they tend to glaze over in a hurry. Ceramic stones need a good soaking for about 10 or more minutes to saturate the pores of the stone prior to use. As all knife steels are different we tend to find that ceramic stones tend to work better with some knives over others. There are no hard and fast rules but we like ceramic for Ao-ko and single edged knives. The Kaiden Ceramic stones are the fastest cutting Japanese stones in Australia and are recommended for advanced users.
We have been helping customers find the right sharpeners for more than a decade. Selecting a sharpener can be difficult if you're not sure what you need. Our staff is trained to listen to your needs and to help you find the right sharpener the first time. We understand that it may be your first time sharpening, so we're available to help you if you have questions. Even if you're already a sharpening professional, our staff is available to answer your tough questions. We use what we sell, so you can be assured that when you purchase from us, we're able to help you with your sharpener.
The fit and finish on this product is amazing. He stone is beautiful and clearly high quality and very well cut. It’s different features on even such a small stone are huge. The leather cord and it’s unique knot is incredible. This is absolutely part of my edc, something I am happy to wear all the time. It’s useful and looks great too. Couldn’t be more happy with it.
first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg

If you want the highest quality knife blade you need to learn how to use a whetsone, the most effective Japanese way of sharpening knives is to maintain their edge crisp and sharp. Today only, get this audio bestseller for a special price. Whetstone will not only teach you the basics of knife sharpening, but also an essential range of other essential skills. You will learn how to thin old knives to renew them and make them as good as new. You will also learn how to create a knife sharpening plan that will have you sharpening knives like a professional Here Is A Preview Of What You'll Learn... The Basics of Knife Sharpening Types of Sharpening Stones A Brief Word About Grits About Whetstone Sharpening Stone How Often Should You Sharpen Your Knives? Developing Your Knife Sharpening Skills Using the Correct Angle Applying the Right Pressure Level Thinning a Knife And much, much more! Download your copy today! Take action today and download this audiobook now at a special price!
The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.
Your immediate goal is to raise a burr on the side of knife opposite to the side you are sharpening and depending on the steel, the grit of stone and how you are doing, it will be either a very quick process or it will seem like it takes an eternity. Patience here will reward you, believe me. The sharpening process is incomplete with no burr creation on your first stone. (Yes, it is possible to stop at that magic moment without the burr forming but we are not there yet, we don’t even need to go there, ever, I am just mentioning it so those gifted sharpeners will be happy) . Think of the burr as the debris that is making the knife dull being forced down the blade towards the edge and over to the other side of the by your sharpening prowess. You form the burr, that knife will get sharp, no burr, you just need to look at your work. A Loupe is handy here, an inexpensive magnifying device with a light that allows you to see the edge very well, if you are not forming a burr, you are not reaching the edge. (Having a loupe also makes you look cool and scientific, like a Sharpologist).
100% Brand NewA fine-grained whetstone lubricated with oil, used for fine sharpening.The Ruby sharpening stone and Agate Stone,For Polishing,Sharpening.Can Make Mirror surface, mirror finish.The Ruby Sharpening stone is made from sintered crystals of synthetic ruby.It’s extremely hard, maintain their shape well and are resistant to wear.Size:50*25*10mm(1.97*0.98*0.39 inch)Model:3000 & 10,000 GritColor: red & whiteMainly used in industrial instrumentation, precision parts, miniature knives, stones, measuring tools, cutting tools, instruments, carbide, etc.Package included:1x Two Sides Jade SharpenerNote:Light shooting and different displays may cause the color of the item in the picture a little different from the real thing. The measurement allowed error i.
Choose the style of stone. You'll need to choose a natural or synthetic stone that can be used wet (soaked in water), with oil, or dry. There are also diamond stones that are actually very small diamonds attached to a metal surface. Stones that are soaked in water are softer stones which means you can quickly sharpen your knives. Unfortunately, these stones will wear down faster than the others. Oil stones are the least expensive and they're made of a harder material.[2]
The whetstone is the most popular for sharpening pocket knives (or knives). But, before  you go into the sharpening, you must prepare the whetstone beforehand.  Don't worry, it's quite easy. The majority used can be done by dipping the stone in water for about 15 minutes. Regardless of what type of whetstone you use, never use it while it's dry. It's important for a clean sharpening. Using mineral oil is another way to prepare a whetstone. It'll absorb into it once you begin putting the right amount on the surface. How you will determine how much to put is to ensure a "thick film" is lathered across the entire surface. This is critical when you learn how to sharpen a pocket knife.
I can personally verify that this will get your knives very sharp. I will spare you all the gory details, but the picture is of the instructions the ER sent me home with after stopping the bleeding and patching me up. I have to say, that’s not what I had in mind regarding “Thanksgiving tips”. So: not only will knives slide easily through spinach, but they will go through finger and fingernail like a hot knife through butter after being sharpened by this whetstone. Very clean, straight cut. Impressive, really. Just take it slow and don’t be a moron like me. 

A: Like cars, knife sharpeners run the gamut from basic to luxury and like cars the price can vary from extremely affordable to more than some people might want to spend. You can get a high quality sharpener that will put your knives through a 2 or 3-stage process which will result in an incredibly sharp edge for less than $20. Or you can buy a mechanical sharpener that will produce a virtually flawless edge for $200+.
To take off the fine scratches and burrs left by coarser stones, and to polish the surface, you can use stones starting at around 2000 grit. There is theoretically no upper limit, but stones above about 10000 grit achieve practically no measurable improvement in the edge. It is also interesting to note that above 8000 grit, there is no Japanese measurement standard. For stones labelled as having a finer grit, you simply have to take the manufacturer's word for it.
The stick – With a stick sharpener hold the sharpener in front of you (facing away from you) with one hand and the handle in the other hand. Hold the base of the knife against the base of the tip at a slight angle and then push the blade along the stick pulling it across the stick at the same time. The tip of the blade should cross the end of the stick. To sharpen the other side of the blade place it under the stick and repeat the process making sure to reverse the angle at which you are holding the knife against the stick.
One more thing to consider before you proceed is if you would like to sharpen your knife freehand or use a guide such as the DMT Sharpening Guide. Your skill and experience in sharpening will help you decide on the method that's best for you. If you are experienced and comfortable with freehand sharpening, a knife guide may be unnecessary. On the other hand, a knife sharpening guide is an inexpensive and easy way to keep the angle consistent. If you have tried to sharpen before but never achieved the proper edge, we recommend using the sharpening guide. The guide can solve common mistakes in the sharpening process. If you choose to use a guide, please read our how-to for using the knife sharpening guide.

Prior to using any kind of sharpening stone, it is advised that individuals soak the sharpening stone in light machine oil or household oil for at least 12 hours before being used. Before being used, it is advisable to wipe the surface of the sharpening stone to get rid of grime, grit or dirt that may have accumulated overtime during the time of storage.


We regret that due to technical challenges caused by new regulations in Europe, we can for the time being no longer accept orders from the European Union. If you reside in the UK you can continue to order from our UK websites or shop from our locations and partners. Visit West Elm at www.westelm.co.uk and Pottery Barn Kids at www.potterybarnkids.co.uk.
Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.

This flattening stone has a rubber base for a firm grip while sharpening your pocket knife. Sharpening and smoothing your knives' edges are done on the Grit 1000 side. Use the Grit 400 side, your blades will be back to it's fine glory of it's original shape. Both sides of this premium whetstone are perfectly ideal for those short blades like the pocket knives. The benefits are in the precise sharpened blade you'll get from using this premium whetstone with patience. The details are the result of it. You may want to get some mesh gloves too. It's a good idea to use gloves while sharpening your pocket knives as many reviewers of it have recommended.
Hold your knife at approximately 20° in relation to the honing rod. Your angle doesn't need to be exact, just approximate. Whatever angle you decide to choose, or unwittingly end up choosing, make sure to maintain the same angle throughout the honing process. Changing the angle used during the honing process won't smooth out the metal in the blade as much as using a consistent angle will.[4]

Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.


In addition, there are three broad grades of Japanese Water Stones consisting of the Ara-to (rough stone), the Naka-to (middle/medium stone) and, the Shiage-to (finishing stone). However, it should be noted that the various grades of natural Japanese Water Stones vary widely in both density and grit size from stone to stone and thus, they do not translate well to American or European abrasive standards. Furthermore, because they are significantly softer than Novaculite, Japanese Water Stones must be flattened more often and do not last as long as a either Novaculite or Coticule stones. But, because they form a slurry of fine particles when used, they also do a superior job of both cutting and polishing.
The height of the spine of your knife off of the stone below it will determine the angle. A typical sharpening angle for a typical chef knife is 19 or 20 degrees per side. For the sake of removing confusing obstacles that could hinder your progress, let’s just sharpen your knife at 20 degrees per side. You can determine exactly how high off the stone that knife should be held by measuring the height of your blade at the heel and then dividing that number by 3 for a 20 deg angle.

As you apply pressure in one direction you release pressure in the opposite direction. So apply pressure with your finger tips as you push the knife from one end of the stone to the other and release as you pull it back. You could actually lift the knife off of the stone but don’t do this, keep that angle stable. Sharpening becomes this repetitive motion with the first step being the raising of the burr on both sides of the knife from heel to tip.
The speed and polishing ability of waterstones attract many sharpeners. Waterstones sharpen quickly and are available in fine polishing grits not found in other stone types. The ability to flatten the stones is a necessity when sharpening with waterstones, so a starting set should include a flattening stone of some kind. Our article, How to Flatten a Waterstone, has more information about keeping waterstones flat.
if you have regular kitchen knives it will not work- first its to deep and the blade does not stick out, not dinner knives but cooking knives. of all the knives i put in it only 1 was wide enough to stick out. the device does not hold the blades. all the blades tested fell out of it, even a hunting knife, maybe its for 1 type of knife and they are selling it as the must have tool for all.. that said sell something useless for a few bucks that most cant use, they got a few bucks that most will blow off and not worry about a refund.. DONT WASTE YOUR MONEY.
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.

The most important aspect of a sharpening stone is the grit. If you have knives that have taken a beating and are either nicked up or really dull, you’ll need a courser stone to get it back into shape. And in order to put an exceptionally sharp edge on an already sharp knife, you’ll need a finer grit stone. If your knives are already in pretty good shape and just need a touch up, buying just a finer grit stone might be enough, but don’t think you can get away without a courser stone for knives that need more TLC. It is possible to buy a combination, or two-sided sharpening stone.
Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.
Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.

Now to finish: Again with P1 pressure, trailing strokes only, this time lift the blade off the stone as you finish pushing it over the stone away from you, bring it back and repeat this 5 times, on each side. The burr should be gone and your knife will be sharp, remember, manage your expectations but if you have followed this, that knife is going to be sharper than when you started and this is just the beginning. Now you can test your knife for sharpness trying to cut some telephone book paper.


As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.

Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.
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Cutting angle – With a manual stick or sharpening stone you set the angle yourself so this does not factor into the equation when choosing that type of sharpener. When shopping for an electric sharpener however it does. You’ll want to decide if you want your knives to have the 15 degree “Asian” style angle so that you can make precise cuts or the Western standard 20 degrees or 22-degree sharpening angle. Most people will opt for the 20 or 22-degree angle simply because their cuisine doesn’t call for a lot of finesse from their knives and those knives are probably of a heavier Western variety anyway.
Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.
You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
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