If I thought that the 12-inch option of the Messermeister rod was a little longer than necessary you must be wondering why I would include this Winware rod which is only available in a 12-inch option and a 14-inch option. I stand by my opinions and will confidently say here that I would not select either of these rods on the sole basis of their extreme lengths. That being said, many other consumers have selected these sharpeners, despite (or maybe because of) their length and have reported being very satisfied with the results they have achieved.
A diamond plate is a steel plate, sometimes mounted on a plastic or resin base, coated with diamond grit, an abrasive that will grind metal. When they are mounted they are sometimes known as diamond stones.[12] The plate may have a series of holes cut in it that capture the swarf cast off as grinding takes place, and cuts costs by reducing the amount of abrasive surface area on each plate. Diamond plates can serve many purposes including sharpening steel tools, and for maintaining the flatness of man-made waterstones, which can become grooved or hollowed in use. Truing (flattening a stone whose shape has been changed as it wears away) is widely considered essential to the sharpening process but some hand sharpening techniques utilise the high points of a non-true stone. As the only part of a diamond plate to wear away is a very thin coating of grit and adhesive, and in a good diamond plate this wear is minimal due to diamond's hardness, a diamond plate retains its flatness. Rubbing the diamond plate on a whetstone to true (flatten) the whetstone is a modern alternative to more traditional truing methods.[13]
Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
When sharpening a knife, you're actually grinding away the existing blade to create a new edge. This is evidenced by the fact that upon completion, you can find tiny metal filings, called swarf, when wiping down the stone. Because the metal blade is actually being ground away, a high importance is placed on the technique and consistency of drawing a knife over the stone.
But Joe has a quick, drop-dead simple approach that he’s been teaching to amateurs to learn how to sharpen a knife. You’ll only need a couple of inexpensive sharpening tools and a bit of practice. Master it and you’ll be amazed at how well your knives perform and how much more fun food prep, carving, slicing and peeling can be. Or at least how much less painful. Read on to learn how to sharpen a knife.

A hybrid manual-electric sharpener, the Chef’sChoice Hybrid 210 uses a motor and abrasive wheels to grind the new edge and employs a manual stage to hone it. This sharpener is eminently affordable. However, our top pick, the ProntoPro 4643 multi-blade-angle manual model (as well as its $30 to $40 single-blade-angle kin) produces a better edge and doesn’t make us worry about breakdowns the way the Hybrid 210’s lightweight motor does.


Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
A steel is the shorthand term for a steel rod used to straighten knife edges. Any decent knife set includes one, but few people know exactly what it does, much less how to properly use it. If you don’t have a steel, go buy one for about $20. Joe will show you how to use it to maintain a sharp edge. Don’t waste your money getting a diamond-coated surface. You don’t need it to know how to sharpen a knife.
Although there are many ways to sharpen your kitchen knives, we believe that using a sharpening stone is the absolute best way to go about it. Not only will you get the best results, you won’t assume as much risk of damaging the blade as you would using a manual or electric knife sharpener. The problem for most home cooks, however, is finding the best sharpening stone and learning how to use it. I’m not going to pretend it’s as easy as purchasing a stone and digging right in.
Start off on the rough grit side of the stone. Check the grit on your stone, or the packaging that came with the stone, to identify which is which. In general, whetstones and diamond stones each have different grits on either side. The rough grit side is used to grind the steel down, while the fine grit side is used to sharpen or hone the knife. The grinding process comes first, so you start on the rough grit side.
Okay, that’s not the only reason. This particular rod has received substantially more positive consumer reviews than all of the others. I suppose that the majority of people agree with me, then. It is difficult to turn down a rod which outperforms the others, though. This Wusthof rod has been specially designed to not only straighten your blade but also to give it a quick sand to keep it sharp for even longer than the typical honing rod.

The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.

With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
Everyone who owns a knife needs a sharpener. Even the highest-quality knife will lose its edge over time and with use. The metal wears away on the cutting board, it chips on animal bones and bends on tough root vegetables, and it dissolves in the acids and salts of the kitchen. A dull knife is a dangerous knife. To keep it safe, and to keep a knife working, you need to sharpen it regularly.
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.
The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
It takes time to sharpen a knife correctly. I spent about 30 minutes on an already fairly sharp knife. I then spent two more sessions of about 10 to 15 minutes each. I took it a bit further with a 6000 grit stone and this puts a nice polish on it. Instead of cutting through an onion, it glides or slips through it. It was truly shocking to me to use a really sharp knife. It may take a bit of time to get it right the first time, since this was my first time with a water stone, but it was well worth the effort. I have been trying to figure out the best way to get a really sharp knife.

Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular strokes up and down across the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and the stone. You will notice a burr becomes visible after five or so strokes. Mentally divide the blade into three parts if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.
I purchased this set together with the 400/1000 grit stone assuming that some of my knives were quite dull and would need work on a coarse grit stone. Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 | Knife Sharpener Waterstone with NonSlip Rubber Base & Flattening Stone. This is my first wetstone. First off I tried to sharpen my Chicago Cutlery boning knife. This knife is nearly thirty years old, has been abused in may ways and was quite dull. It was very difficult for me to get a burr on this blade, which I attribute to poor technique. Next I moved on to my Henckels Professional S paring and chef's knives. The paring knife was moderately sharp and was modestly improved after working over all three grits of stone. It would cut paper but again it was difficult to develop a burr with this blade. Undaunted I switched to the chef's knife. This knife is twenty years old and has never been professionally re-sharpened. I have sharpened it twice with a Lanksey sharpening system which marred the finish but did put a good edge on the blade. Lansky Standard Coarse Sharpening System with Fine Hones. The chef's knife was moderately dull and had several pits visible on the cutting surface. I modified my technique for passing the knife over the stone and worked the chef's knife over the 400 grit stone aggressively and eventually I was able to get a burr to form from the tip of the knife all the way to the handle. From there it was a simple process of reforming the burr on the 1000 grit stone and then finishing on the 6000. After sharpening, the chef's knife easily and cleanly slices a tomato with very light pressure and is in my opinion very sharp. Not sushi knife sharp but more than enough for the chopping and slicing I expect of it. I'm looking forward to going back and working both the boning knife and the paring knife over again. Don't expect a good result from this product the first time you use it. Watch videos on using a wetstone, expect to spend at least twenty minutes per knife at first, and practice forming a burr. If you can form a burr, you will be able to successfully sharpen your knife.
Sugimoto Hamono Western kitchen knives are made from carbon steel or special alloy steel. Although carbon steel knives cut well and are easy to sharpen, they rust easily. Carbon steel knives are also discolored by some foods, but this is not a problem with special alloy steel knives. The Western-style kitchen knife is often referred to as a “general-purpose knife” and is widely used.
Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.
Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.
The days of visiting the knife sharpener are gone. It is rare that you will see a knife sharpening truck roaming the streets, dinging its bell, on a search for customers. Those days are gone because newer, easier methods of sharpening knives have been developed. You no longer need to know special techniques and methods to properly sharpen a knife. You don’t need to worry about holding your knife at the perfect angle to get a nice straight edge.

Manual sharpeners are, in my opinion, the best way to sharpen your knives. They are my personal favorite, because they allow you to sharpen your blades with precision. Unlike electric sharpeners which can take off layers of steel so quickly you barely see it happen, you maintain control over the sharpening process with a manual sharpener. You can put one pass through, then check your edge. You can do another pass or two, then check it again.
Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
A hybrid manual-electric sharpener, the Chef’sChoice Hybrid 210 uses a motor and abrasive wheels to grind the new edge and employs a manual stage to hone it. This sharpener is eminently affordable. However, our top pick, the ProntoPro 4643 multi-blade-angle manual model (as well as its $30 to $40 single-blade-angle kin) produces a better edge and doesn’t make us worry about breakdowns the way the Hybrid 210’s lightweight motor does.
1. Start off with the rough grit. If you have a particularly dull blade, start off with the rough grit side of your sharpening stone. How do you tell which side is the rough grit? Sometimes you can tell by sight. If you can’t do that, do a thumbnail test. Scratch the surface with your thumbnail and whichever side feels rougher, that’s the side you want to start off with. Also, rough grits tend to be more porous than finer grits. So if you put water on one side and the stone really drinks it up, chances are it’s the rough grit.
Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.
Consumers have stated that a lot of metal is removed from the blade if you use all three stages. Usually, however, it is completely unnecessary to use all three stages. Most of the time you can easily get away with only using the fine grit and the honing discs to sharpen your knives. You can even use the honing discs on their own to keep your blades straight. The first stage (the rough grit) will only be necessary for sharpening extremely dull or damaged blades. Upon completing this stage, you will often find that you can skip right over to honing.

Manufacturer contacted and sent a new one for replacement. Great customer service but replacement item was nicked on the corner. It was still usable so i didn't bother to ask for another replacement. I would recommend item to be shipped in another box instead of an over-sized yellow envelop which is not adequate protection. Item sharpen my knife pretty good though..
You will also need at least one finer stone. Once the shape of an edge is established, successively finer grits are used to refine the edge improving the quality of the cut it delivers. A dull edge will not cut well and should be shaped with a coarse stone. An edge sharpened on a coarse stone will cut better than a dull one, but still won’t be ideal and should be improved with a finer stone. As you progress through finer stones, the cutting edge will continue to improve. How many and how fine these stones need to be varies depending on how fine an edge you require.
The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
The days of visiting the knife sharpener are gone. It is rare that you will see a knife sharpening truck roaming the streets, dinging its bell, on a search for customers. Those days are gone because newer, easier methods of sharpening knives have been developed. You no longer need to know special techniques and methods to properly sharpen a knife. You don’t need to worry about holding your knife at the perfect angle to get a nice straight edge.
Unlike our Top Choice for this category, most rods are actually made only to hone your blade, not to sharpen it as well. To hone something means to straighten it. The very thin cutting edge of any blade will become warped over time. It will not be visible to the naked eye, but it will be warped. Tiny folds and grooves will find their way to your blade’s edge, making it seem as if it is growing dull. Using a honing rod, you can push those folds back into place and create a straighter, stronger, sharper blade. Of course, this will only work for so long, as your blade will eventually grow dull in other ways.
Its main disadvantage is cost: At about $120, the flagship stainless steel Professional model sits in an uncomfortable middle ground between our main pick and our upgrade pick. That said, an otherwise identical Classic model made of black plastic is generally closer to the price of our main pick. A lesser point, but an important one, is that this design is not completely foolproof, as our other picks are. You have to pay attention and use a steady hand and pressure to get a straight edge. Not hard—but you may need a little practice to master the process.
Our test of the Brød & Taylor turned a dull blade into one that effortlessly and cleanly sliced both tomatoes and paper. Due to the reputation of V-notch carbide sharpeners, however, I was concerned about the durability of the edge, so I did an additional test: I used the Brød & Taylor to sharpen my old pocketknife, which uses 440C steel, one of the earliest knife-worthy stainless alloys and one that more refined alloys have since surpassed. I then made 50 slices through a cardboard box, rehoned and repolished the knife (but did not resharpen it), and made 50 more slices. After all that, I was still able to slice a tomato and peel an apple without problem. That’s impressive: Cardboard is so tough on blade edges that knifesmiths use it as a kind of stress test.
Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your
Some of the videos I watched suggested soaking the stone for 12-15 minutes prior to use. One suggested using vegetable oil on the surface versus water/soaking (I used water and presoaking it for 15-minutes). So instead of a simple 'out-of-the-box-and-use' approach, it required a bit of research before sharpening a knife. Otherwise I would have given this product a 5-star rating. 

The knives sharpening system is multifunctional. It has three slots for ceramic knives, dull metal knives and a slot for finishing and polishing the edges. It is very safe to use. Hence, no need to worry about accidents or to damage your blades in the process of sharpening. The base is non-slip in nature due to the heavy duty non-slip rubber used. This provides extra grip thus boosting its safety. The main body is light and yet durable at the same time.
We used the honing rods on multiple knives, including our top pick for chef’s knives, the 8-inch Mac MTH-80—a hard Japanese blade—and a vintage 12-inch Wüsthof, a German knife with a softer blade. That covers the two main types of knives that people commonly own. To dull the knives between tests, we repeatedly sawed through 1-inch-thick hemp rope, a classic challenge used by knifemakers to demonstrate their blades’ durability. We focused on 12-inch rods, because a longer rod is easier to use—it offers more room to sweep the length of a standard 8- or 10-inch chef’s knife.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener is a handheld device, which is optimized to handle various sharpening jobs. It comes with a belt sander, which spins around following a triangular configuration. It has a set of angles on either side, which can be adjusted from 15 to 30 degrees, depending on your sharpening needs. Unlike other electric knife sharpeners, which tend to overheat during high speeds, the speed of this one is adjustable.
If you don't want to learn the skill of sharpening on a stone, a pull through sharpener may be a good option. The pull through sharpener consists of one or more smalle grinding wheels with a fine or coarse grit. In order to sharpen the knife you pull the knife several times through the grinding wheels without really pushing. The results of this shaprening method are of lower quality than sharpening rods and stones. The result is a relatively jagged edge, and the sharpness is of short duration. To get really sharp knives, it is therefore advisable to use one or more sharpening stones. The fast and somewhat rough treatment of a pull through sharpener is, in particular for harder steels, not recommended. A good knife actually deserves a more sophisticated sharpening method, such as sharpening on a stone.
Item arrived on time and in good working order. I got this as a gift for a friend that has a high end set of kitchen knives and needs a simple way to sharpen them. Slight learning curve but worth it in the end. The item is actually Japanese, with almost no English on it and everything written in Kanji. Watch some youtube videos on how to use this dual sided stone. I got the item on sale and it was a bargain, excellent value for the money. I highly recommend this product.
Why spend hundreds of dollars on a knife sharpening machine when you can get your knives razor sharp for the price of a cheap necktie? It won’t take more than a few practice sessions to learn how to get your knives professionally sharp with the Lansky 8” Ceramic Sharp Stick. This device is simplicity incarnate and yet it does the job of electric sharpeners costing many times more.
Most professional knife makers mainly use flexible belts, when putting a razor sharp edge on the blades. You can now use the same technology at home to sharpen your knives, every time they become dull. You might have other sharpening tools and methods at home. However, it is quite hard to find one that does the job better and faster than the Work Sharp WSKTS-KT Knife sharpener.
Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close

Once you’ve decided to start sharpening your kitchen knives with a sharpening stone, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to actually get going. These steps include finding and buying the best sharpening stone for use at home, learning the basic technique involved in doing the sharpening, and then practicing enough times to get it right. (For the sake of the knives, we don’t recommend using your best kitchen knives for practice!)

"Sharpening is like a hangover cure," says Laurie Timpson, founder of Savernake Knives in Wiltshire. "If there was a cure and you knew about it, I'd stay at your house, crash on your sofa and have whatever it was when I woke up. Everyone would have it and there'd be no discussion. Everybody says they've created a perfect sharpening technique, and they haven't." 
Most sharpening stones are made of aluminum oxide, Novaculite, and silicon carbide. They are commonly known as India, Arkansas and Crystolon stones. Crystolon and India are man made while Arkansas stones are natural. Arkansas stones have a fine to coarse texture while India stones are preferred for fine sharpening. Crystolon are mainly used for initial coarse sharpening. Some sharpening stones are mixed with diamond abrasives to produce the optimal cutting edge.
For woodworking tools like chisels and plane blades, you will need stones that are at least as wide as the blades themselves. Length is helpful but not always critically important. The one exception is when you're using a guide for sharpening tools. The guide often rides on the stone and longer stones permit you to use a much larger portion of the stone as both the guide and the edge need to simultaneously touch the stones.
In summary: Peter Nowlan is a professional knife sharpener based in Halifax (Canada) and he recommends the KnifePlanet Sharpening Stone Set, a beginners and intermediate kit that includes 4 sharpening grits: 400/1000, 3000/8000, a bamboo base and the KnifePlanet Flattening Stone. The Japanese Naniwa 3-stone combination is also a great (and more expensive) choice, ideal for professionals and more advanced sharpeners: the Naniwa stones are slightly bigger compared to KnifePlanet’s. In both cases, a coarse, medium and fine grit combination is very effective to sharpen and refine the edge:
This was the first Whetstone that I've ever purchased. After reviewing several 'how-to' videos, I jumped right in to use it. I found the process nearly meditative and the BearMoo stone extremely effective! The first knife I sharpened was very dull with small, jagged edges. The 1000 grit side effectively removed the jagged indentations and created a nice cutting edge. The 4000 grit side made the knife razor sharp. The process took nearly 40-minutes.

So, why are there four slots? Unlike many other electric and manual sharpeners which sharpen both sides of the blade at one time, this sharpener sharpens one side at a time. Therefore, two slots are for the rough grit and two slots are for the fine grit. This is especially helpful for those people who prefer to only sharpen one side of certain blades.

When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
Chefs and meat cutters frequently pause and “steel” their cutting edges. Steeling doesn’t sharpen an edge; it straightens it. That’s necessary because the thin edge actually bends or warps while you’re cutting. If you could see the edge under a microscope, it would look wavy, and it would feel dull while cutting. Steeling the knife straightens out all those waves to restore a straight, even cutting edge. So when your knife begins to seem dull, don’t sharpen it—steel it first. Every time you grab a knife for the first time to begin cutting, steel it before you even get started. But it’s important to do it right or you’ll just make the edge worse. And don’t act like one of the Iron Chefs on TV and do it all up in the air—you’ll eventually wind up in the ER. Rest the end of the steel on a cutting board and do your steeling the safer and more accurate way. It’s very important that you steel at an angle between 20 and 30 degrees. Photo 1 shows you how to figure that out.
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