Our large selection of stones from many well-known manufacturers will allow connoisseurs to find the ideal stone for their needs. Because all manufacturers formulate their stones to emphasize a different mix of qualities, and because these qualities can vary widely between different stones, most woodworkers choose stones from several manufacturers to build up an optimal set of sharpening stones. Then again, once you get to know the characteristics of certain types of stone, you may find one supplier who will provide all the stones you need. Sometimes this can be an advantage. But there is no one size that fits all; each stone must fit your needs and work style.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO performs double duty as a knife sharpener and a tool sharpener. Its ability to perform multiple tasks is part of why this sharpener looks so intimidating. Instead of using spinning discs like most electric sharpeners, this Work Sharp uses belts. In fact, it works a lot like a typical electric sander. A motor pulls the belts along so that they gently shave away at whatever you place them against.
This knife sharpener features precision-ground tungsten-carbide sharpener on bars which can automatically adjust to provide different blade angles. And just by changing hand positions, you can easily fine-sharp or hone the knife as often as you like. With regular honing, you will maintain a sharp edge without removing metal and extending the lifetime of the blade.
Certain knife sharpeners require you to spend up to 15 minutes of your life, just to get the edge or sharpness that you desire. If you are a busy individual, you may not have all that time in your life, and that is where the SunrisePro Knife Sharpener comes in. It makes the whole process of sharpening a knife easy and fast. It doesn’t matter how dull or damaged your blade is, this machine gets the job done within a few seconds.
Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.

To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.
Why, then, do so many of us shy away from the task? To put it bluntly, it's because it's a rather daunting process for the beginner. Your image of knife sharpening may consist of a hyper-masculine chef slashing away violently at a steel rod (we're looking at you, Gordon). Conversely, you might have seen cooks meticulously and methodically stroking their blade up and down a Japanese waterstone with more intricate attention to detail than a Flemish landscape. 
Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.

The word “Novaculite” is derived from the Latin word “novacula”, which means “razor stone” and is essentially a metamorphic, recrystallized, variety of Chert composed mostly of microcrystalline quartz that is found in the found in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma and in the Marathon Uplift of  Deposited in the Devonian Period and the early Mississippian Subperiod some 410 to 325 million years ago and subjected to uplift and folding during the Ouachita orogeny of the Atokan Epoch (early Pennsylvanian Subperiod), Novaculite is a very tough stone that is resistant to erosion and thus, the various layers of Novaculite stand out as ridges in the Ouachita Mountains. Thus, due to both its availability and its composition, it has been mined since ancient times for use as arrowheads and spear heads as well as in more modern times for use as sharpening stones.
Hobby microscope view of a 220 grit diamond sharpening stone. Tiny diamonds are electroplated to a perforated metal carrier strip and bonded to a plastic backing. The feature identified with the red line across it measures about 0.08 mm across. The dark area at upper right is a void designed to allow for swarf created during sharpening to be cleared from the diamonds. This relatively coarse stone would be used to reshape a damaged blade edge which would be refined by finer grit stones.
With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
Every finished product you serve to your customers goes through a number of steps from growing, harvesting, and shipping to receiving, prepping, and serving. In each one of these steps, potential food safety hazards that might sicken or injure the final consumer are present. However, with careful planning, these hazards can be prevented, reduced to safe levels, or even eliminated altogether. Keep reading to learn what a HACCP plan is and the steps needed to create your own. What does HACCP Stand For? HACCP stands for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points. It is a system restaurant operators put in place to help them identify and react to dangerous biological, chemical, or physical food contamination. The goal of this food management s

With V-notch systems, some people may experience difficulty applying just the right amount of pressure to ensure an even sharpening on the blade. The Brod & Taylor design includes a spring-loaded sharpening configuration that overcomes this problem for most people, according to the Kitchen Boy review. One Amazon customer reviewer experienced this problem. However, once you have the hang of this machine, it works great.


Similar to electric sharpeners, manual sharpeners simplify the entire sharpening process. However, they tend to have fewer slots for sharpening. One benefit of manual or handheld sharpeners is their portability. Their manual operation, combined with their small size, makes it convenient for cooking professionals who are always on the move. Depending on how the manual sharpener is designed, you can either draw your knife between the slots or the sharpener is moved along the blade of the knife. Whichever type you choose, manual sharpeners easily sharpen a blunt or dull knife, to the desired level of sharpness.


I really like this stone. The 1000/4000 grit combination is perfect for my needs. I'm a woodturner, and belong to a club that brings in professional turners from around the world. One had an eye opening test of sharpness. He stacked around 25 new razor blades in a box with one open side. The box assured that the blades were in perfect alignment. If you looked at the blades' sharp ends head on, all you saw was black. His point was that if you can see the edge, the blade is not sharp. Any reflection from the edge, again, facing it head on, is a dull spot. My long story leads to the fact that I was able to sharpen several knives to the point of not seeing the edge. This is not the stone to use if you are trying to remove nicks from a blade. A lower grit will do that job. This is for putting a fine, "invisible" edge on the blade, and with the right technique, that's what it will do. Another thing to consider is the fact that these stones are "sacrificial" A stone wears because it is deliberately giving up dull surface particles to expose the sharp ones below them. Anyone expecting a stone to last forever is mistaken. Bottom line? I think this is a great stone that takes my knives to the level of sharpness I need in both woodworking and cooking. I also like the rubber frame it sits in, giving you much better control over the stone. Your efforts can go into sharpening without having to steady the stone on your workbench or countertop.
The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.

The manual Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener was the most distinctive tool in our test. Unlike the rest of the models we tried, it employs the V-notch system in which you “carve” a new edge on sharpened tungsten-carbide stones. As noted above, typically you can find such systems in cheap one-step sharpeners that have a deserved reputation for removing too much metal from blades and producing wavy edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. And going into our test, we were skeptical. However, thanks to clever and precise engineering, the Brød & Taylor model produced an excellent edge. It allowed us to hone and polish that edge simply by changing the angle of the blade, producing a sharp, even, stable, and durable edge that nearly matched that from our upgrade pick, the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV.
The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
Our favorite way to sharpen a blade is to use a whetstone—a rectangular block that works almost like sandpaper, helping to straighten and refine the cutting edge on the blade as you slide the knife across it. Most whetstones are designed to be soaked in water before every use, so check the manufacturer's instructions to be sure. (Fun fact: Whetstones aren't actually named for the fact that most are used wet—"whet" is actually just an old word for "sharpen").
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