Practice holding the knife at a 20 degree angle. Most straight blades need to be sharpened at a 20 degree angle. To find the angle, hold the directly in front of you so it's straight up and down. This is 90 degrees. Tilt the knife halfway towards the table so it's at a 45 degree angle. Tilt the knife halfway again so it's about an inch (2.5 cm) above the table. This should be a 20 degree angle.[4]
I love this whetstone pendant!! I’ve been wearing it a couple weeks now and this thing not only performs like a champ but looks really cool. I originally left a 3 Star review like a jerk because I didn’t like the fact that my stone was all white. Idve rathered some markings but after wearing and using this thing the markings are something I could really care less about. This piece is super functional, extremely well crafted and looks great as an edc sharpening stone/necklace!! You guys rock!!
The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.

Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.
Unfortunately, the arrays of modern whetstone can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils. The most difficult to determine is whether the whetstone is fake or fabricated with low quality of materials. To avoid this you can only go for the reliable brand of a whetstone.

Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
I really liked this whetstone! I had a Smith's pocket sharpener that could get my knife sharp enough for working around in the yard (I have an Opinel no.8). However, in doing a little research I found that the sharpener was only around 600 grit on the finest setting. So this BearMoo 1000/4000 grit looked like the perfect step up, and it turned out to be the perfect stone for me. The pictures are an accurate representation of what you get. The removable rubber base was helpful when switching from one side to the next, and it kept the stone from sliding around. The instructions say that the stone can work with either water or oil, but that water is preferred. It said to leave the stone soaking in water for five minutes, and the stone worked like a champ. I especially liked how the instructions gave you an approximate time of how long the stone takes to sharpen a knife -- it just helped give me an idea that it would take about 15-20 minutes on the 1000 grit side, and then another 10-15 minutes on the 4000 grit. Just turn on a TV show!

Cost – While you can get a perfectly serviceable sharpening stick or stone sharpener for short money and some very high-quality tabletop manual 2 and 3-stage sharpeners for less than $50, high-quality mechanical systems will often run you $200 or even more. While that’s not so much money it’s likely to impact the quality of your life it is a lot to pay to keep a decent edge on your knives. While how much you ultimately pay for a sharpener is entirely up to you, you may want to consider your commitment to cooking and how often you are actually liable to use the device. If this is your first sharpener you might also want to consider learning how to sharpen a blade using a classic stick or stone sharpener first, before deciding if moving up to a mechanical sharpener is the right thing for you.


You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
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Identify the bevel angle of the blade, better known as the "rough grind angle." Every knife is at a particular angle to suit all your needs and purposes. The majority of the pocket knives have a bevel edge is 25 to 30 degrees. Call the manufacturer of the knife if you are "weary" of this. Or go online and find a specific bevel angle chart. Nevertheless, when you find the bevel, you'll see the blade is honed into it for obvious purposes. How to sharpen a pocket knife begins with learning angles.
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After you have completed a few passes over the stone on both sides, you can move to the final stage. This time it is P1 pressure, just enough pressure for you to control the knife. Ensure your stone is wet and now repeat the motions but with very very light pressure. You really need to focus here and ensure you are reaching the edge of the edge and again, just a few sweeps on both sides of the knife.
A great sharpener for all your kitchen knives the CS2 also makes a smart addition to the gear when you’re going away on a family camping trip. It will also do a bang-up job on your hunting, pocket, boning knife and more. As mentioned it does require just a bit of getting used to in order to achieve optimal results but nothing too involved. A simple, effective, no-frills sharpener.
The speed and polishing ability of waterstones attract many sharpeners. Waterstones sharpen quickly and are available in fine polishing grits not found in other stone types. The ability to flatten the stones is a necessity when sharpening with waterstones, so a starting set should include a flattening stone of some kind. Our article, How to Flatten a Waterstone, has more information about keeping waterstones flat.
The angle on a Buck Knife is set based upon how we feel the knife will be used. Heavy use needs a strong and blunt "V" while skinning or filleting would need a deeper but more vulnerable "V". We tend to grind to 13-16 degrees per side (see illustrations). If you match the existing edge angle and hold the knife against the stone to cut evenly across the edge grind, you will produce an edge with a similar angle.
The fit and finish on this product is amazing. He stone is beautiful and clearly high quality and very well cut. It’s different features on even such a small stone are huge. The leather cord and it’s unique knot is incredible. This is absolutely part of my edc, something I am happy to wear all the time. It’s useful and looks great too. Couldn’t be more happy with it.
Clean the knives and stone. As soon as you've finished sharpening your knives, wash and dry the blades. You should also clean the stone according to the manufacturer's instructions. For example, if you have an oil stone, you might need to scrub it occasionally with a stiff fiber brush and soak it in oil. For a water stone, wash off any of the residue and store it in a dry cloth until you need to use it again.[11]
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
At age 10, Terada learned the basics of sushi from his father and then went on to attend RKC Chef's School in Kochi, Japan from 1987-1989. He soon earned a nickname for his fast knife, attention to detail, divine presentation and ability to create new dishes and accents based on traditional Japanese cuisine. After graduating RKC Chef School, he was called to serve under Master Chef Kondo at Yuzuan restaurant in Kochi, Japan from 1989-1992. Mr. Kondo is the master of Kansai style cooking, considered to be the high-end of Japanese cuisine. Terada earned the title Master Sushi Chef by becoming the standing head sushi chef & can serve Fugu (Japan Licensed) to the public.
The speed and polishing ability of waterstones attract many sharpeners. Waterstones sharpen quickly and are available in fine polishing grits not found in other stone types. The ability to flatten the stones is a necessity when sharpening with waterstones, so a starting set should include a flattening stone of some kind. Our article, How to Flatten a Waterstone, has more information about keeping waterstones flat.
Furthermore, Novaculite consists of several different layers of stone of different densities, grit sizes, and colors. Thus, the red Novaculite layer (aka Washita Stone) is the both the softest and most coarse while, the next most coarse/hard grade is the grey/white Soft Arkansas stone; both of which cut relatively fast for a hard whetstone material and thus, they are an excellent choice for refining a bevel. Then, the next grade of coarseness/hardness is the hard Arkansas stone which is used to polish the bevel rather than define it and, last there are the grades of Hard Black and Hard Translucent Arkansas stones which are used for extremely fine honing and polishing of a cutting edge. Plus, it’s also the primary material in “Charnley Forest” (English) and “Turkey” oilstones.
A: That depends almost entirely on how often you use them. If you are a professional chef who uses his or her knives every day then you should hone them every time you use your knives. But honing has its limits and over time your edge is going to become dull no matter what. Therefore your knives will need to be sharpened at least several times a year. Some chefs, in fact, will use a whetstone on an almost daily basis in order to ensure their knives are always razor sharp. Most of us, however, are not professional chefs and may not even touch our kitchen knives for days at a time. In that case, it’s probably a good idea to hone the edge after every couple of uses and have your knives sharpened once a year. 
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