I love this whetstone pendant!! I’ve been wearing it a couple weeks now and this thing not only performs like a champ but looks really cool. I originally left a 3 Star review like a jerk because I didn’t like the fact that my stone was all white. Idve rathered some markings but after wearing and using this thing the markings are something I could really care less about. This piece is super functional, extremely well crafted and looks great as an edc sharpening stone/necklace!! You guys rock!!
Takeaway coffee cups are everywhere due to convenience, but it's led to a nasty carbon footprint. Huskee is changing that trend with these handsome, sustainable coffee cups. Using discarded coffee bean husks, they've created eight ounce vessels that are durable, reusable, and even keep your coffee hot longer than a paper cup. Arriving as a set of 4, each cup comes with a travel lid.

The kind of tech we love: compact, reliable, durable, attractive and cheap. Purists may feel that other sharpeners will produce a more perfect result but for 99% of the human race this sharpener will be everything the doctor ordered. Your blades stay sharp for a good long time thanks to the 2-stage sharpening process and if you’re a left handed chef you’ll love the fact that it works just as effectively for you as for anyone else.


Made from hand-selected A36 hot rolled steel that is left untreated to allow it to age naturally and beautifully from season to season, Stahl's new X firepit will be a center of warmth and attention for generations. Each minimalist firepit is made in Portland, Oregon and includes four 3/16 inch steel pieces that can be assembled in minutes with no complicated parts or screws.
I bought this and Unimi's 600/1000 whetstone at the same time. Curiously, reviews are currently blocked for their 600/1000 model, as amazon wouldn't let me leave one for it. Considering the conspicuous absence of reviews in the other stone's listing, one can only assume they're being censored for everyone. So, maybe I should be more critical of these stones, and use them a while longer before giving them any praise? But I've had a very positive experience with them so far, and the 600/1000 stone was the one I found most useful.

So you are going to start at the heel and you are going to time it so that it goes all the way across. You go from one side to the other. You also want to make sure that your stone, I am not going to use as much pressure as I normally would because I cannot mount it on this showcase, you want to alternate from side to side to keep your bevel centered. Some people will take and do three times on one side and then three times on the other, the problem is that your backhand is never as good as your forehand and you end up cheating and you are going to end up with a blade that is offset. That is going to take it and thin down, you are going to get a thin bevel right on the edge. Once you get that V established, you can go from the coarser side to the finer side.


I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,
However, it should also be noted that “water stones” are generally significantly softer than oil stones and thus, water stones generally cut faster than oil stones but, they also have to be flattened more often that oil stones do. Furthermore, it should be noted that some water stones must be soaked in water for several hours prior to use whereas, others are of the “splash and sharpen” variety and thus, they only need to be soaked for a few minutes before use and then wetted down occasionally during sharpening process. Diamond hones on the other hand are more durable than either water stones or oil stones and, because they generally have a more coarse grit, they cut faster than natural whetstones. Plus, due to their construction, they never need truing and, in fact, coarse diamond hones are often used to flatten both natural and synthetic whetstones.

These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
We’re happy to present something everyone has been waiting for – a combination diamond/ceramic whetstone that will handle all your sharpening needs. The newly-developed DC3 and DC4 whetstones consist of a fine diamond stone (25 micron) and a very special ceramic stone, made of synthetic sapphires. The advantage of these materials, although they get worn, will still keep their flat shape this is important when you sharpen your knife. And, since these materials are the hardest we know of, they will sharpen any steel, even these extremely hard powder steels. You don’t need any lubrication for these stone but now and then you should consider cleaning them with warm water and liquid soap. The stones might feel coarse from the start but will become smoother/better after some use. A leather pouch is included.
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.
Put the pointed, narrow end of the sharpener up against the open end of the gut hook. The narrow, pointed end of the sharpener should face in toward the thickness of the blade, away from the edge of the gut hook. Match the angle of the sharpener to the original edge angle. This will maintain the correct sharpening angle and prevent you from getting cut by the blade tip. Hold the same angle when sharpening each side of the gut hook.
This wedge ends up short of a "point" to a much larger degree than the picture would indicate. The metal stops short, but then there is black non-slide "tape" applied to one side, and white "slide" tape applied to the other side, which makes the wedge even thicker than it appears in the photo, which means that in practice the end of wedge is even more truncated. So I have a hard time supporting my knives accurately on this wedge while sliding them down into contact with my stones. Prior to buying this wedge I just used a wooden wedge I cut off of a 3" by 3" post using a miter saw, said wedgewhich has a much less truncated end. That wooden wedge unfortunately absorbs water from my Japanese Waterstones. But I will try spraying polyurethane on that wooden wedge to help waterproof itand try again. If that doesn't work I will try to find a 3" by 3" plastic trim board somewhere and cut a wedge off the end of that. Note that you can buy 20 degree plastic wedges, but this is the first one I have found that does 15 degrees (nominal.) Note that Amazon also has the Blue AngleGuide set of wedges, but they are very small https://www.amazon.com/Angle-Guides-Sharpening-Knife-Stone/dp/B01N4QMO7U/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1499301705&sr=8-4&keywords=sharpening+angle+guide
Unfortunately, the arrays of modern whetstone can be bewildering to the inexperienced sharpeners that so often times many of them end up with a crap or wrong decision on stone type for their utensils. The most difficult to determine is whether the whetstone is fake or fabricated with low quality of materials. To avoid this you can only go for the reliable brand of a whetstone.
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
The little white pieces don't seem to damage my stones, though I am careful to apply the bulk of my pressure to the blade edge. They ride back and forth just fine. There is a little bit of an art to finding the right movements so the jig doesn't fall off the side of your stone but you can still use most of the stone. It's sort of angled down and away from the top corner to the opposite bottom corner
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.
Also natural stones have a random grit size that gives a long lasting edge. Basically the random grits create varying sizes of micro-serration in the blade that wear down at a different rate, therefore longer edge retention. Whether this is true or not we really like natural stone, especially for sharpening tradition single bevel Japanese knives. Use natural stones with water – it’s far cheaper than sake.
There will be a drawer that extends into the mechanism under the abrasives. Any detritus from the sharpening process drops into this drawer. Exactly where the drawer is located will differ from sharpener to sharpener but it shouldn’t be hard to find. Remove the drawer flick any material into the wastebasket and then wipe out the drawer with a damp cloth or tissue. You may want to use work gloves and goggles to protect your hands and eyes from any loose metal shavings. Once the drawer is clean and dry replace it. The exact means by which the sharpening mechanism itself is cleaned will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Consult your owners guide for specific details. Make sure you don’t introduce any grease or other lubricants into the sharpener unless specifically directed to do so by the owner’s manual. Also, the outside of the sharpener should come perfectly clean with just a damp cloth. Avoid using commercial cleaners or abrasives of any kind. 

Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.

It is better to understand the difference in sharpening stone materials before you are going to make any decision. Among the available options in the market today, Waterstone, oilstone and diamond stone are the most common type of sharpening stone. Each of stones comes with advantages and disadvantages. Waterstone and oilstone are available in natural and synthetic models. Synthetic are the most common and easy to find as man makes them. As the use of natural stones (e.g. original Arkansas or Japanese natural whetstones) is has diminished in popularity, they are beginning to rare in the market. Artificial stones have a more consistent particle size and controlled with a tight mechanism in providing high-quality sharpening stone.

Our large selection of stones from many well-known manufacturers will allow connoisseurs to find the ideal stone for their needs. Because all manufacturers formulate their stones to emphasize a different mix of qualities, and because these qualities can vary widely between different stones, most woodworkers choose stones from several manufacturers to build up an optimal set of sharpening stones. Then again, once you get to know the characteristics of certain types of stone, you may find one supplier who will provide all the stones you need. Sometimes this can be an advantage. But there is no one size that fits all; each stone must fit your needs and work style.
I like the fact that there are two different grits (can be seen as two colors). the black rubber feet stick to the kitchen granite top like glue. The 1000 does a pretty good job of getting a knife roughly there and the 4000 puts on a fine polish for razor a sharp edge. I would go the extra step of stropping the knife after the grinding operation for an extra sharp edge.
The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.
Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.

Leaning on decades of audio experience, Grado took their time developing their first Bluetooth headphone. It was worth the wait. The GW100 delivers the effortless detail and power the brand is known for, using the same signature drivers. Their open-back design is a world first for Bluetooth headphones and has been built to reduce escaping sound by up to 60% compared to wired open-backs. And while the wires might be missing, Grado's timeless design language remains intact, ensuring they look great with any ensemble.

The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.

I can personally verify that this will get your knives very sharp. I will spare you all the gory details, but the picture is of the instructions the ER sent me home with after stopping the bleeding and patching me up. I have to say, that’s not what I had in mind regarding “Thanksgiving tips”. So: not only will knives slide easily through spinach, but they will go through finger and fingernail like a hot knife through butter after being sharpened by this whetstone. Very clean, straight cut. Impressive, really. Just take it slow and don’t be a moron like me.

I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,


This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.
Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.
This coarse grit whetstone is great for prepping old and dull knives that need to be sharpened with a fine grit stone. One of my good knives edge looked like someone had tried to chop barbed wire. After ten minutes on each side of the stone, the edge was smooth and free of imperfections. After it hit the knife with the fine grit stone, I was cutting onions and apples like hot butter! I would soak this stone for 12-24 hours before using. It sucks water like a sponge. The surface needs to be damp when you sharpen.
It is better to understand the difference in sharpening stone materials before you are going to make any decision. Among the available options in the market today, Waterstone, oilstone and diamond stone are the most common type of sharpening stone. Each of stones comes with advantages and disadvantages. Waterstone and oilstone are available in natural and synthetic models. Synthetic are the most common and easy to find as man makes them. As the use of natural stones (e.g. original Arkansas or Japanese natural whetstones) is has diminished in popularity, they are beginning to rare in the market. Artificial stones have a more consistent particle size and controlled with a tight mechanism in providing high-quality sharpening stone.
Why, then, do so many of us shy away from the task? To put it bluntly, it's because it's a rather daunting process for the beginner. Your image of knife sharpening may consist of a hyper-masculine chef slashing away violently at a steel rod (we're looking at you, Gordon). Conversely, you might have seen cooks meticulously and methodically stroking their blade up and down a Japanese waterstone with more intricate attention to detail than a Flemish landscape. 
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