If you want the highest quality knife blade you need to learn how to use a whetsone, the most effective Japanese way of sharpening knives is to maintain their edge crisp and sharp. Today only, get this audio bestseller for a special price. Whetstone will not only teach you the basics of knife sharpening, but also an essential range of other essential skills. You will learn how to thin old knives to renew them and make them as good as new. You will also learn how to create a knife sharpening plan that will have you sharpening knives like a professional Here Is A Preview Of What You'll Learn... The Basics of Knife Sharpening Types of Sharpening Stones A Brief Word About Grits About Whetstone Sharpening Stone How Often Should You Sharpen Your Knives? Developing Your Knife Sharpening Skills Using the Correct Angle Applying the Right Pressure Level Thinning a Knife And much, much more! Download your copy today! Take action today and download this audiobook now at a special price!
Here is what you need to get started and it does not begin with the tangibles. Success will come quickly if you understand and can visualize what it is you are attempting to do, what has to happen to make a knife sharp. My experience is with Japanese Water Stones but the same will hold true for other methods. I do not recommend pull through gadgets or electric grinders of any type by the way, I am opposed to those methods although I understand the desire to try everything out… remember, I thought I needed everything and I thought everything worked.

Technically, the name whetstone can be applied to any form of sharpening stone, regardless of what cutting fluid is typically used with it. However because whet sounds like wet, many hear the word and assume that it refers to a stone that is used wet with water. Actually, water stones, oil stones diamond stones and ceramic stones are all forms of whetstones. So, while all water stones are whetstones, not all whetstones are water stones.
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil! 

Honing is kind of like dusting the furniture while sharpening is more like reupholstering the furniture. Honing is purely a maintenance activity that should be regularly practiced to make sure the blade is clean and sharp as can be every time you use it. It’s easily done using a honing rod, a leather strop or a sharpening stone; as most stones have a side for sharpening and a side for honing. Honing is akin to trimming your hair to remove the split ends. It’s not a full on haircut. What it does is realign the tiny sharp protrusions along the edge of the blade that can be bent over with use, so that they stand more or less straight.

A: Most chefs have their own personal favorite and that’s what it comes down to for just about everybody; personal choice. If you’re the kind who likes to get personally involved in the process you might want to opt for a stone or stick knife sharpener.  These will allow you a certain amount of satisfaction knowing it was your expertise that produced the razor sharp edge. Others, however, are quite content to let the machine do the work and that’s fine too.


If you do not remove enough metal to create a new edge, you will leave some of the dull edge in place. A dull blade (or a blade with dull spots or nicks) will reflect light from the very edge of the blade. A razor sharp knife edge will not show "bright spots" when you hold it blade up under a bright light. You will need to remove enough material from the sides of the bevel so that the edge stops reflecting light.
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.
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