Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.
Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
HIGH-QUALITY DOUBLE-SIDED KNIFE SHARPENING STONE: Coarse side 1000 grit leaves metal edge with frosted appearance. Edge sharpness equivalent to majority of factory edges on knives, tools; Fine side 4000 grit is ideal for finishing and polishing the edge, make edge very sharp, and edge reflects light well. Perfect for light touch-ups to an already sharp.
However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.
Identify the bevel angle of the blade, better known as the "rough grind angle." Every knife is at a particular angle to suit all your needs and purposes. The majority of the pocket knives have a bevel edge is 25 to 30 degrees. Call the manufacturer of the knife if you are "weary" of this. Or go online and find a specific bevel angle chart. Nevertheless, when you find the bevel, you'll see the blade is honed into it for obvious purposes. How to sharpen a pocket knife begins with learning angles.
Finally, when you learn how to sharpen a pocket knife becomes reality, you'll ultimately see the difference in your blade. Every sportsman and kitchen guru should learn how to sharpen a pocket-knife the proper way without "nicking it" or "shaving the edges" off too much you end up with a short and stout blade. Consequently, selecting the proper pocket-knife sharpener is important so learning the in's and out's of how to sharpen a pocket-knife before and after using it is all in the practice as well as in the sharpener itself.
I know that it is very helpful to watch a video of this process and the best videos of knife sharpening I have seen are out there for you. If you only watch one person sharpen a knife, watch Jon Broida from Japanese Knife Imports. Extremely professional videos and easy to understand. I have a couple of videos as well on my website but I really like what Jon has done for the sharpening community.
One thing about this stone is that it is very "thirsty." I had a cup of water close by just to add a little water periodically when it felt like it was scraping a little too aggressively. Also, be sure to do as the instructions say and use different parts of the sharpening surface. I wasn't paying attention the first few minutes, and apparently I would end each sharpening pass in the exact same spot, creating a very very small notch on the edge of the stone. So I turned the stone around and made sure to vary the ending spot, and it seemed to buff out that little notch very quickly. My knife is now incredibly sharp--it seems to glide through material rather than "cut" it. I know some people would continue to go even higher with the grit, but for my purposes this whetstone is just perfect. I'll be tackling the kitchen knives next!
The goal in sharpening a serration is to maintain the ramp of the serration right to the edge. You do not want to create an edge bevel. Therefore we once again recommend the trusty felt pen trick. Paint the serration to be sharpened and follow your process. Evaluate if you are removing all the black. It should not take more than 5-8 strokes to resharpen if your angle was correct. Rotate or spin the sharpener as you go for the most even, consistent sharpening.
The whetstone is the most popular for sharpening pocket knives (or knives). But, before  you go into the sharpening, you must prepare the whetstone beforehand.  Don't worry, it's quite easy. The majority used can be done by dipping the stone in water for about 15 minutes. Regardless of what type of whetstone you use, never use it while it's dry. It's important for a clean sharpening. Using mineral oil is another way to prepare a whetstone. It'll absorb into it once you begin putting the right amount on the surface. How you will determine how much to put is to ensure a "thick film" is lathered across the entire surface. This is critical when you learn how to sharpen a pocket knife.
For the common sharpening purpose, generally, people tend to use two phases. In the first phases, they use the coarse stone to shape the edges then jump to the finer stone. In application, these of the two phases can be extended with the grit stone in between. It might be varying in the number of grits or mesh in different types of sharpening stone.
I do have to question the grit ratings of these stones. I didn't notice anything before using them, but after a day, the 2000 grit actually felt courser than the 1000 grit side of the other stone. Whether that could be a byproduct of other factors or an indication of the more obvious, being that the grit ratings aren't accurate, I don't know. But that seemed to be the main criticism of cheaper whetstones, that their grit ratings often aren't accurate. Or maybe it's less a problem with accuracy and more a difference that most synthetic stones might have in common when being compared to much pricier natural stones?
You need a stone holder, something that can be purchased for as little as $20.00 to keep the water stone is place as you sharpen. A lot of water stones come with a base, so there’s so need to get it separately. Some people just have the stone on a piece of wood over a container of water with a cloth underneath the stone to keep it from slipping. The key is that you don’t need to spend a lot of money to get started and you don’t need Naniwa Chosera stones, you can start with King water stones if you like, those are fine and I don’t mention King in an attempt to say they are inferior in any way. The key to learning is not what you are using, not the quality or brand of stones, it is developing consistency with a technique that you can use comfortably and repeat. Saying that, stay away from the seven dollar stones available at the hardware store. (Remember, I tried everything).

Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
Ease of use – Most people in search of a mechanical sharpener want one because they don’t want to be bothered with trying to achieve a perfect edge themselves using a stick or sharpening stone. They want predictable, first class results every time. In that case it’s important that the electric powered device is easy to use, achieves results quickly and with little effort and is designed with user safety in mind. Keep in mind too that it’s easy to apply too much pressure when using a mechanical sharpener and when that happens you’re likely to see unsatisfactory results. In addition there are subtle differences between mechanical devices designed for Asian-style knives and those designed for Western-style knives. This has to do with the sharpening angle discussed above. Don’t get an Asian sharpener if you don’t need precise control over your cuts.
✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.
An extremely well written and informative article on sharpening. Overtime we all get to love certain stones for our sharpening needs. I am a huge coticule fan, and although i have used all the others, i always come back to this natural stone above all others. Still trying to figure if i chose it or it chose me! NEver the less there are so many options out there it is not hard with a little time and effort to find the right combination for your needs.
This 600/1,000 grit is my second Unimi knife sharpener, the first is 2,000/6,000 grit and I love them both. Both stones together produce very sharp and well polished knives that reduce the cutting effort and save time in the kitchen. I particularly appreciate that the manufacture printed the grit number on the side of each stone - that helps use the different grits in the proper sequence from the coarser to the finer. The stone comes with a non-slip silicone/rubber base which is very handy.

Selecting the right sharpening angle is the next step in sharpening. For more detailed instructions on selecting the right angle, try reading this article. Regardless of the method of sharpening, a appropriate angle should be selected. This angle doesn't need to be exact but following some general guidelines is a good idea. Most knife manufacturers recommend a roughly 20 degree angle. Depending on the use of your knife, you can move up or down from that angle. A fillet or slicing knife is never used on anything hard so an angle a few degrees less will produce a sharper edge. On the other hand, a survival knife with various uses can benefit from a more durable edge a few degrees larger.
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