“This is the second knife sharpener I’ve purchased, and this one was a gift to my dad who was frequently using mine. I love this knife sharpener, as does he. We’ve both used it with great success on knives and blades — from pocket knives, scissors, kitchen knives, lawn-mower blades, to axes and hatchets, and I’m sure I’m forgetting things. Point is: We both use these knife sharpeners frequently, and they live up to the infomercial hype in my opinion.”
For chefs of all skill levels, it is absolutely vital to have a good sharpener in the kitchen. Of course, you need a specific type of sharpener with precise characteristics. You need one that works with your knives! It is also vital to choose one that works quickly and accurately. You don’t want to end up with a blade that has been deformed by the sharpener. Below, you will be able to find a breakdown of some of the very best kitchen knife sharpeners on the market. 
Manual sharpeners fall into two basic categories: those that use a V-shaped cutting notch, often made of ultrahard tungsten carbide, to carve a new edge onto a blade, and those that use fixed or rotating abrasive elements (either an abrasive ceramic or diamond-impregnated steel) to grind a new edge. In general you get what you pay for with both kinds. Cheap models under $20 get a lot of complaints about sharpening performance, ergonomics, and durability. Move into the $40 to $50 range, and you begin to see more solid results. The cheap V-notch sharpeners, in particular, get terrible marks from most knowledgeable reviewers; such models remove huge amounts of metal, rapidly wearing knives into toothpicks, and they leave uneven edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. (I used one of these for about a week in the ranch kitchen and can attest to their awfulness.) However, as you’ll see below, when done right a V-notch sharpener is an attractive option.

★ SHARPEN ANY EDGE – THE PERFECT GIFT – Our professional grade knife sharpener doesn’t only work its magic on Kitchen and Chef Knives, its versatility extends to virtually any blade! Sharpen Fillet Knives, Sushi Knives, Pruners, Straight Razor Blades, Scissors, Chisels, Pocket Knives, Axes, and Hunting Knives! With so many of these things used in our daily lives, it makes a thoughtful gift for any family member or friend.


They are undoubtedly the best sharpening stones available in the market. Due to their strength and long lasting abilities, they are the number one product category. As they are made from diamond they are very expensive which is their only downside. But if you can get one of these they will serve you for your lifetime easily without any doubt. Diamond honing stones are best.

Your Budget – Budget and pricing will always be a factor no matter what you purchase. As already mentioned, some of these sharpeners are more expensive than others, but those that are tend to be much more convenient. Ultimately, this will come down to a personal choice. Make sure that you set a budget and stick with. By doing this, you will be able to get a solid product that won’t bankrupt you.
I’ve been sharpening knives since I was 9 or 10 years old, starting with a Browning pocket knife that I still carry. Later, working on a cattle ranch, I was at various times responsible for keeping the butcher’s knives and the boarding house’s kitchen knives in good working order using Arkansas oilstones. I’ve been cooking for myself for almost 20 years, and I’ve been keeping my trusty santoku shaving-sharp that whole time using Japanese waterstones (more on those in How we picked). So I appreciate a truly fine edge. But I’m also big on the Korean concept of koenchanayo (“that’s good enough”), and so for the past seven years I’ve also used an electric sharpener for my cheap, stamped-steel paring knives (which Wirecutter’s Lesley Stockton also loves) and for my expensive, forged heavy chef’s knife. In short: I’m not one of those knife geeks for whom nothing less than an atom-splitting edge is acceptable. The defining characteristic of a sharp knife is that it cuts neatly, easily, and safely in its intended tasks—and there’s more than one way to get an edge that sharp.
I am a home cook with several Wustoff Classic knives and a few Global knives. I do not prepare sushi. I have tried a variety of whetstones ranging from 600 grit to 4000 grit. This stone, with 600 on one side and 1000 on the other, is the one stone I use every time. It's usually all I need, frankly, to get my knives super sharp for the type of cooking I do everyday. .
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
Honing is kind of like dusting the furniture while sharpening is more like reupholstering the furniture. Honing is purely a maintenance activity that should be regularly practiced to make sure the blade is clean and sharp as can be every time you use it. It’s easily done using a honing rod, a leather strop or a sharpening stone; as most stones have a side for sharpening and a side for honing. Honing is akin to trimming your hair to remove the split ends. It’s not a full on haircut. What it does is realign the tiny sharp protrusions along the edge of the blade that can be bent over with use, so that they stand more or less straight.
After this has been completed, you will be able to select your preferred sharpening stone and bring it down to the blade. At this point, you will be able to begin sharpening the blade. If you choose the right system, such as the KME Precision Knife Sharpening System, you will be able to flip the knife around, without removing it. This will help to ensure that both sides of the blade receive the exact edge that you desire. Although this might seem complicated, the process is actually very simple and effortless, after you’ve done it a few times. Still, you will need to check the instruction manual provided with your system for correct usage procedures.
If you are just starting out in sharpening one of the biggest challenges is going to be developing the muscle memory needed to get a sense of the angle at which you are sliding the blade across the stone. Keeping the angle consistent as you move the knife across the blade is important if you want to develop a consistent edge on your knives. The Suehiro Knife Sharpening Guide simply clips onto the spine of your knife and helps you to set the angle of your edge.

The Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 is our overall pick among knife sharpeners. A manual model, it was the easiest of all our test models to use—almost intuitive, in fact: You insert the blade in one of the slots and run it back and forth, from heel to tip, until the tool grinds a new edge. The sharpening elements are wheels impregnated with diamond abrasive—a material that Cook’s Illustrated found to be superior (subscription required) to ceramics in both sharpening speed and lack of friction. In our test, about 30 strokes on the coarse wheels under light pressure cut a brand-new edge. Another 20 strokes on the fine, polishing wheels gave the edge a reasonably smooth finish.
Step 1 is to select an appropriate lapping plate or flattening stone, which is extremely coarse. Take a straight edge tool and lay it across your water stone to see if it truly needs flattening. Get down on eye level with the stone to see if a gap is visible, if so, then you will need to do a little bit of flattening. Sometimes the gap may be so slight that you will need to slip a piece of paper underneath the straight edge, which means if it can pass through, the stone needs flattened. This test will prove whether or not the stone genuinely needs to be flattened, so you do not waste your time.
Identify the bevel angle of the blade, better known as the "rough grind angle." Every knife is at a particular angle to suit all your needs and purposes. The majority of the pocket knives have a bevel edge is 25 to 30 degrees. Call the manufacturer of the knife if you are "weary" of this. Or go online and find a specific bevel angle chart. Nevertheless, when you find the bevel, you'll see the blade is honed into it for obvious purposes. How to sharpen a pocket knife begins with learning angles.
I am new to sharpening my own blades using a whetstone but this product seems to do a pretty good job even considering my rudimentary technique. It is large enough to work well for a wide range of blade sizes and comes with a nice holder to keep it from moving while sharpening. I was able to get some pretty good edges so I would imagine someone with more experience using this type of product would be able to get some scary sharp edges using it. The only issue I had other than my own lack of skill was that the 1000 grit side seems to be wearing down fairly quickly. I don't know if this is normal or due to something I am doing but if this continues I don't see the stone lasting for many uses and I thought this would be a long lasting product. Again this may be due to user error so please take this with a grain of salt. Overall I think it's very capable and if long lasting an excellent tool for keeping all your blades sharp.
Turning to the sharpeners themselves, we looked at aspects such as ergonomics, speed and simplicity of use, noise level and overall power (for the electric sharpeners), and build quality. We also weighed cost against performance to get a subjective measure of value. After two hours, we had clear picks for the winner and the upgrade choice, as well as an option for people who want high style along with high performance.
Let’s start with Arkansas. If you have heard about Arkansas oilstone, it uses the Novaculite stone that mined in Arkansas. The most expensive of Arkansas stone is the Hard Translucent model that begins to rare in the market. If you want to shop for Arkansas, they are available in different grade starting from Soft Arkansas, Hard Arkansas, Hard Black Arkansas and Hard Translucent Arkansas. The finest grade of Arkansas can shape such of mirror polishing edges.

The Juuma sharpening and honing stones offer a simplified working principle while at the same time ensuring the highest possible quality in the offered grits. Juuma Cobalt Blue stones are made of an aluminium oxide and a bonding agent. Adding cobalt serves to slow stone abrasion and increase the speed of sharpening. The speed bonus is especially marked when stoning blue steel (blue paper steel that is often used for Japanese planes and chisels). The cobalt gives the stones their blue colour. Juuma is our proprietary brand. Juuma sharpening stones are produced by a renowned Japanese whetstone manufacturer.
My order came in incomplete. I contacted the company and had a response within a couple hours. They immediately responded, researched and started the replacement process. I had my order replacement within 1 week or so. Every email was answered the same day. I so highly recommend this company. LOVE MY PRODUCT AND LOVE THE SERVICE MORE. GREAT COMPANY.

We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
For the common sharpening purpose, generally, people tend to use two phases. In the first phases, they use the coarse stone to shape the edges then jump to the finer stone. In application, these of the two phases can be extended with the grit stone in between. It might be varying in the number of grits or mesh in different types of sharpening stone.

The Idahone stood out on a couple of fine details, too: Its ergonomic maple wood handle was more comfortable than the synthetic handles on the rest of the competitors, and its hanging ring is amply sized and sturdily made of steel. The other ceramic rods we tested had smaller hanging rings, plastic rings, or no hanging ring at all. Hanging a ceramic rod is a good idea, because the material is somewhat brittle and can chip or break if it gets jostled around in a drawer or utensil holder.


This pocket-sized tool sharpens knives using carbide sharpening blades, then gives the knife a smooth finish using ceramic blades. A diamond rod is used for honing knives or for sharpening serrated knives. This is a great tool to keep in the toolkit, the tackle box, or to carry along when camping. Since it’s small, your hands will be close to your sharp knife blades as you work, so you might want to save it for occasional use rather than for sharpening all of your kitchen knives on a regular basis.
Honing is kind of like dusting the furniture while sharpening is more like reupholstering the furniture. Honing is purely a maintenance activity that should be regularly practiced to make sure the blade is clean and sharp as can be every time you use it. It’s easily done using a honing rod, a leather strop or a sharpening stone; as most stones have a side for sharpening and a side for honing. Honing is akin to trimming your hair to remove the split ends. It’s not a full on haircut. What it does is realign the tiny sharp protrusions along the edge of the blade that can be bent over with use, so that they stand more or less straight.
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