As the video of our test shows, the Trizor XV took a very dull, very heavy (and slightly bent) 12-inch Wüsthof chef’s knife and made it tomato-slicing sharp. Setting the new edge took about 20 strokes on the coarse wheel; the fine and polishing steps took about 10 and five strokes respectively. All told, the process was perhaps three minutes of work. The motor was impressively powerful, never allowing the sharpening wheels to bog down or “catch” in the metal of the knife. It sharpened blades to within about ⅜ inch of the heel—as with the manual ProntoPro 4643, excellent performance, and a testament to the attention that Chef’sChoice pays to overall design throughout its extensive product range. This sharpening of virtually the entire blade is important. Without it, not only do you lose the ability to cut with the heel of the knife—especially useful when you’re cutting tough root vegetables, where employing the heel provides stability and pressure—but also over time the blade edge develops a “dish,” or dip, that prevents the rear portion of the blade from contacting the cutting board and slicing all the way through a food item.

The Smith’s 50008 8-Inch Diamond Tri-Hone is a very aggressive unit, but this is good if you know what you are doing. You get a great deal of flexibility with the different types of stones that come with the unit – two diamond plates alongside an Arkansas stone. You can sharpen your everyday, run of the mill blades on the Arkansas stone while reserving the other two stones for your premier blades. Do not use honing solutions that are oil based on this particular sharpener – make sure that you pay attention to the directions in the manual!
The Japanese waterstones help you achieve sharp edges much more quickly than other types of stones, and they have the effect of polishing a blade as it is honed. You only need water to get your cutting edge lubricated, which makes the maintenance of this unit before a job incredibly simple. Woodworkers can also use the Woodstock SteeleX D1130 1000 Grit and 6000 Grit Japanese Waterstone for an aggressive cut that cannot be achieved through any other method.
In our tests, the Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 took seriously dull blades—we ran them against a chunk of concrete curbstone until they were all but useless—to tomato-filleting sharpness in less than a minute. And like all our picks here, it’s far easier to master, and far cheaper, than traditional sharpening stones or modern jig systems. Effective, affordable, simple to use, and easy to store, the ProntoPro 4643 is the clear winner for most people.
This sharpener includes five different sharpening stones along with a knife clamp that holds the knife during sharpening, and a guide that allows you to select the proper blade angle. Honing oil is also included. The stones have finger grips for a secure hold and are color coded so you know which are coarser and which are finer. Unlike traditional whetstones, with this system the knife remains still while you move the stones along the blade. This manual system allows you to sharpen knives at four different angles, but requires some practice to become comfortable with the technique.

Steel – In most cases, the sharpening steels are made from steel or ceramic. Each can effectively hone your blade, but they work differently. Quite frankly, the steel models are quickly being replaced by the much more convenient and quick ceramic. The steel is used in the same manner and looks identical, but it is a little harsher than the ceramic.


However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.
we have a chefs model electric, 3 stone set was supposed to be able to sharpen serrated. Never could do that. But at first the unit was able to get a real good edge on a variety of non serrated edges….then it turned to crap and actually ruined 2 knives that cost more then the unit each….it didnt last long enough . would of been less expensive to pay some one to sharpen the knives it actually did sharpen
Although the Trizor XV is easy to use, you have to use it correctly. That means sharpening one side of the blade at a time until a burr forms, whereas a back-and-forth, one-side-and-then-the-other approach might seem more intuitive. (Don’t worry—the Trizor XV’s manual explains the process plainly.) Maintenance is easy: Once a year or so, you open the bin on the machine’s underside and wipe out the metal shavings that it has conveniently captured there with a magnet.
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
A base for your whetstone should be included in any model you purchase. Considering you are using your whetstone after its been submerged in water; the stone tends to slide on most surfaces when you sharpen. The base, usually a rubber silicone anchor, will ensure that the stone does not move around. A slippery stone can be a hazardous situation. The goal is safety, however, some companies will take liberties to present a decorative base and forgo the safer option.

After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
This sleek, powerful automatic knife sharpening system has a spherical bearing rod guide for easy adjustment and close proximity between the knife and the rod. The cherry hardwood pistol grip provides ultimate comfort and great control over the tool. The key selling point of this product is the incorporation of one fine, one medium, and one extra coarse sharpening stone.
In recent years, some whetstone manufacturers have started producing ceramic whetstones made from hard, ceramic, powders that are mixed with Aluminum Oxide and then sintered to form a solid. But, rather than using oil or water to lubricate the whetstone, ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without lubrication and thus, they provide a significant advantage for chefs who need to keep their knives sharp but, who do not have either the room or time for using a bench water stone. Thus, they are commonly available as either bench stones, pocket stones, round rods, or triangular rods.
Frequently, our recommendation for beginning sharpeners is to start with diamond stones as their strengths make them ideal to build a sharpening toolkit around. Diamond stones are low maintenance and durable, lasting many years with only occasional cleaning. They are among the fastest stones to use making them time efficient. Diamond grit will handle even very hard steels, and diamond stones can be used for flattening waterstones. All these things make diamond stones a practical foundation for your sharpening toolkit.

We begin our whetstone sharpening process with a 400 grit stone to shape the edge of the blade and develop a burr along the edge of the knife. Once the shape is set and we have a burr along the full length of the knife we move on to the 1000 grit stone to refine the edge and begin removing the burr, followed by the 5000 grit fine stone stone to give a beautiful sharp edge on the blade. We finish off each knife on a leather stropping block which removes the final remnants of the burr and gives a strong and lasting edge.
★ MOST COMPLETE SET ON AMAZON – Our Sharpening Set is the only kit that comes with both a Flattening Stone and Angle Guide in addition to a Bonus E-Book (for sharpening tips and tricks) and Detailed Instruction Guide. Providing amazing value at a lower price than other sets. A Flattening Stone is a MUST have since all whetstones eventually become uneven and need to be flattened. This set completely eliminates the need to buy one later.
The quality of this dual diamond precision sharpener is legendary. You get one side with a fine diamond for razor sharp precision (the fine diamond) and the other side (extra fine) to hone your edges even more if need be. Even with this two tiered system, you can get a better edge more quickly than with single step systems. You also do not need to invest in any kind of special, hard to find oils to keep your sharpener working well. Just clean with water, and you can get years of service from the DMT W250EFNB 10-Inch DuoSharp Bench Stone Extra-Fine/Fine unit.

This multistage kitchen knife sharpener provides maximum safety and actively enhances the sharpness of premium quality kitchen knives. This sharpener works excellently on a variety of knives. Professional chefs around the globe use this tool to restore and polish the fine edge blades of Japanese style knives. You can read our full review of the Chef’s Choice 320 before making up your mind.


Warranty – It is absolutely vital to make sure that the manufacturer offers a good warranty! Although this might not matter so much with the others, it does for the electric knife sharpener! The internal motor and other components, which move about, can wear out. Since more things can go wrong here, you will want to make sure that the manufacturer backs up their product with a lengthy warranty.


The stick – With a stick sharpener hold the sharpener in front of you (facing away from you) with one hand and the handle in the other hand. Hold the base of the knife against the base of the tip at a slight angle and then push the blade along the stick pulling it across the stick at the same time. The tip of the blade should cross the end of the stick. To sharpen the other side of the blade place it under the stick and repeat the process making sure to reverse the angle at which you are holding the knife against the stick.
One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed] 

After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
A base for your whetstone should be included in any model you purchase. Considering you are using your whetstone after its been submerged in water; the stone tends to slide on most surfaces when you sharpen. The base, usually a rubber silicone anchor, will ensure that the stone does not move around. A slippery stone can be a hazardous situation. The goal is safety, however, some companies will take liberties to present a decorative base and forgo the safer option.

It lets the knife owners indulge in their ritualistic action of knife sharpening and have a firm control over the motion. It’s packed with a two-stage grinding wheel (Coarse and Fine) for effortless sharpening and top grade polishing. Its smart double-sided design allows you to sharpen both edges of straight blades. The exclusive fire-angle slot is exclusively added for serrated blades. It’s also popular as the best hunting knife sharpener for it’s compact nature and effectiveness even in the wild.
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