JapaneseChefsKnife.Com (JCK, Established in 2003) is the direct internet sales division of The Kencrest Corporation. We supply a wide range of top quality Japanese Chef's knives at lower than Japanese Retail Prices direct from Seki City; the Japanese cutlery capital where fine knives are produced using over 800 years of Samurai sword-making tradition and history.
Learning sharpening technique requires focus even without worrying about the stone itself. Stones that require frequent flattening, soaking and cleaning, or that take a long time to create an edge can be a source of frustration to some beginning sharpeners. Keep in mind your willingness perform regular maintenance when choosing a starting set of stones.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
The Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener is distinctly different from our main picks, not just in its obviously unique form but also in the way it sharpens. Whereas the others grind a new edge with rotating wheels, the Brød & Taylor model carves one with stationary tungsten-carbide stones. Some of the cheapest and worst sharpeners employ a similar method, but the Brød & Taylor’s clever design and precise construction allow it to deviate from the norm. After quickly carving an impressively keen, even edge on a dull knife, with a simple tilt of the blade you can then hone and polish the edge on those same tungsten-carbide stones, obtaining a durably sharp knife. And because this sharpener is compact and handsome, it can live on your countertop, so you’ll be more likely to keep up with regular knife maintenance. It’s the clear choice for style hounds.
Low Grit Stones: A sharpening stone with grit number less than a 1000 is generally used for knives and tools that are damaged. If your blade has any nicks or chips in the blade, the stones will take care of them in a jiffy! They usually have a coarse side for nicks and chips, with the other side for general sharpening. Even if the knife’s edge has become totally blunt, the stone will re-sharpen it perfectly.
It’s only the 2nd electric powered sharpener on our list but you can’t lose if you make the Chef’s Choice Trizor 15XV your sharpener of choice for double and single bevel Asian knives. This 3-stage sharpener provides something others don’t in that it converts any blade to a hyper-sharp 15 degree blade. The graduated manner by which it reaches that preferred angle also ensures the blade stays sharper, longer. And isn’t that the name of the game?
Your Budget – Budget and pricing will always be a factor no matter what you purchase. As already mentioned, some of these sharpeners are more expensive than others, but those that are tend to be much more convenient. Ultimately, this will come down to a personal choice. Make sure that you set a budget and stick with. By doing this, you will be able to get a solid product that won’t bankrupt you.
A diamond plate is a steel plate, sometimes mounted on a plastic or resin base, coated with diamond grit, an abrasive that will grind metal. When they are mounted they are sometimes known as diamond stones.[12] The plate may have a series of holes cut in it that capture the swarf cast off as grinding takes place, and cuts costs by reducing the amount of abrasive surface area on each plate. Diamond plates can serve many purposes including sharpening steel tools, and for maintaining the flatness of man-made waterstones, which can become grooved or hollowed in use. Truing (flattening a stone whose shape has been changed as it wears away) is widely considered essential to the sharpening process but some hand sharpening techniques utilise the high points of a non-true stone. As the only part of a diamond plate to wear away is a very thin coating of grit and adhesive, and in a good diamond plate this wear is minimal due to diamond's hardness, a diamond plate retains its flatness. Rubbing the diamond plate on a whetstone to true (flatten) the whetstone is a modern alternative to more traditional truing methods.[13]
The kind of tech we love: compact, reliable, durable, attractive and cheap. Purists may feel that other sharpeners will produce a more perfect result but for 99% of the human race this sharpener will be everything the doctor ordered. Your blades stay sharp for a good long time thanks to the 2-stage sharpening process and if you’re a left handed chef you’ll love the fact that it works just as effectively for you as for anyone else.
The biggest advantages of knife sharpening systems include customized settings, sharpening angle guide, multi-stage sharpening system and inbuilt safety features. You can tweak the settings and determine the grit factor of the abrasive on your own according to the structure of your knife. Additionally, these systems come with user guides in multiple languages for novices.
“I have many European and Asian knives. This is the first and (only) sharpener that sharpens them all — and does it better. Before I would never trust any electric sharpener to handle my custom Asian, Global one-sided and handmade fillet knives. This works. It makes short work of the European Henckels of the ’60s and ’70s (better than new). I had held off for the cost and wasted a few years with my stones. I doubt any knife person could be disappointed.”

I recommend keeping two stones in your kit. One with a medium grit (around 800 or so) to perform major sharpening jobs, and one with a fine grit (at least 2,000) to tune the edge to a razor-sharp finish. For real pros, a stone with an ultra-fine grit (8,000 and above) will leave a mirror-like finish on your blade, but most cooks won't notice the difference in terms of cutting ability.
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.
The continuous angle adjustment feature will allow you to select a specific angle from 17-30 degrees, in 1 degree increments, which will offer unlimited options. It also comes with 4 different sharpening diamond stones including the 140 extra-coarse, 300 coarse, 600 fine, and the 1500 extra fine. You will never be forced to purchase another sharpening stone to ensure that every coarse level is covered, because these diamond hones will perfect your blade edge, in no time at all.
The grit range is important only in regards to the type of knives you will sharpen. It is entirely up to the consumer and how they utilize their knives. Obviously you want a stone that is capable of sharpening all your blades to the appropriate sharpness. As a rule of thumb, the higher the grit, the more you will be able to get the finest razor's edge. However, this might mean several more swipes back and forth along the stone, which can be quite time consuming.
Modern synthetic stones are generally of equal quality to natural stones, and are often considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. For example, the proportional content of abrasive particles as opposed to base or "binder" materials can be controlled to make the stone cut faster or slower, as desired.[7] Natural stones are often prized for their natural beauty as stones and their rarity, adding value as collectors' items. Furthermore, each natural stone is different, and there are rare natural stones that contain abrasive particles in grit sizes finer than are currently available in artificial stones.[citation needed]

★ FAST SHARPENING AND NO OIL REQUIRED – Nobody wants to spend all day sharpening their knives and then cleaning up afterwards. This sharpener set will sharpen all knives and tools quickly and will make them sharper than the day you bought them. Since our stones don’t require oil, only water, there will be no messy cleanup and no need to worry about purchasing oil.


Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
Note that, unlike steel honing rods, ceramic hones need occasional cleaning, as particles of knife metal build up on their surface (they form a gray layer). Idahone sells a “Superaser,” but on knife forums, many owners of ceramic hones recommend generic melamine foam sponges as a more economical alternative (the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser is the famous name-brand version). Messermeister, the maker of one of the other ceramic hones in our test, recommends a mild abrasive cleanser, like Bon Ami or Bar Keepers Friend, advice that is also echoed by many knife enthusiasts.
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