Electric knife sharpeners are undoubtedly beneficial and very effective, but they also come with a few more concerns. This is the case, because they’re equipped with so many additional components. The internal motor is one such component. With this in mind, it is essential to explore all of the characteristics of each sharpener, before you make your decision. Below, you will find a breakdown of each of these for your convenience.

This multistage kitchen knife sharpener provides maximum safety and actively enhances the sharpness of premium quality kitchen knives. This sharpener works excellently on a variety of knives. Professional chefs around the globe use this tool to restore and polish the fine edge blades of Japanese style knives. You can read our full review of the Chef’s Choice 320 before making up your mind.
Rest your knife on the stone at your chosen angle. An easy method for determining the angle by eye is to visualize a 45 degree angle and then take half that amount. That will give you a ballpark estimate of the angle and then you can adjust accordingly up or down. With a slicing action bring the length of the knife across the stone with a motion that starts with the heel of the knife on the stone and ends with the point of the knife. The motion should resemble a sweeping arc pattern across your stone. Be very careful to maintain the angle of the knife on the stone. Longer curved knives provide additional challenges but as long as you can maintain the angle you will be sharpening very effectively. Repeat this process on the other side of the knife and continue repeating until you have sharpened your knife though all your stone grits.
We offer a series of oilstone packages that combine India and Arkansas stones and are very reasonably priced. At 8" long by 2" wide these stones are not as wide as some other types, but still wide enough for many edges and are plenty wide for knife sharpeners. Available in four price levels, these kits are a great opportunity for the beginning sharpener on a budget.
Our second entry from Chef’s Choice is the 463 Pronto Santoku. This manual sharpener is super-simple to use and delivers fast, high quality results every time. While this is a “2-stage” system there’s nothing complicated about it. One slot is for sharpening and the other for honing. Both stages utilize diamond abrasive surfaces so your blades will retain its edge for a good long time.
You can get surgically sharp edges from the Woodstock SteeleX D1130 1000 Grit and 6000 Grit Japanese Waterstone unit. People are also in love with Japanese waterstones, and there is a reason for that as well. You basically get two functions in one when you use them – polishing and sharpening at the same time. They are also much easier to take care of. You do not have to invest in specialized oils to lubricate the stones; they actually prefer water. All in all, this is one of the easiest manual sharpeners to use, and one of the most durable as well. If you are looking for a quick cutting edge that will get you back to work in the least amount of time, then the Woodstock SteeleX D1130 1000 Grit and 6000 Grit Japanese Waterstone is the tool for you.
We tend to recommend natural Japanese water stones only to experienced users who are thoroughly familiar with the synthetic Japanese sharpening stones. Natural stones are not to everybody’s taste and there are inevitably many uncertainties with regard to their grit grade, which cannot be determined exactly, their hardness and their suitability for certain types of steel.
Japanese waterstones are quite popular among the woodworkers. A waterstone is capable of acquiring razor-sharpness with minimal effort. In D1130, there are two stones of 1000 and 6000 grit. Buffing knives against water stones gives a blade a shiny, mirror-like finishing along with super-sharp edges. You need to soak the stone in water before using it.
I am completely satisfied with the quality and value of this product. I have been able to get my kitchen knives "scary sharp". I can slice ripe tomatos almost paper thin with very little pressure. Thank you for the prompt delivery as well. I haven't tried the blade guide yet but I am sure it would work satisfactorily as it has rollers on either side and may even prolong the life of the stone and having to use the flattening stone as often.
This premium tool comes with a double-sided premium quality whetstone that has a course 1000 grit and a fine 6000 grit. The 1000 grit stone performs very well through getting all the nicks and chips out of the blade and the 6000 grit puts a nice smooth polished finish. This best blade sharpener has a bamboo base for holding the stone steadily while sharpening is done. It also includes a knife sharpening angle guide which is really handy.
The Japanese waterstones help you achieve sharp edges much more quickly than other types of stones, and they have the effect of polishing a blade as it is honed. You only need water to get your cutting edge lubricated, which makes the maintenance of this unit before a job incredibly simple. Woodworkers can also use the Woodstock SteeleX D1130 1000 Grit and 6000 Grit Japanese Waterstone for an aggressive cut that cannot be achieved through any other method.
You get a great deal of life from this stone, regardless of the type of knife that you plan on sharpening. You can also sharpen a multitude of different knives with just a slight change in pressure. The synthetic sharpening stone is made from silicon carbide and aluminum for more versatility during sharpening. No matter what kind of steel you are sharpening, you have a guarantee of performance.

As the video of our test shows, the Trizor XV took a very dull, very heavy (and slightly bent) 12-inch Wüsthof chef’s knife and made it tomato-slicing sharp. Setting the new edge took about 20 strokes on the coarse wheel; the fine and polishing steps took about 10 and five strokes respectively. All told, the process was perhaps three minutes of work. The motor was impressively powerful, never allowing the sharpening wheels to bog down or “catch” in the metal of the knife. It sharpened blades to within about ⅜ inch of the heel—as with the manual ProntoPro 4643, excellent performance, and a testament to the attention that Chef’sChoice pays to overall design throughout its extensive product range. This sharpening of virtually the entire blade is important. Without it, not only do you lose the ability to cut with the heel of the knife—especially useful when you’re cutting tough root vegetables, where employing the heel provides stability and pressure—but also over time the blade edge develops a “dish,” or dip, that prevents the rear portion of the blade from contacting the cutting board and slicing all the way through a food item.


The synthetic stone is constructed out of aluminum oxide, which is a very abrasive material, but very soft. The main difference between the India and synthetic water stone is the binder that securely holds the abrasive material together. This stone will definitely offer an extremely quick cut. The way this works is the old abrasive material will break away and then will be replaced by a fresh sharp material.
For this type of hand held manual sharpener the 463 does an extraordinary job thanks mostly to the diamond abrasive wheels. You get an edge that’s both razor sharp and burr-free, as if you spent an hour working the edge on an oil stone. If people make a mistake with the 463 it’s that they assume more pressure is needed than actually is. Keep in mind though that it really shines on serrated and straight edged, double bevel Asian-style knives.

There is very little doubt that Chef’s Choice is responsible for some of the great  knife sharpeners on the market. The Chef’s Choice 320 falls within this category, as well. It is somewhat more expensive than other kitchen knife sharpeners, but it offers a wealth of extra benefits and features. With a 2-stage sharpening system, you can rest assured knowing that this sharpener will get your blades sharp, without damaging them!
The stick – With a stick sharpener hold the sharpener in front of you (facing away from you) with one hand and the handle in the other hand. Hold the base of the knife against the base of the tip at a slight angle and then push the blade along the stick pulling it across the stick at the same time. The tip of the blade should cross the end of the stick. To sharpen the other side of the blade place it under the stick and repeat the process making sure to reverse the angle at which you are holding the knife against the stick.

This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.


I first received my Kamikoto knife as a gift. I have found my new favorite knife! I am very pleased with the balanced grip, which in itself is a work of ergonomic art. I have never used a single bevel blade before and, after a bit of experimenting, find it an improvement for several tasks. Based on my experience with the Kamikoto knife, I purchased the Knife Set for my son who is a graduate chef of many years experience. He also is very pleased with his gift.
The Japanese sharpening stone whetstone combo is about 9.1 in. in length. It's  multi-sided and actually looks like a block of wood. When you use the dark side or the medium grit side (#1000), soak it for about 2-3 minutes.  When finished, the ridge on the base which surrounds the stone will fit snugged into it. Even if the base wasn't there the stones friction will stay. Some of the good features of the base is actually the rubber stoppers to hold it on a dry surface. When you learn how to sharpen a pocket knife, doing it on one of these will help.
JapaneseChefsKnife.Com (JCK, Established in 2003) is the direct internet sales division of The Kencrest Corporation. We supply a wide range of top quality Japanese Chef's knives at lower than Japanese Retail Prices direct from Seki City; the Japanese cutlery capital where fine knives are produced using over 800 years of Samurai sword-making tradition and history.

There will be a drawer that extends into the mechanism under the abrasives. Any detritus from the sharpening process drops into this drawer. Exactly where the drawer is located will differ from sharpener to sharpener but it shouldn’t be hard to find. Remove the drawer flick any material into the wastebasket and then wipe out the drawer with a damp cloth or tissue. You may want to use work gloves and goggles to protect your hands and eyes from any loose metal shavings. Once the drawer is clean and dry replace it. The exact means by which the sharpening mechanism itself is cleaned will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Consult your owners guide for specific details. Make sure you don’t introduce any grease or other lubricants into the sharpener unless specifically directed to do so by the owner’s manual. Also, the outside of the sharpener should come perfectly clean with just a damp cloth. Avoid using commercial cleaners or abrasives of any kind.
Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...
A well made and Versatile Chef's Knife I received this in 2 days with prime, and it arrived in perfect shape.This is a marvelous Chefs knife! I find it well balanced, and very sharp.It does require some knowledge on how to sharpen the one-sided bevel on the blade, but once you learn it's easy to maintain a razor sharp edge! I also really appreciate the wood box it comes in.The slight curve of the blade also makes it ideal to ""rock"" when finely chopping herbs. Very Pleased.
A hybrid manual-electric sharpener, the Chef’sChoice Hybrid 210 uses a motor and abrasive wheels to grind the new edge and employs a manual stage to hone it. This sharpener is eminently affordable. However, our top pick, the ProntoPro 4643 multi-blade-angle manual model (as well as its $30 to $40 single-blade-angle kin) produces a better edge and doesn’t make us worry about breakdowns the way the Hybrid 210’s lightweight motor does.
Made in the USA means a lot! It sharpens quickly, whether you need to remove a lot or just a "tune up" on the blade edges. Because it's manufactured flat, it is excellent for planer blades and chisels. The ability to sharpen dry or with only water creates less of a mess than other types of sharpening stones. The no-hassle guarantee is a definite plus, though I would be surprised if you ever needed it.
If no metal is being removed from the edge of the blade, it’s considered honing. Whereas if metal is being removed from the blade edge this is considered sharpening. Certainly, even honing will result in some microscopic amounts of metal being removed from the blade edge but not enough to be visible to the human eye, so the above definition is basically a solid one.
This is a good quality stone for a beginner looking to learn about hand sharpening knives and blades. It holds up well, especially for the price point. New sharpeners are prone to gouging and scratching stones, pushing too hard, etc, and this stone handles the abuse nicely. The no slip base is very effective at cementing the stone in place, which is a critical safety feature.

This is the one tool that services every knife sharpening need in your kitchen. It looks great, works durably and is easy to clean. If you want to experiment with knife edges from different cultures, this is the tool for you. You can also bring your old knives back from the dead, which will pay for the expense of the sharpener with a single application. The Chef’s Choice 1520 AngleSelect Diamond Hone Electric Knife Sharpener also comes with one of the best and most accurate “how to sharpen a knife” manuals of any product on the market.


Cost – While you can get a perfectly serviceable sharpening stick or stone sharpener for short money and some very high-quality tabletop manual 2 and 3-stage sharpeners for less than $50, high-quality mechanical systems will often run you $200 or even more. While that’s not so much money it’s likely to impact the quality of your life it is a lot to pay to keep a decent edge on your knives. While how much you ultimately pay for a sharpener is entirely up to you, you may want to consider your commitment to cooking and how often you are actually liable to use the device. If this is your first sharpener you might also want to consider learning how to sharpen a blade using a classic stick or stone sharpener first, before deciding if moving up to a mechanical sharpener is the right thing for you.
Sharpening stones have been around since the dawn of civilization for a very good reason: they work. Yes, they’re more labor intensive than most electric sharpeners but they also allow you an unprecedented level of control. Once you get used to something like the Fallkniven DC3 Diamond/Ceramic Whetstone Sharpener you may never take out your electric sharpener again.
A: Like cars, knife sharpeners run the gamut from basic to luxury and like cars the price can vary from extremely affordable to more than some people might want to spend. You can get a high quality sharpener that will put your knives through a 2 or 3-stage process which will result in an incredibly sharp edge for less than $20. Or you can buy a mechanical sharpener that will produce a virtually flawless edge for $200+.
Edges lose their sharpness for the very purpose they cater to. Cutting acidic fruits and vegetables like lemon, tomato causes corrosion in the blades. Knives are often used to accomplish tasks they’re not meant to perform, like scraping or opening tin cans. Blade buckling is also a very common kind of damage your knife faces every now and then. It happens due to slicing items heavier than the knife itself or crushing ice. Keeping the knife in high temperature or washing it with harsh chemical based detergents also has havocking effects on the sharpness. Taking proper care of your cooking combat hunting knife is the only way to prevent it from fraying. Always select a suitable knife for the task, avoid heavy wooden cut boards and wash it immediately with cold water right after using.
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