Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
It looks like it can be a Sci-Fi film prop. This is a 2 stage type of sharpening system. You'll get a non slip cushion with it which is at the bottom offering stability for the user. It's ergonomic handle provides a comfortable and easy grip. This cushion offers the stability needed when sharpening and polishing your pocket knife to it's absolute razor sharpness. The sharpener does the work as you hold down the grip and simply place your pocket knife to get sharpened by the motions of the ceramic and diamond sharpener wheels. Simply run your dull knives through the device and you'll get the results you've been looking for. This one will definitely help you when you learn how to sharpen a pocket knife on the Priority Chef.
You’ll know you’re reached a stopping point when you can feel the slight catch of the bevel on the edge of the blade, by carefully running your finger in the direction of the blade, or by cutting through a sheet of paper. When the knife cuts cleanly through the paper, it’s time to hone the blade. Read our guide for more information about honing vs sharpening.
The McGowan Diamond Stone Electric Knife Sharpener definitely has the potential to be an all-in-one knife sharpener for even the most discerning of kitchens. The one caveat is that this precision may be to much for the amateur who is just looking for a bit of performance. Take it upon yourself to understand the needs of your kitchen, and if you are looking for Food Network levels of performance, then the McGowan may be just the knife sharpener for you.
“Great knife-edge maintainer!!! This is the best sharpener I’ve used for keeping a keen edge on your best kitchen knives. It’s primarily for the last step in maintaining a keen edge on the knives you use every day. It’s not for neglected knives that need a significant amount of metal removed. This would be great for maintaining a new set of quality cutlery. If you are looking for perfection to keep your best knives in top shape, this is the unit to get … I find that half to one dozen strokes every so often will keep your knives as sharp as the day you got them.”

I’ve been sharpening knives since I was 9 or 10 years old, starting with a Browning pocket knife that I still carry. Later, working on a cattle ranch, I was at various times responsible for keeping the butcher’s knives and the boarding house’s kitchen knives in good working order using Arkansas oilstones. I’ve been cooking for myself for almost 20 years, and I’ve been keeping my trusty santoku shaving-sharp that whole time using Japanese waterstones (more on those in How we picked). So I appreciate a truly fine edge. But I’m also big on the Korean concept of koenchanayo (“that’s good enough”), and so for the past seven years I’ve also used an electric sharpener for my cheap, stamped-steel paring knives (which Wirecutter’s Lesley Stockton also loves) and for my expensive, forged heavy chef’s knife. In short: I’m not one of those knife geeks for whom nothing less than an atom-splitting edge is acceptable. The defining characteristic of a sharp knife is that it cuts neatly, easily, and safely in its intended tasks—and there’s more than one way to get an edge that sharp.
However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.
You can select a whetstone sharpening stone from various materials that are hard enough not to break. Look for a sharpening stone diamond or one of the ceramic sharpening stones available. You can also select icutlery sharpeners from steel, stone or Tungsten carbide. They are all designed to provide a sharp edge to knives, but have a unique look. While many of them are created to be practical, some may have a decorative look, making them a nice gift for someone or for you to display around your kitchen.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
Stones are divided into hard oilstones (often called Arkansas stones), which use mineral oil or kerosene as a lubricant, and soft (often called Japanese) waterstones, which use water as a lubricant. Whereas the hard oilstones rely on directly abrading the knife steel, the soft waterstones wear away rapidly as you sharpen, producing an abrasive slurry that cuts the new edge; they work more quickly, but you have to regularly reflatten them by rubbing them against a sheet of glass. With both kinds, you have to set and maintain the sharpening angle using only your eyes and hands, and any sloppiness can quickly produce a rounded edge that will hardly cut butter. Doing it right is not all that hard once you get the knack, but there’s a difficult initial learning curve. You also need at least two stones, coarse and fine, to do a proper job—and good stones aren’t cheap. And both oilstones and waterstones make a bit of a mess in use and take a lot more time to set a new edge than the sharpening tools we recommend here—10 to 20 minutes versus three minutes or less.
The final Chef’s Choice sharpener on our list is the 316 Diamond Sharpener. Like the 15XV the 316 is at its best when used to sharpen Asian-style knives and it does so with unflinching effectiveness and speed. This is a compact, 2-stage electric sharpener that produces the 15 degree edge so favored in Asian cutlery. Ideal for the preparation of sashimi or sushi.

This device will fulfill all of your needs in the kitchen. For instance, it is capable of sharpening American and European blades, as well as Asian knives! Of course, it doesn’t stop there either! It works perfectly for straight and serrated knives. In fact, it works for single and double bevel knives too. Once the job has been finished, you’ll be able to remove the panel and empty the shavings. Although the device is slightly more expensive, the features and performance of this sharpener definitely justify that price!
There are two broad classifications of knife sharpeners — manual and electrical knife sharpener. The former is mostly used by the most seasoned professionals since it requires a lot of patience and skill. An electric sharpener is a worthy substitute of the manual ones for professional chefs and busy housewives who don’t have the privilege to spend hours on sharpening their knives. After reading about the pros and cons of both of these, you’ll hopefully be able to pick the best knife sharpener for your specific requirements.
This particular silver / black sharpener is a guided sharpening tool for any professional. When using it, you'll be able to get all your pocket knives and kitchen knives to it's sharpest. There's 3 stages to it and is easily accessible to use at home. - These are the sharpening processes: coarse-grinding, medium grinding, and the extra-fine grit ceramic wheel grinder. The last one is the polisher. The blade gets polished to it's finest point. Additionally, the blade guides are interchangeable with the some of the best angles without having to guess at all those technical angles. The blade will be guided by the automatic mechanism once you lay it in the grooves. How to sharpen a pocket knife on a Presto electric knife sharpener will be effortless.
The development of knife sharpening systems has revolutionized the entire affair of knife sharpening. It is the unbeatable combination of modern and traditional technology that has contributed to the astounding success of these knife sharpening systems. It’s the best knife sharpener for housewives who neither have the time nor scope to perform the rigorous task of manual sharpening, as they have finally found a solution for their dull knives.
This pocket-sized tool sharpens knives using carbide sharpening blades, then gives the knife a smooth finish using ceramic blades. A diamond rod is used for honing knives or for sharpening serrated knives. This is a great tool to keep in the toolkit, the tackle box, or to carry along when camping. Since it’s small, your hands will be close to your sharp knife blades as you work, so you might want to save it for occasional use rather than for sharpening all of your kitchen knives on a regular basis.
Overall, using one of these machines is entirely effortless and easy. You only need a single hand, which cannot be said for the models above. Once you’ve got the sharpener and the knife, you will be able to adjust the settings on the machine. Remember that each individual model will have a variety of different settings to play around with. Once you’ve got them set to your particular preferences, you’ll be able to insert the blade into the sharpener and allow the machine’s motor to do all of the work.
Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
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