Your Speed Requirements – How quick do you need this device to operate? Do you need it to get the job done, within seconds? Or, do you have more time to spare? Remember that each individual sharpener works at a different pace. For those that need something much speedier, it is best to stick with an electric or pull-through sharpener. Both are much quicker than their competitors.


High Grit Stones: These are also known as finishing stones with the number range going up to 8000, and give you a super refined edge.  They work great with Western knives as they cutting edge resembles a “U” as opposed to a “V”. If you are using your knife to cut meat, then you can happily stop at 4000 or 6000 grit. If you are only using it for vegetables or fruit go all the way to the 8000.
Everyone who owns a knife needs a sharpener. Even the highest-quality knife will lose its edge over time and with use. The metal wears away on the cutting board, it chips on animal bones and bends on tough root vegetables, and it dissolves in the acids and salts of the kitchen. A dull knife is a dangerous knife. To keep it safe, and to keep a knife working, you need to sharpen it regularly.
In most cases, the sharper, the better. The sharpness of your edge is determined by the angle (the lower the angle, the sharper the edge) and how fine of a grit you choose for your final honing. Since you have already determined your angle many steps earlier, now you just need to know which grit you can stop at. This again depends on the use of the knife. In most cases, go all the way to the finest stone that you own as this will give you your best edge. The only exception would be a knife used to cut soft vegetables like tomatoes, as a slightly more coarse edge will provide more of a tooth pattern for easier cutting.

Using the coarse side of the stone, hold the blade at a 15° – 20° angle. It’s important to maintain the same angle the entire time you sharpen. Applying a light but even pressure, move the blade back and forth across the length of the stone. It all depends on how dull your blade starts, but you’ll probably need quite a few back and forths. To finish off, give the blade a couple quick swipes on the corner of the stone to knock off any burrs.
Before we start, I want to make clear that there are dozens of different ways to sharpen a knife. Everyone has a way they think is best, and men have all sorts  of techniques and tools that they feel are essential in getting a sharp blade. In the end, much of it comes down to personal preference. I’m going to show you the way I learned how to sharpen a pocket knife. It’s very basic, good for beginners, and best of all, it works. If you have an alternative method that you prefer, great. Share it with us in the comments. I’d love to hear your tips.
However, it should also be noted that “water stones” are generally significantly softer than oil stones and thus, water stones generally cut faster than oil stones but, they also have to be flattened more often that oil stones do. Furthermore, it should be noted that some water stones must be soaked in water for several hours prior to use whereas, others are of the “splash and sharpen” variety and thus, they only need to be soaked for a few minutes before use and then wetted down occasionally during sharpening process. Diamond hones on the other hand are more durable than either water stones or oil stones and, because they generally have a more coarse grit, they cut faster than natural whetstones. Plus, due to their construction, they never need truing and, in fact, coarse diamond hones are often used to flatten both natural and synthetic whetstones.
I’ve been sharpening knives since I was 9 or 10 years old, starting with a Browning pocket knife that I still carry. Later, working on a cattle ranch, I was at various times responsible for keeping the butcher’s knives and the boarding house’s kitchen knives in good working order using Arkansas oilstones. I’ve been cooking for myself for almost 20 years, and I’ve been keeping my trusty santoku shaving-sharp that whole time using Japanese waterstones (more on those in How we picked). So I appreciate a truly fine edge. But I’m also big on the Korean concept of koenchanayo (“that’s good enough”), and so for the past seven years I’ve also used an electric sharpener for my cheap, stamped-steel paring knives (which Wirecutter’s Lesley Stockton also loves) and for my expensive, forged heavy chef’s knife. In short: I’m not one of those knife geeks for whom nothing less than an atom-splitting edge is acceptable. The defining characteristic of a sharp knife is that it cuts neatly, easily, and safely in its intended tasks—and there’s more than one way to get an edge that sharp.
The manual knife sharpener is likely one of the easiest to use. Although the electric is easier, the pull-through sharpener is very close behind. The process is very simple, but it will still require two hands, in most cases. Grab the sharpener’s handle and hold it tightly to the table. While holding it securely, you will want to grab the handle of the knife and pull it through the sharpener. This process can be repeated, until the blade’s edge matches your requirements. Overall, the process is simple and can be completed within a matter of seconds.
Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 

When I decided I wanted to learn to sharpen my own knives, I was overwhelmed by the sheer volume of sharpening supplies and in my ignorance at the time, I thought I needed everything I could get my hands on, the more I had the sharper the knives would be. That was a mistake. Today, I rely on just a handful of good products, I use them every single day of the week.
In terms of feedback, in the eyes, and in the hands of many sharpeners, the feedback on this particular brand of stones is not to their liking and often it is enough to stop them from using them. These are thinner than other stones as well so you may get the impression that you are not getting your moneys worth. They are very hard stones, there is no soft, creamy sensation as you sharpen, there is not much feedback at all in fact.

I enjoy these stones so much that the feedback is not a deterrent at all for me, I don’t even think about it. The results are always nothing but top notch, they deliver exactly what I want, some of the sharpest knives I have ever produced were sharpened on Shapton Glass stones. They may be thinner but they last a very long time, they are easy to maintain as well,


In narrowing our choices down to a manageable number, we consulted reviews and expertise on professional-knife sites (including Chef Knives To Go and The Epicurean Edge), as well as on Amazon and other retailer sites. We consulted with Wirecutter staff for their preferences and concerns. And as is often the case, Cook’s Illustrated proved to be a valuable resource with its in-depth sharpener tests and reviews (subscription required). Finally, we used factors such as manufacturer warranties and product availability to refine our choices, and in the end we had seven models—four electric, three manual—to test.
Good article, but pull through sharpeners remove way too much material. Great for cheap knives but not so great for your good knives. Also, sharpening steels really don’t sharpen. As you use your knife the microscopic edge will bend and twist making the edge less sharp. A steel straightens that edge without removing material. You’ll often see butches and chefs using the steel a lot as they work. Keeps the edge sharp without wearing the knife down.
For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)
When you want to learn how to sharpen a pocket-knife on a sharpening stone, your pocket knife isn't going to get sharp in one stroke. You have to have at least a stone bar that's the minimum of 2x6 inches in measurement. In general, it'll help make the sharpening of the blade easier. When you sharpen it on a stone, you have the three main options: ceramic stones, whetstones, and diamond stones.
This medium grit (1000 grit) Japanese waterstone model is crafted to perfection to perform sharpening, honing and polishing efficiently. It helps in the removal of the metal from the blades in order to reprofile the edges. The 1000 grit abrasive stone makes sharpening a less time-consuming process. However, you need a lot of practice to hold the equipment in a right position while honing.
For instance, American Novaculite (aka Washita and Arkansas Stones) is a form of metamorphic Chert that produces some of the best known and best loved natural whetstones in existence. Then, there is a form of Belgian Coticule which has been known for providing extra-keen edges since Roman times and, there is a Japanese Siliciclastic sedimentary stone (aka Japanese Water Stones) which consist of a fine silicate particles suspended in a clay matrix. Plus, there are also various types of man-made whetstones available such as Silicon Carbide (aka Crystalon) stones and Aluminum Oxide (aka India Stones) as well as a synthetic Corundum (aka Ruby) rod and Aluminum Oxide impregnated ceramic rods as well as several different types of diamond hones.
This sleek, powerful automatic knife sharpening system has a spherical bearing rod guide for easy adjustment and close proximity between the knife and the rod. The cherry hardwood pistol grip provides ultimate comfort and great control over the tool. The key selling point of this product is the incorporation of one fine, one medium, and one extra coarse sharpening stone.
The Chef’s Choice 15 Trizor XV EdgeSelect is one of the best reviewed knife sharpeners on the market, and for good reason. If you have invested in high quality knives over the years, then this is the sharpener that you need to keep that investment in good shape. The unit is not the easiest to use at first, and it is not the best buy for every kitchen. However, if you are looking for performance that is slightly better than the norm, you will definitely get it from the Trizon.
The Suehiro Knife Sharpening Guide comes with an eraser whetstone, which can be used to clean your whetstones after use or remove rust from knives that have developed a patina. Sharp knives are safer to use, produce finer cuts and reduce bruising of delicate produce. Anyone who is using kitchen knives should endeavour to keep them sharp. The Suehiro Knife Sharpening Guide will certainly help anyone looking to learn to sharpen knives on whetstones.
After you have completed a few passes over the stone on both sides, you can move to the final stage. This time it is P1 pressure, just enough pressure for you to control the knife. Ensure your stone is wet and now repeat the motions but with very very light pressure. You really need to focus here and ensure you are reaching the edge of the edge and again, just a few sweeps on both sides of the knife.
4. Start sharpening the first side of the blade. With your blade set at the prefect angle, you’re ready to start sharpening. Imagine you’re carving off a slim piece of the stone’s surface. Personally, I bring the blade into the stone. Other people stroke the blade away from the stone. Both ways work, so just use whatever technique you prefer. If the knife blade is curved or if it’s longer than the stone, you’ll need to sweep the blade sideways as you work, so the entire edge is sharpened evenly. Apply moderate pressure as you sharpen. No need to bear down hard on the blade. After you make one stroke, start back at the beginning and repeat. Do this about 6-12 times.

There are three fundamental kinds of manual sharpeners available in the market – sharpener stones, rods and sharpener steel stones. Sharpening stones have been extensively used in honing blades and knives from the ancient times. These rectangular shaped stone blocks are made from diamond, ceramic or other natural sharpening stones. Drawing a dull knife on a gritty stone erases a lot of materials that causes fraying. Remember, it’s mandatory to use a heavier stone than the knife material. Natural sharpening stones come in fine, moderate and rough coarse. Here’s my pick of the top 5 sharpening stones:
The Brød & Taylor Pocket Knife Sharpener (which is no longer available) uses the same carbide stones as the full-size model noted above, and it sharpens and hones just as well. It would make a solid, pocketable tool for campers, hunters, and anglers. But this compact model is not stable enough for long or heavy kitchen knives, and you can’t engage the spring-loaded arms in order to use a polishing function.
Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.

At first, you need to grip the tool or lock it in a vice to prevent slipping. You can also add some honing oil to the grit on the side of the Puck. Next, you should grasp the Puck firmly with the thumb and the fingers whilst supporting it by the palm of your strong hand. Then you move the Puck in a circular motion as you move along the whole cutting edge that needs to be sharpened.


This mighty, sleek model from Buck knives has a diamond coated sharpening surface teamed up with one fine sided 1200 grit, a 750 medium and a 325 grit coarse side. The tapered handle allows firm control and ultra light weight gives it amazing mobility. Overall, it’s certainly a brilliant sharpening equipment for achieving extreme sharpness on short blades and tools.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.

Low Grit Stones: A sharpening stone with grit number less than a 1000 is generally used for knives and tools that are damaged. If your blade has any nicks or chips in the blade, the stones will take care of them in a jiffy! They usually have a coarse side for nicks and chips, with the other side for general sharpening. Even if the knife’s edge has become totally blunt, the stone will re-sharpen it perfectly.
This sleek, powerful automatic knife sharpening system has a spherical bearing rod guide for easy adjustment and close proximity between the knife and the rod. The cherry hardwood pistol grip provides ultimate comfort and great control over the tool. The key selling point of this product is the incorporation of one fine, one medium, and one extra coarse sharpening stone.
My Fujiwara is an exceptional cutter and a pure joy to use, as a result, the mediocre knives get a pretty good break and the dream knife gets to do the lions share of food preparation. So it gets duller faster. However, it goes without saying that superior steel will have improved edge retention but at the end of the day, knives get dull, they just do and I am very happy about that, I get to sharpen them over and over!
“I bought this to sharpen a number of knives. From kitchen knives to pocket knives, and even a couple of large Bowie knives. It handled all of them with ease and made them all razor-sharp again — even the small knife on my multi-tool that other sharpeners failed to sharpen. Great little tool to keep and carry. The small size makes it easy to take anywhere.”
Your primary goal is just to improve the edge, make it a little bit sharper. Manage you’re expectations and don’t worry about getting the knife ready for eye surgery on day one. Ignore all those YouTube videos where you see folks performing miracles with their knives, forget that completely. You just want to make the knife a little less dull and by doing so you will achieve what most people will never even attempt. You want to get a taste of sharpening success and it can happen quickly. If you are reading this, or any other cool sharpening tips, you’re on the right path.
Most kitchen knife sharpeners are easy to convenient to store in a medium-sized kitchen. Kitchen knives cater to basic culinary functions like cutting, dicing, and coating. If not taken care of properly, the edges are bound to get worn out. A blunt kitchen knife is prone to slip off the vegetables and cut your finger instead. It also affects the appearance and taste of the dish to a great extent. If you are a restaurant chef who doesn’t like to compromise with his standards, a good kitchen knife sharpener will be your companion for life. Ease of use and cost are the two main factors you should keep in view while picking up the best knife sharpener for your kitchen. Realize your priority and choose wisely.
The manual knife sharpener is likely one of the easiest to use. Although the electric is easier, the pull-through sharpener is very close behind. The process is very simple, but it will still require two hands, in most cases. Grab the sharpener’s handle and hold it tightly to the table. While holding it securely, you will want to grab the handle of the knife and pull it through the sharpener. This process can be repeated, until the blade’s edge matches your requirements. Overall, the process is simple and can be completed within a matter of seconds.
Our test of the Brød & Taylor turned a dull blade into one that effortlessly and cleanly sliced both tomatoes and paper. Due to the reputation of V-notch carbide sharpeners, however, I was concerned about the durability of the edge, so I did an additional test: I used the Brød & Taylor to sharpen my old pocketknife, which uses 440C steel, one of the earliest knife-worthy stainless alloys and one that more refined alloys have since surpassed. I then made 50 slices through a cardboard box, rehoned and repolished the knife (but did not resharpen it), and made 50 more slices. After all that, I was still able to slice a tomato and peel an apple without problem. That’s impressive: Cardboard is so tough on blade edges that knifesmiths use it as a kind of stress test.

It helps you get the knack for a consistently correct angle BUT the idea falls apart a bit when it comes to the curve and taper part of the knife and if your knife has an excessively narrow (slicer/boner) or wide (cleaver) width. It will also mark up the sides of your knife which may bother some who are obsessed with the cosmetic appearance of their $150+ Japanese knives--I could care less.
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