Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.
This is a good quality stone for a beginner looking to learn about hand sharpening knives and blades. It holds up well, especially for the price point. New sharpeners are prone to gouging and scratching stones, pushing too hard, etc, and this stone handles the abuse nicely. The no slip base is very effective at cementing the stone in place, which is a critical safety feature.
You will never have to worry about a flat stone, if you use the ceramic sharpener, since the material is very durable and ultra-hard. There is one downside to using this type of sharpening stone and that is, it is most often not available in a coarse grade. If you are lucky enough to find a coarse grade ceramic stone, you will be disappointed, by the “glaze” build up, which will cause the stone to lose its effectiveness. Of course, it will take a while, before the “glaze” begins to build up, but it is inevitable.
Steel – In most cases, the sharpening steels are made from steel or ceramic. Each can effectively hone your blade, but they work differently. Quite frankly, the steel models are quickly being replaced by the much more convenient and quick ceramic. The steel is used in the same manner and looks identical, but it is a little harsher than the ceramic.
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I love sharing information, please never hesitate to comment if you are stuck or need some advice on water stones. Speaking of that, if you have more than one stone, start with the coarse and end with the fine stones and repeat the process on each stone. However, you only need P4 pressure on that first stone, the the Raising of the Burr Pressure. After that, keep it moderate to light.
Honing steels are another story altogether. Honing steels are those instruments that look light a saber (light or otherwise) which you use to gussy up the edge of the blade periodically before using it. These do wear out every few years or less, depending on how often you use them. If you are unsure whether your honing steel is worn out run your finger around it. If it feels smooth all the way around then it’s time for a replacement. Not to worry though, they’re really affordable. One thing you may want to keep in mind about honing steels is that they typically won’t do much to hone the edge of some super hard knives, such as Japanese Global brand knives.
These particular types of sharpeners can be used for various knife varieties, but they’re most commonly utilized for kitchen knives. There is no doubt that having one of these sharpeners readily available in your kitchen can be very advantageous. When choosing one of these sharpeners, make sure to choose a good brand, such as Chef’s Choice or KitchenIQ.
For chefs of all skill levels, it is absolutely vital to have a good sharpener in the kitchen. Of course, you need a specific type of sharpener with precise characteristics. You need one that works with your knives! It is also vital to choose one that works quickly and accurately. You don’t want to end up with a blade that has been deformed by the sharpener. Below, you will be able to find a breakdown of some of the very best kitchen knife sharpeners on the market. 
With its premium series Select II, the whetstone manufacturer Sigma Power Corporation from Tokyo addresses users of high-alloy steels such as HSS. These stones, too, are obviously intended to engender a grinding experience similar to that of natural stones. The special production process is expensive, but the Sigma Select II probably has no equal when it comes to demolishing steel.
I have been looking for water stones for a while and was pleased to find the two sided set from Budo Enterprises. I ordered the set and it arrived in two days as promised. I immediately put it to the test and the results were excellent. In the past I had separate 800 and 2000 grit stones, and having the 1000 and 4000 grit stones together is much more efficient. It was a good purchase.

Various Angles – If you want to ensure that you’ll be able to achieve the exact edge that you’re after, you’ll want to make sure to choose a manual knife sharpener that is equipped with an angle adjuster. Typically, this will appear as a knob and you’ll be able to turn it to adjust the degree of the angle. Choosing one of these devices, with a wide range of angles, is a very smart choice. The Smith’s Adjustable Manual Knife Sharpener is a good buy here.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
Using the coarse side of the stone, hold the blade at a 15° – 20° angle. It’s important to maintain the same angle the entire time you sharpen. Applying a light but even pressure, move the blade back and forth across the length of the stone. It all depends on how dull your blade starts, but you’ll probably need quite a few back and forths. To finish off, give the blade a couple quick swipes on the corner of the stone to knock off any burrs.
“Wow!!!! I am completely blown away. Just got this device this afternoon. And it works incredibly well. Sharpened all of my knives in less than 15 minutes. The blades are razor-sharp. The suction cup holds perfectly and is very stable. I have an electric professional sharpener with two honing blades, and this mighty midget outperforms it hands down. The only concern I have is for durability and longevity. It is mostly plastic, except the blades for sharpening and the rubber suction cup. This could limit its overall life span. What the heck — for the price, you could easily buy another one, or two. I love it!”
Sharpening stone/whetstones. Just as there are dozens of different ways to sharpen a knife, there are dozens of different sharpening stones. There are Japanese water stones, stones with diamond encrusted surfaces, and stones with different grades of grit. Again, choosing a stone is a matter of function and preference. Play around with different kinds of stones to find the one that gives you the results you’re looking for.
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