Whether you’re purchasing a Smith’s or Zwilling J.A. Henckels pull-through knife sharpener, you will want to make sure that you look at the item carefully! Although each of these are similarly made and work the same, they’re also very different. Suffice to say, some will be better as an overall investment. Since you want to obtain the best pull-through knife sharpener, you will want to explore each of the characteristics below!
Diamond sharpening stone delivers fast cutting and sharp edges. They are tougher in material and doesn’t flatten. Therefore, it is the best way on investment if you want such of the sharpener that easy to maintain and practical to use. Diamond sharpening stone doesn’t require water other than a spill. It is also applicable to use with lubrication if you wish to.
I first received my Kamikoto knife as a gift. I have found my new favorite knife! I am very pleased with the balanced grip, which in itself is a work of ergonomic art. I have never used a single bevel blade before and, after a bit of experimenting, find it an improvement for several tasks. Based on my experience with the Kamikoto knife, I purchased the Knife Set for my son who is a graduate chef of many years experience. He also is very pleased with his gift.
Sharpening stones are designed to sharpen scissors and all kinds of knives, including steak knives and cutting knives. They also work for hunting knives and other items with blades. The material used for the sharpening edge is designed to increase the sharpness of the knife rather than dull it like other sharpening objects you may have used in the past.
Step 1 is to select an appropriate lapping plate or flattening stone, which is extremely coarse. Take a straight edge tool and lay it across your water stone to see if it truly needs flattening. Get down on eye level with the stone to see if a gap is visible, if so, then you will need to do a little bit of flattening. Sometimes the gap may be so slight that you will need to slip a piece of paper underneath the straight edge, which means if it can pass through, the stone needs flattened. This test will prove whether or not the stone genuinely needs to be flattened, so you do not waste your time.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.

Nothing can be more annoying than using a dull equipment in the absence of the best sharpening stones. It will make you exert more force where you actually need to use the sharpness of the blade. The ultimate result will be that you will end up having muscle pain which will take your annoyance to an infuriating level. To avoid this frustration, you should always keep your blade sharpened. That is where top quality sharpening stones can really help you out.
Inspect the Handle – First and foremost, you will want to inspect the handle. Will it be comfortable, when it is held within your hand? Is the handle perfectly attached to the sharpening steel? Before purchasing one of these items, it is essential to look at the handful very carefully and ensure that it is well made and will provide you with long-term comfortable use and satisfaction. If the sharpening steel detaches from the handle, your purchase will likely be for naught. Therefore, this element is vital!
This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set. 

Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
You can sharpen woodworking tools with the Smith’s 50008 8-Inch Diamond Tri-Hone as well. You get a 325 grit coarse diamond, a 750 grit fine diamond and natural Arkansas stones between 1,000 and 2,000 grit. The sharpening angle guide is something that first timers may need to handle the precision of the main unit. If you do not need this level of precision, then you can also use the included micro tool sharpening pad.

first time buying a sharping stone. i bought this because i wanted to sharpen kitchen knives. you have to practice to get good at it, use a knife you don't care about because you might mess it up. there is some conflicting instructions online on how to use, water or no water. read as much as you can about using stones and practice, practice , practice. look up videos on youtube and internet. i had fun using it, BUY IF YOU WANT TO LEARN here is some stuff i found, they all sound like professionals http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/knivescutlery/ht/whetstone.htm this is a video that says don't use water http://video.about.com/culinaryarts/Sharpen-Knives-With-a-Whetston.htm?rd=1 this is a youtube video that i watched that uses water. *informative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFIg9Cm-nJg
The WorkSharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener Ken Onion Edition gives you an adjustable tool with a guide that will help you produce incredibly precise edge bevels. The edges are bolstered through a flexible abrasive belt, and you also gain an adjustable motor speed in order to handle every sharpening task. You can hone or grind depending on your needs without a need to look back in the manual for every single adjustment.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.

You get a three stage system that you can adjust at any time to create the exact blade that you want.  The stage one creates fine microgrooves with diamond abrasives. Stage two delves even farther down into performance and creates even finer abrasives. Stage three incorporates an abrasive stropping disk system that is used to create a smooth edge that passes microscope quality tests.
There is very little doubt that Chef’s Choice is responsible for some of the great  knife sharpeners on the market. The Chef’s Choice 320 falls within this category, as well. It is somewhat more expensive than other kitchen knife sharpeners, but it offers a wealth of extra benefits and features. With a 2-stage sharpening system, you can rest assured knowing that this sharpener will get your blades sharp, without damaging them!
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
Easily Replaceable Parts – When selecting one of these products, you will want to ensure that it is going to provide you with many years of use. In order for this to happen, you need to choose one that has replaceable sharpening pads that can be removed and changed easily! If the process is too complicated, you likely won’t do it and the investment will become a waste. Therefore, it should be easy to change for your convenience.

Steel – In most cases, the sharpening steels are made from steel or ceramic. Each can effectively hone your blade, but they work differently. Quite frankly, the steel models are quickly being replaced by the much more convenient and quick ceramic. The steel is used in the same manner and looks identical, but it is a little harsher than the ceramic.
Throughout the years, knives have been used for an assortment of different purposes. Some have been able to use these blades to save their lives while others use them for more practical purposes, such as cutting through cardboard, at work and obviously in kitchens. In order for the knife to be completely effective, it is vital for the blade to be sharpened! Of course, this presents somewhat of a problem for newbies to the trade. With this in mind, you will want to read the comprehensive guide below, and pick up some pointers to find the best knife sharpener for you.
If you are looking for a sharpening product that will enhance your Shun knife collection, then the Shun DM0610 Classic 3-Piece Whetstone Sharpening System is the sharpener for you. You gain premium materials and a constrution aesthetic that is specific for professional chefs. The maintenance is simple – wipe the unit down with a cloth after every use.

This flattening stone has a rubber base for a firm grip while sharpening your pocket knife. Sharpening and smoothing your knives' edges are done on the Grit 1000 side. Use the Grit 400 side, your blades will be back to it's fine glory of it's original shape. Both sides of this premium whetstone are perfectly ideal for those short blades like the pocket knives. The benefits are in the precise sharpened blade you'll get from using this premium whetstone with patience. The details are the result of it. You may want to get some mesh gloves too. It's a good idea to use gloves while sharpening your pocket knives as many reviewers of it have recommended.

Again, burr formation is critical to success and if you are using a 1,000 grit stone on a dull knife, you may be there for a while but it will form. If you are grinding on one side for more than 3-4 minutes, flip the knife and work the opposite side, always feeling for a burr with your thumb on the opposite side to which you are working on. Remember, the fatigued metal is being forced down the blade towards the edge of the edge by your actions and the abrasive properties of the stone.


When it comes down to it, the sharpening systems are likely the most difficult, but most easy to use. Why this is the case? Each is unique and will have a different set of instructions. Therefore, a little bit of experimentation and practice will be required, in order to learn how to properly use your specific system. Of course, they’re also very easy to use. Why? Well, once you’ve learned how to use it, you will be able to use it repeatedly, without a second thought.
“This is the second knife sharpener I’ve purchased, and this one was a gift to my dad who was frequently using mine. I love this knife sharpener, as does he. We’ve both used it with great success on knives and blades — from pocket knives, scissors, kitchen knives, lawn-mower blades, to axes and hatchets, and I’m sure I’m forgetting things. Point is: We both use these knife sharpeners frequently, and they live up to the infomercial hype in my opinion.”

This three-stage sharpener is dedicated to sharpening and realigning the edges of straight and serrated knives efficiently. The key element of this system is its high-quality diamond abrasive. The sharpener is packed with advanced features like flexible stropping and sets up a 20-degree angle on European style and a 15-degree angle on Asian style beveled edged chef’s knives. This Chef’s Choice model is considered as the best electric knife sharpener by many knife sharpening enthusiasts. Read our detailed review to know more about this Chef’s Choice model.


The Smith’s 50008 8-Inch Diamond Tri-Hone is a very aggressive unit, but this is good if you know what you are doing. You get a great deal of flexibility with the different types of stones that come with the unit – two diamond plates alongside an Arkansas stone. You can sharpen your everyday, run of the mill blades on the Arkansas stone while reserving the other two stones for your premier blades. Do not use honing solutions that are oil based on this particular sharpener – make sure that you pay attention to the directions in the manual!

With all of the information above, you can see that each particular type of knife sharpener is sufficient for many different purposes. Some are better for kitchen knives, while others are betters for pocket knives. This presents somewhat of a complication that cannot be solved for you! Instead, it is absolutely vital for you to answer the question on your own to figure out the best knife sharpener for your needs.

The Norton Three Stone Sharpening System gives you three different shades of sharpening with silicon carbide and aluminum oxide stone. The angle guide that is included is relatively easy to use, increasing the amount of cost benefit you will get from this unit. You also get a rotating axis that helps to keep your stones held in place for better positioning. The base also contains a reservoir that allows for easy cleaning. The length of the stone is also an advantage – you can easily sharpen the entire blade at once.
Double-sided stones, with a medium grit on one side and finishing stone on the other, are popular among beginner sharpeners and convenient for home use. Lau recommends the Mizuyama two-sided whetstone ($73), with 1,000- and 6,000-grit sides, for beginners. “The stone itself is very high quality, really geared toward high-quality knives, so you can pretty much sharpen any metal with this one.”
Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
The more you use the sharpening stone; the edges of each particle within the stone tend to become slightly rounded over time. When you notice that it is taking much longer to hone blades and edges, it means you need to replace the stone with a new one. Sharpening stones come with decks that make it convenient to keep the tool in balance on the stone.

This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
Protip: As you use any synthetic sharpening stone, including the King Medium Grain Sharpening Stone, you will need to level out the middle of the stone with a stone fixer. The middle of the stone will naturally become concave over time. Fortunately, this does not happen as quickly with the King Medium Grain Sharpening Stone as with other products in its class.
The silicone base holds the stone inside the bamboo base which ensures that the stone is fixed in it while sharpening. Also, the knife sharpening angle guide will allow you to maintain an accurate angle so that you can safely apply consistent pressure on the blade. Some may face a bit of difficulty in maintaining the angle but you can overcome that issue by practicing and watching some youtube videos. If you are going for this stone, it will certainly do your job as you want it to be.
One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]

A: Experienced professionals know exactly how sharp they want their knives to be and have an instinctive feel for when they’re just right and when they’re even a tiny bit off. Most folks, however, need to have some sort of objective test they can use to determine if in fact their best knife has been properly sharpened. There are a few simple ones you can use:

By employing separate sharpening slots, the ProntoPro 4643 is capable of sharpening both older European-style knives (such as from Wüsthof and Henckels) and Japanese-style knives (such as from Mac—which makes our favorite chef’s knife—and Shun). The difference is in the angle of the bevel that forms the cutting edge: Traditional European knives have roughly 20-degree bevels, while Japanese knives have roughly 15-degree ones. If you own both types of knife, or if you do a lot of heavy work in the kitchen (like chopping up chicken carcasses), you’ll appreciate this feature, as a 20-degree bevel is best for tough jobs. Note, though, that Wüsthof and Henckels have stopped making 20-degree knives, having switched to 15-degree or 12-degree designs exclusively in 2011; the reason is that for all but the heaviest tasks, these more-acute bevels cut better and, with the ongoing improvements in steel alloys, hold their edges for just as long.


Prep your stone: To adequately lubricate the stone, rough and medium whetstones should be soaked in water for 20 to 30 minutes, or until air bubbles stop rising, before use. Finishing stones should not be soaked, as they are prone to cracking. Instead, sluice a fine-grit stone with water and use a nagura, or dressing stone, to create a slurry of silt for improved polishing. Once ready, place a sharpening base on a flat surface and fit the whetstone on top of it.
This automatic sharpening system is streamlined and incredibly powerful for its size. The spherical rod bearing is simple to adjust while maintaining the proximity between the rod and knife for best results. The grip allows a great deal of control, and it looks great as well. You also get three different types of stones: one for fine sharpening, one for all purpose, and one to restore coarse, extremely dull blades.
“My husband has been asking for a sharpening stone for a while, and I finally chose this three-sided system for him. I like that it comes with a stand so you can concentrate on sharpening your blade rather than trying to hold onto one of those tiny little stones. I really like that it has three different grits of stones in one system. It’s easy to set up and use. I am pretty new to sharpening my own knives, and I think this is great. My husband has been sharpening his own knives his entire life and he loves it too!”

I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.
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