Your whetstone will most likely be double-sided with a coarse and a fine grit. The grit is determined by the number of sand-like particles in the stone. The coarse grit will have fewer particles, whereas the finer grit will have more grains. Both sides are utilized to effectively sharpen a blade. The coarse grit, usually a deeper color; red or gray, will pre-sharpen the blade and remove any burrs or discrepancies in the blade. The finer grit is then used to hone and polish the blade, creating a finished edge.
Don't know. Not sure that I really care, as these stones definitely did the job that was asked of them, and did it with ease, even for a beginner whetstone user. I'll probably stick with them, at least until I get a lot more experience. Though, I do see a 10,000 or higher grit stone in my immediate future - more to play around with, than a feeling of genuine need.
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.
Ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without water or oil, which means they can be used almost anywhere and are ideal for chefs or cooks who have limited working spaces. They will give you a very sharp blade and as their surface is very hard they will maintain their flat surfaces over the long-term, but as they have a fine grit, they can break if you drop the stone.
I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.
Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
First time buyer, very pleased with the quality of the stone. They package it perfect for a chef, I never have to worry about my stone chipping in my bag. I use vg10 steel, and it's a perfect double sided stone for sharpening and polishing my blades. And something I didn't know when I bought it, if you register you purchase they might send you something to try. Very progressive company!
Ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without water or oil, which means they can be used almost anywhere and are ideal for chefs or cooks who have limited working spaces. They will give you a very sharp blade and as their surface is very hard they will maintain their flat surfaces over the long-term, but as they have a fine grit, they can break if you drop the stone.
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...

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✅ PREMIUM QUALITY : Our products have been inspected by a reputable third party inspection company. Each product has been checked,put under a durability and functionality test before shipped to you. NO COMPROMISE on quality! This simple-yet-unparalled award winning tool is used by everyone from stay at home moms to various professionals. Don’t forget to buy this as a PERFECT GIFT for your family & friends.


My father had visited and given us some tips on how to dampen the whetstones and sharpen the blade. — Cain Burdeau, Fox News, "An ancient way to cut grass, scything's also a state of mind," 19 June 2018 My father had visited and given us some tips on how to dampen the whetstones and sharpen the blade. — Washington Post, "Scything Zen: Ancient way to cut grass also a state of mind," 19 June 2018 Depending on the type of whetstone, apply a few drops of oil or water to the stone first. — Cindy Daniel, Sunset, "How to Maintan Your Garden Tools," 22 Jan. 2018 The gamekeeper sharpens the blade with a whetstone and shows him how it is done. — Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "Does Crafting Make People Happier?," 9 Apr. 2018 Whetstone was later given a chair in front of the box. — Dan Campana, Aurora Beacon-News, "Attorney: Jury 'tainted' that convicted Aurora man of murder," 12 May 2017 Willcox #USBP agents arrest 1, seize hearse with over 67lbs. of marijuana in smuggling effort near Whetstone # — Lisa Gutierrez, kansascity.com, "Grim reefer: 67 pounds of pot found hidden in casket, border patrol says," 4 May 2017 Willcox #USBP agents arrest 1, seize hearse with over 67lbs. of marijuana in smuggling effort near Whetstone # — Sammy Nickalls, Esquire, "Someone Tried to Smuggle 67 Pounds of Weed In a Coffin," 1 May 2017
Your whetstone will most likely be double-sided with a coarse and a fine grit. The grit is determined by the number of sand-like particles in the stone. The coarse grit will have fewer particles, whereas the finer grit will have more grains. Both sides are utilized to effectively sharpen a blade. The coarse grit, usually a deeper color; red or gray, will pre-sharpen the blade and remove any burrs or discrepancies in the blade. The finer grit is then used to hone and polish the blade, creating a finished edge.
To sharpen a knife using a whetstone, submerge the stone in water for approximately ten minutes. When the stone absorbs the proper amount of water you will no longer see air bubbles floating to the top of the water. Place the whetstone on a flat, stable, slip-resistant surface coarse side facing up. Move the blade back and forth across the stone several times, tip to heel, at the correct angle for your knife. While sharpening, it is important to continuously pour water on the whetstone. Small particles release from the whetstone and form an abrasive substance when in contact with water. Repeat on the other side of the blade. Once this is complete, flip the stone over to the fine side and repeat the process. The fine side will take off any leftover steel. Finally, rinse the knives off in hot water.
A good whetstone and a little practice will keep all of your knives sharp and in perfect condition. The beauty is that it doesn’t take much effort to learn, just a good bit of practice to get the angle right and keep a consistent angle while you’re sharpening. Whetstones are available in department stores or online, and while they range in price based on the fineness of the grit, this thread at eGullet can help you pick a good grit to start with.
Turn around time is typically between 3 and 7 days. We offer same-day rush for an extra 50% fee. If you are in the industry and work with your knives please call the shop at 415 355 0773, we are able accommodate industry schedules, please be prepared to prove you use your knives or tools as part of your trade. Sharpening can be dropped off at the store on the corner of Guerrero and 18th, or mailed-in.
You may be utilized that one additionally dried out without having water or even essential oil making all of them simple to use whenever within the area. It may be cleaned out along with cleaning soap along with a typical kitchen area container scrubber. The actual quality grits depart the refined, really the razor-sharp advantage. However usually that one obtainable quality grids just.
Works well. Just got it today, sharpened two pocket knives, one a 8Cr13MoV Chinese steel, the other s30v American steel The stone made short work of both steels (which were pretty sharp already). But notably was able to make the s30v hair shaving sharp easily, something I've had trouble with. Inexpensive and useful, I love this stone. It's not the Ninja sharp 8000+ grits that you can find, but for pocket knives and EDC, it's perfect and inexpensive. Get One!!!!!!!!!!!!

We’ve shown you how to keep knives sharp before, and even discussed why water stones are best, but this crash course is quick, fast, and gets to the point. In most cases the most the average person at home can do is either hone their blade with a honing steel, which straightens and lines up the blade’s edge, but it doesn’t sharpen it. Alternatively you could run it through a handheld or electronic sharpener, but depending on the model you use it can do more harm than good.
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 
Highest Quality Engineering and Materials Each of our superior Whetstones are made from the highest quality bonded abrasive compound of aluminium oxide or ‘ Corundum’. Unlike Natural Whetstones, our bonded abrasives provide a faster cutting action and are considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. Double-sided with coarse grit on one side and fine grit on the other, just the one stone satisfies the fundamental requirements for superior knife sharpening.

After several uses the Kamikoto is proving itself to be better than expected. As a professional I use different knives all the time and in fact have several thousand dollars worth of very fine blades of various manufacture. As it stands right now, if I could pick only one knife from all of them, I would take the Kamikoto. Fish, vegetables, raw meat, cooked meat, it handles them all very well and is a pleasure to use because of excellent balance and weight. And the edge… magnificent. Care and careful sharpening will be important, but then it always is with the finest of things. I would unhesitatingly recommend this product to people who appreciate the best. This is not a knife for fools or clumsy people. Buy, use, enjoy. And to the people at Kamikoto; “Thank You for making such a beautiful thing!”
✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.

This is a good size stone and has the two different grits needed for knife sharpening. No instructions were included, but there are many websites with written and video instructions, so this is not an issue for most people. A fair amount of dust is generated during the sharpening process, so protect the work surface and wash the knife after sharpening is completed.


You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
After several uses the Kamikoto is proving itself to be better than expected. As a professional I use different knives all the time and in fact have several thousand dollars worth of very fine blades of various manufacture. As it stands right now, if I could pick only one knife from all of them, I would take the Kamikoto. Fish, vegetables, raw meat, cooked meat, it handles them all very well and is a pleasure to use because of excellent balance and weight. And the edge… magnificent. Care and careful sharpening will be important, but then it always is with the finest of things. I would unhesitatingly recommend this product to people who appreciate the best. This is not a knife for fools or clumsy people. Buy, use, enjoy. And to the people at Kamikoto; “Thank You for making such a beautiful thing!”
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