A particularly odd use for the whetstone was as a tool for punishment. There are accounts of people who were found guilty of lying and were sentenced to have their head and hands stuck in a pillory with a whetstone around their neck. The origin of this practice is unknown. Such was the case for William Blackeney, who was discovered to be lying about being a pilgrim, a crime because he was coercing people into giving him gifts and other benefits. After being presented to the city officials, he was sentenced to be publicly shamed via the pillory and was forced to wear a whetstone around his neck for having deceived people for several years. Another case of this type was seen in William Hughlot’s punishment for assaulting several people, one of whom was an alderman. Upon his arrest, he proclaimed that the blame should be on the mayor and he proceeded to insult the court. Instead of the traditional punishment of cutting off the hand of a man who assaulted an alderman, he was pardoned and was given the lesser punishment of imprisonment along with being locked in the pillory with a whetstone around his neck. This use of the whetstone is curious, but when considering the duration of an individual’s punishment via the pillory, probably about an hour or more a day, it would seem that this could be an irritating and shameful punishment.
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.

Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.


Now move the blade – with a little pressure – in regular movements up and down along the sharpening stone. Always maintain the angle between the blade and stone. You will notice a burr become visible after five or so movements. Mentally divide the blade into three sections if the knife has a large blade. Always start with the tip and work back towards the bolster.
Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
I'm using this for a set of kitchen knives. As far as their quality goes, they are a name brand, but middle tier at best. The kind you can pick up at a mall kitchen store. They were all dull and in need of sharpening. After using these stones, my knives were all insanely sharp. They were noticably sharper than when I first bought them. I'm not experienced with sharpening stones, so I can't say how these compare with others, but for my needs as a non-professional, this set is perfect. Outperforms my needs.
I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.
You need to adjust your fingers as you move the knife back and forth. Because sharpening takes place under your fingers, start with them at the tip and, as you pull the knife back toward you, release pressure completely and pause. Then, shift your fingers just a little down the blade toward the heel. This finger dance is critical and takes time getting used to.
I'm certainly not the most experienced knife sharpener our there, but these stones are effective. I've been able to sharpen all my kitchen knives to excellent edges with some practice. The packaging is great, and the manufacturing quality is exceptional. The only issue I've run into is that the silicon base doesn't stick very well to my quartz countertop, and has a tendency to slide a little while I use it, but that hasn't stopped me from using the product well, I just have to reposition the stone every few minutes.

I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.


Know your stones: Whetstones are made with a range of materials, from ceramics to synthetics, or a cement-like conglomerate of finely ground stone. All whetstones are categorized according to grit, or coarseness. Rough stones have a lower grit count and are the first step in sharpening a particularly dull or chipped blade. Medium whetstones hover in the 800- to 2,000-grit range and are most often the first step in sharpening a knife. Whetstones with a grit count of 3,000 or above are referred to as finishing stones, and are used for refining and polishing.


The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).
You need to adjust your fingers as you move the knife back and forth. Because sharpening takes place under your fingers, start with them at the tip and, as you pull the knife back toward you, release pressure completely and pause. Then, shift your fingers just a little down the blade toward the heel. This finger dance is critical and takes time getting used to.

Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
Before we start, I want to make clear that there are dozens of different ways to sharpen a knife. Everyone has a way they think is best, and men have all sorts  of techniques and tools that they feel are essential in getting a sharp blade. In the end, much of it comes down to personal preference. I’m going to show you the way I learned how to sharpen a pocket knife. It’s very basic, good for beginners, and best of all, it works. If you have an alternative method that you prefer, great. Share it with us in the comments. I’d love to hear your tips.
The Mikarto sleek, elegant, and multi-use chef sharpening stone is a great gift option that anybody would love to receive. Enjoyed by professionals and people who just love to cook, this product is fantastic for those who have high-quality knives and want to ensure they stay cooking-ready. Buy for a housewarming party, a wedding, or a birthday present. This sharpening kit is perfect for any occasion and for anybody that knows how important a sharp knife is.
Whichever method you choose, be it a waterstone (also known as a whetstone), or a pull-through (either V-shaped or ceramic wheels) it's important to regularly hone your knife with a honing steel, which we'll also cover below. You'll be pleased to hear that you won't have to reach for the stones too regularly – once every two or three months should suffice. 
3-STAGE KNIFE SHARPENER: Sharpen dull knife quickly with the incredible 3-stage knife sharpening system. The 2nd diamond slot provides general sharpening before the 1st tungsten slot repairs and straightens damaged blades, the 3rd ceramic slot fine tunes for a clean polish. QUICKLY BRING BACK SHARP BLADE : Why spend more money buying a new knife? With this kitchen knife sharpener, you can recycle your old, dull knife and sharpen them back to life. HIGH QUALITY:This best knife sharpener made of ceramic, diamond, tungsten steel and high quality ABS plastic. It's very safe, stable, durable. EASY TO USE: Simply place your dull knife in the sharpening slot and gently pull the knife through a few times for fast, effective sharpening.

1. Start off with the rough grit. If you have a particularly dull blade, start off with the rough grit side of your sharpening stone. How do you tell which side is the rough grit? Sometimes you can tell by sight. If you can’t do that, do a thumbnail test. Scratch the surface with your thumbnail and whichever side feels rougher, that’s the side you want to start off with. Also, rough grits tend to be more porous than finer grits. So if you put water on one side and the stone really drinks it up, chances are it’s the rough grit.
The emergence of high quality synthetic stones has begun to replace their natural stone counterparts. This is in part because of the limited resources of natural stones in the current market. The synthetic models boast a consistent particle size and high quality to rival the natural stone. The advantage of natural stones are their natural beauty and their rarity, which make them collectors items and they are usually handed down from one generation to the next.
This is the best sharpening stone of its kind for the money. It's conventional wisdom that proper sharpening requires starting from a coarse grit abrasive to remove blunted or mechanically fatigued metal before sharpening and polishing with progressively finer grits, however, in my experience it is generally less time consuming and more effective to use this stone for general purpose sharpening unless abnormally great care is needed. This stone is aggressive enough to produce noticeable results quickly yet it is fine enough to still be useful in refining knife edges to push cutting performance levels and polishing a knife's bevels to mirror like reflectivity (albeit deeper scratches in the metal will be visible unless you have successfully gone through the more traditional low to high progression of grit levels). This can be the only sharpening device for knives you will need unless you are in the business of making knives or sharpening large numbers of knives on other people's behalf.
A DUAL FUNCTIONING BLOCK This carefully designed tool is actually two stones in one. When deciding on the perfect wetstone knife sharpener, you want a rock that has a lower-numbered grit for sharpening and a higher-numbered grit for polishing. One side of our stone is #1000 and is designed to sharpen dull blades with accuracy and precision. The other side is #6000 and provides a deluxe polishing effect. Our aluminum sharpening stone ensures optimal performance of your knives.
Next we sharpen the opposite side of the blade. Just as you did before, sharpen the knife keeping an angle of 10' to 15'. Push the point you want to sharpen with your first, second and third fingers. While keeping the angle and pushing the point with your fingers, stroke the blade until it reaches the other edge of the whetstone. Then pull the blade back until it reaches the edge of the whetstone. This back and forth is counted as one stroke. Repeat it for about five strokes until you can see or feel some small burrs (edge curvatures).. Then move the position of your fingers to where you have not sharpened yet, and repeat this five strokes of sharpening processed from the tip to the base of the blade. When your whetstone becomes dry, occational watering during  sharpening process will also help and improve smooth sharpening.
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