We have been in the sharpening business since we opened our flagship location in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the Fall of 2012. Our standard wet-sharpening service provides a high quality edge using water cooled sharpening equipment. Our whetstone hand sharpening service was introduced during the Spring of 2015. See the details of each service below to determine the ideal option for your knives.


However, because the Belgian Blue stone generally occurs in relatively wide columns with much thinner layers of Vielsalm Coticule on either side adjacent to the slate, the Belgian Blue stone is more plentiful that Coticule and thus, it’s somewhat less expensive. But, it’s also somewhat softer than Coticule and is not divided into different grades as Coticule is. Furthermore, because it is a softer stone than Coticule, it is sold without a substrate layer.
A sharpening stone is a stone that has got a coarse side and usually a finer side, and that is going to take and re-shape your edge and get it back down thin enough in order to sharpen it. You are basically taking something that is blunt and thinning it back down. You have to remove all of this extra metal and get it back down to where it is thin enough to cut. Very simply, all a knife is is a very thin piece of steel to split whatever you are cutting. If the knife is obviously thicker, it is like trying to cut something with a chisel; it is not going to happen.

If in doubt or just learning, a safe bet is a set of quality synthetic stones. They’re the easiest to use, require the least maintenance and are the most forgiving. If you’re just starting out we highly recommend the Naniwa Sharpening Stones. They’re excellent quality, reliable, durable and no soaking time is required. For advanced users we recommend the Naniwa Pro sharpening stones or Kaiden Ceramics.
Cross-contamination of food can lead to serious health risks like food poisoning or unintended exposure to food allergens . If your kitchen staff members know how to prevent cross-contamination by correctly storing and preparing food, you can save the time and money that would be wasted on improperly handled food. By making the effort to separate your foods while storing and preparing them, sanitizing your kitchen surfaces and equipment, and practicing proper personal hygiene, you can create a safe and sanitary kitchen environment that is better for your customers, your employees, and your business. What is Cross-Contamination? Cross-contamination occurs when disease-causing microorganisms, like bacteria and viruses, are transferred from on
This is our most popular knife sharpening service and the option selected for most mid to high end knife brands including Wusthof, Zwilling J.A Henckels, Global, Shun, Messermeister, Chicago Cutlery, Sabatier, Friedr. Dick, Dexter, Miyabi, Berti and many more. Our wet-sharpening service uses water cooled equipment to prevent the steel from overheating; a common problem with knife sharpening. This process is appropriate for all straight edge kitchen knives.

In terms of feedback, in the eyes, and in the hands of many sharpeners, the feedback on this particular brand of stones is not to their liking and often it is enough to stop them from using them. These are thinner than other stones as well so you may get the impression that you are not getting your moneys worth. They are very hard stones, there is no soft, creamy sensation as you sharpen, there is not much feedback at all in fact.


I'm not sure what the purpose of the extra white stone is - it says it is to flatten, but IMHO it is not a great idea to flatten the stones with something that small. I have a separate diamond lapping plate with a large surface area that I use to flatten the stones. It might be useful for sharpening awkward edges, like scissors and secateurs, though!
Prep your stone: To adequately lubricate the stone, rough and medium whetstones should be soaked in water for 20 to 30 minutes, or until air bubbles stop rising, before use. Finishing stones should not be soaked, as they are prone to cracking. Instead, sluice a fine-grit stone with water and use a nagura, or dressing stone, to create a slurry of silt for improved polishing. Once ready, place a sharpening base on a flat surface and fit the whetstone on top of it.

These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
Naniwa also makes the Naniwa Traditional line of stones, these are less expensive than the Professional lineup and I believe were created to compete in terms of cost with some other brands such as King that are less expensive, more attractive to some who are just starting and may not want to invest a lot of money. I have tried the Naniwa Traditional 220, 1,000 and 2,000 grit stones and I thoroughly enjoyed them, so if you are considering a less expensive brand to get started, these are also good. I do not like them as much as the Professional line but I do like them, they work, they make the knives sharp.
Historically, there are three broad grades of Japanese sharpening stones: the ara-to, or "rough stone", the naka-to or "middle/medium stone" and the shiage-to or "finishing stone". There is a fourth type of stone, the nagura, which is not used directly. Rather, it is used to form a cutting slurry on the shiage-to, which is often too hard to create the necessary slurry. Converting these names to absolute grit size is difficult as the classes are broad and natural stones have no inherent "grit number". As an indication, ara-to is probably (using a non-Japanese system of grading grit size) 500–1000 grit. The naka-to is probably 3000–5000 grit and the shiage-to is likely 7000–10000 grit. Current synthetic grit values range from extremely coarse, such as 120 grit, through extremely fine, such as 30,000 grit (less than half a micrometer abrasive particle size).[citation needed]

Before starting the sharpening process, you should put some honing solution to the surface. Water can also be used as a substitute but you don’t need to use a lot of them as a small amount would be enough for it. The absent of lubricant and water will cause a damage to your stone. The angle guide will help you to keep the blade at a perfect angle so that you can get the best output.

The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.
Cutlery is essential to the operation of every commercial kitchen, so it is important to know the best techniques for kitchen knife handling and safety. Proper knife training can help minimize the risk of personal injury and keep your kitchen running smoothly. If you are just beginning to learn or simply need to brush up on your approach, keep reading for some helpful knife safety tips. 1. A Sharp Knife Is a Safer Knife When you use a dull knife to cut, you need to apply more force. As a result, the knife is more likely to slip and increases the risk of injury. Keeping your knives sharpened is one of the easiest ways to keep them safe. Simply use a sharpening stone or knife sharpener to maintain the original precision of the blade. If your
When I contact the company customer support, they told me is because the way I sharpen my knives are not correct, I put too much pressure on it, so I asked them if that's true, since I am using the same method to sharpen my knives, why it won't happened to the other side (#8000) and the other stone (400/1000)? They don't even give me any answer to that question at all.

Ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without water or oil, which means they can be used almost anywhere and are ideal for chefs or cooks who have limited working spaces. They will give you a very sharp blade and as their surface is very hard they will maintain their flat surfaces over the long-term, but as they have a fine grit, they can break if you drop the stone.
Japanese water stones are the most famous. These are usually made from sedimentary rock and for the most part are fairly fragile. They are intended to only use be used with water as oil will destroy them. Waterstones wear out more quickly than other types but they are very easy to flatten when required. The ever common oil stone Oil stones are much like the Japanese waterstones but are more durable. With these you can use either oil or water. Most famous type of these stones are the Arkansas oilstones harvested from the Washita mountains.
Selecting the proper coarseness for your sharpening stone is an important first step in sharpening your knife. Not every knife needs to start at the coarsest stone you have, on the other hand a very dull knife can not be sharpened on only your finest stone. Starting with the proper coarseness will ensure that you achieve the edge you need quickly. If your knife is very dull or has a nicked blade, start with your coarsest stone. The coarse stone removes material quickly so a poor edge can be refined quickly. However, the coarse stone must be followed up with your finer stone to refine the edge. If your knife is only slightly dull and just needs a quick touch up, starting at a medium or fine stone can save you time. Starting on a fine stone requires fewer steps but must only be used on an edge requiring little work.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
Once sufficiently wet, it's time to position the stone on something solid, so it doesn't move about during sharpening. Many come with holders, but you can just place it on a slightly damp tea towel on the table. The stone should be roughly perpendicular to your body, though Warner told me it is sometimes easier to angle it ever so slightly to the right (if you're right handed). 
✅ SAFE & EASY TO USE: We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. Using our whetstone is extremely Easy & Economical. You don’t need any expensive sharpening/honing oil as its designed to work best with water. And it can be easily cleaned with water.
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Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.
The video above, from the How To You YouTube channel, explains everything you need to sharpen with a whetstone at home, and the best methods for doing so. Obviously, you’ll need a whetstone (as well as a few other things), and you’ll want to work near your sink or a bucket so you have easy access to water. Fill a container with water, then soak the whetstone in it until it stops bubbling. Inspect your blades for any trouble spots, and get to sharpening using the methods and motions described in the video; making sure to check your progress as you go. We’ve talked about sharpening knives with whetstones before, but this guide is a bit more thorough and the old video has since been removed.
This is one of the best sharpening stones available on the market. It boasts both medium and fine grit to ensure that you sharpen your kitchen knife to the required sharpness. And yes, it also boasts a superior wear-resistant construction which is made of aluminum oxide. Given it versatile construction, this sharpening stone can be used to sharpen all types of kitchen cutting tools including scissors and knives.

We're not completely sure but we think we now have the largest selection of sharpening stones on the face of the earth. If you're interested in something and don't see it here please contact us and we'll try to get it. Most of the stones you see here are Japanese water stones, both synthetic and naturals. There is also a wide selection of stone holders, flatteners, and other items that will help you get a razor sharp edge on all your sharp tools and knives.
I bought this wonderful knife on faith. I was told in March when it would ship. I received emails alerting me that my knife would be arriving as promised. It came early, thanks! Tthe quality and feel of the knife exceeded my wildest dreams. I lived in Tsubami ahi where knives are hand forged. This has a place amongst the best. I have it on display for now as I view it as a supreme work of art.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.

Stone is awesome, stand and rubber holder are awesome. Sharpened my Benchmade griptilian with a 154CM (58-61HRC) stainless steel blade to easily shaving hair in about 10 minutes or less, on the 4000 side. Can probably get it sharper, too. Completely worth the money, and very easy to use after a few minutes of reading - don't waste any money on pre-built sharpeners - they suck.
Even sharpening stones have a technique to them, and you need to master the technique first. Most people may find that they are sharpening wrong and that’s why it’s important to understand the angles. Once you learn how to use the sharpening stone efficiently, then it becomes very easy to sharpen blades. It is also critical that exact dipping time is observed to avoid breakage.

I bought these knives based on the reviews on the web. As you can all see, the reviews are very positive. So, I purchased these with VERY high expectations. I was reluctant based on how expensive these knives are. After using them now for several months I am blow away by the quality of these. It has changed my whole view of how important great knives make to my meal preparation. I can say without reservation that these knives are a bargain. These are a great investment in yourself and your family. Man, are these sharp! Recommend these without reservation.
You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
Welcome to the Top 5 Best Sharpening Stone of 2018. Dull equipment is annoying, slow and infuriating. Any good chef knows the importance of a sharp knife and any woodworker knows that all tools should be sharp. Many people suffer from pain in their arms because instead of using sharp tools, they end up using their strength and force to cut through. A solution is however here, a sharpening stone. In this guide, all the factors to consider when looking for a sharpening stone are here.
This is exactly what we've needed! We have a pull-through version of a knife sharpener, but it's more for fine tuning. Our kitchen knives have seen many years of love, though, and were in desperate need of some proper attention. The stone worked magic on them. I'm very impressed with how significant the difference is. Frankly, I'm a little irritated with myself for now doing more research when I bought that pull-through one, because this stone is fantastic.
I've been using these stones for the past day, and they work great. Once you get the technique down that works for you, you can sharpen any knife to the point it can cut through news paper. Tip: make sure you count the amount of times you pass through the stone on one side and do that same amount on the other side. What I usually do is if I know the knife is very dull or chipped, I do 100 passes on each side using the 400 grit. I test the blade on thick paper and if it cuts through I test it on news paper. If it doesn't cut through the news paper I do another 50 passes on each side. Repeat this until the blade can cut through newspaper. After, on the 1000,3000, and then the 8000 grit stone I do 50 passes on each side. This should make the blade very smoothe cutting and polish it. I plan on getting a strop or piece of leather to further polish the blade. The only thing I don't like about this is that this package is that it does not come with a dressing stone so you can re flatten/level the stone after using them.
Japanese water stones – both natural and synthetic – are known for their superior sharpening performance, not only for Japanese tools, but also on their Western equivalents. The loosely bonded abrasive grit is washed out very quickly, as it blunts during the sharpening process; this exposes new, sharp, particles that can get to work on the blade. Water stones are lubricated only with water! Never use oil!
The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.
This pocket-size Lansky dual grit has a coarse 120 grit side and a medium 280 grit side. The unique tool is ideal for sharpening a wide variety of blades. The Puck’s contoured shape is very much grip-able and provides enough safety while you do your tool sharpening. Its coarse side provides quick cutting and shaping, and the medium side will help to get the final finishing of the edge.
When attempting to choose a whetstone for sharpening your favorite knife, the number of choices can be mind boggling. In fact, sharpening stones are divided into four distinct categories consisting of natural whetstones and manufactured whetstones which, in turn, are divided into two other categories consisting of oil stones and water stones. Then, there are numerous different varieties of natural whetstones consisting of several different materials that are quarried from different places around the world as well as several different types of man-made whetstones!
We recommend that customers invest in Kamikoto’s Toishi Sharpening Whetstone to keep handcrafted knives sharp and ready to cut. The Toishi Sharpening Whetstone sits on a beautiful wooden bamboo stand and features two sides – one with a coarse grit to grind away any roughness, and the other with a fine grit that sharpens and polishes the edge. The finer the grit, the finer the edge on your knife. The sturdy wooden stand holds the whetstone safely in place so you can concentrate on gaining the sharpest edge possible.
Medium Grit Stones: The number range here is from 1000 to 3000, with the latter being the basic, go-to sharpening stone. If your knives have lost their edge and need a good sharpen, then this is the grit you should start with. Don’t use it too often or the knife wears down rapidly. If you like to sharpen regularly, then the 2000 and 3000 grit are the ideal choice as they are less coarse, but please remember they are designed for sharpening and not maintaining the edge.
They are the most common types of sharpening stones available. Experts consider them as one of the best stones to choose from. The most highlighting feature of this type of stone is that they are available in different grit levels which is super useful for the users. Before using them you have to dip them in the water or soak them in it for about five to fifteen minutes. Which is also the reason for what they become very brittle due to constant soaking and drying.
Diamond sharpening stones are becoming really popular because of their ability to cut fast. We tend not to recommend diamond sharpening stones/plates because a lot of damage can be done very quickly. Also diamonds are pretty sharp and at arato level they leave deep scratches in the blade that need to be polished out quite aggressively. Diamond stones can be used with and without lubricant.

The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.

This tool can be used for quick sharpening while maintaining the safety of the user. Very easy to use as it is a basic design sharpener. For the long blade, you can use a wider wooden base to keep the tool in a fix position. This stone is perfect for your daily maintenance by removing very little material away from your blade in a very short time. Before starting to use, first soak the stone for five minutes in the water and then place it on a firm platform.
“There’s no real end to learning how to sharpen knives because there’s always something more to improve on,” explains Vincent Lau, a sharpener at Korin, an early importer of Japanese knives to the U.S., who has trained under company founder Chiharu Sugai for eight years. That shouldn’t be a deterrent, however. Basic whetstone sharpening is simply a matter of finding the proper angle.
Silicone Carbide whetstones on the other hand, are the fastest cutting of the three types of oil stones and the stones made by Norton are called Crystolon Stones. Also they too are graded as either fine, medium, or coarse stones depending on their grit. But, although these stones will not produce an edge as fine as Arkansas Oil Stones or India Oil Stones, their fast cutting ability makes them ideal for sharpening tools as well as for cutting the initial edge bevel on extremely dull knives or repairing the edge on damaged blades. Last, because they sharpen so quickly, it a common practice to start with a coarse Crystolon Oil Stone and then progress to either a medium or fine India Oil Stone and then to finish with an Arkansas Oil Stone.
✅ RAZOR SHARP KNIVES: Are you tired & frustrated with your dull knives? Then don't look any further, Our Easy to Use Premium Quality Proprietary Japanese Sharpening Stone Grit 3000/8000 combination is designed to make your knives razor sharp & provide extra fine finish/polish on your blades. So you can Cut, Slice & Dice through your Food with Ease.
We offer a series of oilstone packages that combine India and Arkansas stones and are very reasonably priced. At 8" long by 2" wide these stones are not as wide as some other types, but still wide enough for many edges and are plenty wide for knife sharpeners. Available in four price levels, these kits are a great opportunity for the beginning sharpener on a budget.
When the block is intended for installation on a bench it is called a bench stone. Small, portable stones (commonly made of bonded abrasive) are called pocket stones. Being smaller, they are more portable than bench stones but present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and pressure when drawing the stone along larger blades. However, they still can form a good edge. Frequently, fine grained pocket stones are used for honing, especially "in the field". Despite being a homophone with wet in most dialects of modern English, whetstones do not need to be lubricated with oil or water, although it is very common to do so. Lubrication aids the cutting action and carries swarf away.
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