Unlike my choice for Best Manual Sharpener, the Chef’s Choice 15 was a slam dunk for the category of Best Electric Sharpener. Not only does it come fully loaded with almost everything you could think of, it also received extremely positive consumer reviews. As usual, it will take a little more space to tell you about something as awesome as this knife sharpener.
This 600/1,000 grit is my second Unimi knife sharpener, the first is 2,000/6,000 grit and I love them both. Both stones together produce very sharp and well polished knives that reduce the cutting effort and save time in the kitchen. I particularly appreciate that the manufacture printed the grit number on the side of each stone - that helps use the different grits in the proper sequence from the coarser to the finer. The stone comes with a non-slip silicone/rubber base which is very handy.

The edge the Trizor XV made was the best in our tests. In contrast to the “toothy” edge that the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 creates, the Trizor XV polishes an edge to a razorlike finish—meaning the knife is perfectly capable of straight-up-and-down chop-cutting of items like onions and garlic, as well as traditional push- and pull-cutting. Perhaps the highest compliment we can give the Trizor XV is that, when the test was done, we resharpened the knives that we had used with the rejected competition models on the Trizor XV.
You could bring your knives to a local knife sharpener, but why not do it yourself? Sharpening your knives is very easy when you use the tools from Knivesandtools. In addition, sharpening your knives is great fun because you will experience step by step what happens to your knife while you sharpen it. As such you will truly start to appreciate your razor-sharp knives. Taking care of your own knives is fun, useful and, above all, a piece of cake!
I don’t think we should even wonder what is better for sharpening knives. The Edge Pro or freehand sharpening, both are effective. It just depends on what method not only gives you sharp knives but makes you feel good about yourself when you are done. There are some people who are completely against using any type of Jig and I get that. I did not purchase the Edge Pro because I couldn’t sharpen knives without it, I got it because I am obsessed with knife sharpening and I believed this to be a quality product that sharpened knives well, I have never regretted the purchase.
Storage Allotment – How much space are you willing to allot to your knife sharpener? Although this won’t be such a big deal for some individuals, it will be a major selling point for others. By choosing a smaller product, such as the Chef’s Choice Pronto or the King Sharpening Stone, you will be able to toss your sharpener in a drawer and forget about it, until you need it again. On the other hand, a bigger product, such as an electric or entire sharpening system, will require increased space. Be sure to choose an option that fits your preferences.
The product has a 2-stage sharpening system, which ensures that all of your blades will be sharpened perfectly. Take note that this specific sharpener does not offer angles! It is only useable with straight edges! Still, the product is super easy to use, inexpensive and will sharpen your blades perfectly. With that, the product is definitely one of the best knife sharpeners for kitchen knives!

Feedback is something that is very important to most sharpeners, i.e. how the stone feels when you are using it. Does it feel smooth, creamy and silky or does it feel hard and scratchy. While feedback, pleasant or unpleasant may be a purchase deterring factor it really doesn’t have any effect on level of sharpness that the stone can deliver. Unless of course the feedback is so distracting that it hinders the sharpeners focus and enjoyment and as a result, the sharpener doesn’t like what he/she is doing so that ultimately it does have the potential to negatively impact the results.
Manual knife sharpeners are the most compact and affordable type. In fact, we found excellent reviews for one small manual sharpener that costs just $10 on average. Fancier manual models offer users more control over the sharpening process but also require more skill to use. Most manual sharpeners have no moving parts at all; you do the work by drawing the blade repeatedly across the sharpener's abrasive surface which may be a stone or a rod, or even a slotted system that you just pull the knife through.
There are no lengthy explanations needed to describe the Lansky 8” Ceramic Sharp Stick sharpener. It’s an old-fashioned device comprised of a hardwood handle and ceramic sharpening rod. That’s it. Sure it’s not going to create an absolutely picture perfect edge down to the last micron but it will keep your knives really sharp and do so for next to nothing.
The Idahone stood out on a couple of fine details, too: Its ergonomic maple wood handle was more comfortable than the synthetic handles on the rest of the competitors, and its hanging ring is amply sized and sturdily made of steel. The other ceramic rods we tested had smaller hanging rings, plastic rings, or no hanging ring at all. Hanging a ceramic rod is a good idea, because the material is somewhat brittle and can chip or break if it gets jostled around in a drawer or utensil holder.
It is believed that Vikings suspended these knife sharpening tools from their belt. However, it is not exactly clear, even to scholars, how the Vikings wore these pendants. We laced ours with a versatile, adjustable high-quality leather cord and packed it in a USA-made muslin pouch so you get to choose how to wear it or carry it. Wear it around the neck for the most Ragnariest looking necklace you’ve ever seen, cinch it all the way down so that it can be hitched to your belt or clipped onto your pack, or simply pocket it while still contained in the hand-stamped muslin pouch.
Typically, you will first need to clamp the blade into place and tighten a knob, in order to secure it to the system. After this, you’ll need to work to adjust the angle. This is generally controlled by a little knob. Once you’ve selected the angle, you will be able to lock it into place to ensure that the angle is maintained throughout the sharpening process for a much more consistent edge.
The design of the knife sharpener is unique. It sticks to any flat surface due to the suction pad. This gives the user excellent control, safety, and confidence when using the knife sharpener. It can work on even serrated knives. The user needs just to slide your knife drawing it through one direction. It can be easily stored in a drawer making storage very easy.
Most users say that the Spyderco Sharpmaker is easy to use, even if its instruction manual can be a little confusing at first. But if you're not comfortable with its relatively open mechanics, consider our best-reviewed knife sharpening kit, the Lansky Professional Sharpening System (Est. $55). This system comes with a clamp that secures the knife blade, four grits of hones from coarse/grinding to ultra-fine, and a triangle-shaped hone for sharpening serrated blades. You attach a guide rod to each hone, then slide the guide rod into a hole on the clamp. Which hole you choose sets the angle for the sharpening: 17, 20, 25 or 30 degrees. Once the guide rod is in place, you swing the hone repeatedly across the edge of the blade at the pre-set angle; anywhere from six to 20 passes with each hone will do the job.

The Whetstone 2-Sided Sharpening Stone is made from professional grade corundum and will sharpen everything from a razor blade to a cleaver and even a machete, should you happen to have a machete lying about that needs sharpening. This is the simplest type of sharpener it’s true but the company have obviously put a great deal of thought into the product.
Siliciclastic stone is a clastic, noncarbonate, sedimentary stone that is almost exclusively silica-bearing and exists as either a form of quartz or, another silicate mineral. In addition, hardened clay is also a sedimentary stone but, it is formed from organic materials such as plant and animal matter and thus, it is much softer than Siliciclastic However, when silicon sediment is suspended in a clay matrix and then naturally hardened over thousands of years, it forms an excellent whetstone material; although, it is somewhat softer than Novaculite. Thus, because the geology of Japan once held large deposits of this type of stone it has been used for hundreds of years for sharpening tools, knives, and swords. However, unlike Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule, both natural and synthetic Japanese whetstones use water for lubrication and thus, they are commonly known as “Japanese Water Stones” because this type of stone is very porous. Thus, natural Japanese Water Stones must be soaked in water for up to twenty-four hours prior to use whereas, synthetic Japanese Water Stones can be soaked for only a few moments.
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.
Sharp knives make the culinary world go round but finding the best knife sharpener isn’t as simple as walking into the store (do people still walk into stores?) and grabbing the first sharpener that presents itself. There are different types of electric sharpeners, some that are straightforward and some whose sharpening process involves as many as 3 or 4 stages. If you’re looking to keep things simple by using a sharpening stone well, there are 3 different types of them as well – oil, water and diamond – and they each have their pros and cons. So it can be confusing.
The Work Sharp Knife & Tool Sharpener is an innovative abrasive belt sharpening system. The combination of flexible premium abrasive belts and precision sharpening guides create the sharpest blades you've ever had with speed, ease and repeatability. The sharpening guides are purpose built for Kitchen Knives, Outdoor Knives (hunting knives, pocket knives, filet knives, etc.) as well as scissors and serrated knives. This tool can also be used for many other sharpening tasks such as garden pruners, lawn mower blades, shovels and countless other bladed shop and garden tools. This tool is assembled and quality tested in Ashland, Oregon and has a 1 year warranty. Includes a detailed Quick Start Guide and User's Guide.
Before I even begin discussing much else about this sharpener I would like to take a moment to discuss its four sharpening slots. Upon reading consumer reviews, I found that many people were confused by the fact that there were four slots and mistakenly believed that this was a four stage sharpener. This is a two stage sharpener. It has one stage with a rough grit and one stage with a fine grit so that you can adjust the type of sharpening to the dullness of the blade.

I bet those Vikings, relatives of mine no doubt, never had it so good. They never had surated blades to sharpen or needed to wear cool things around their necks to woo the women (they just grabbed them by the hair I guess). I love my stone. So useful and beautiful. I always have spit to wet it with, and I always have a way to sharpen my tool. Wazoo makes high quality products. I give them the highest rating I have. Dudes!
If you want a quality sharpening tool, this is the product to go for. This is why we have rated it as number one due to the incredible service that it will offer you, comes with an ergonomic design that gives the user a secure and comfortable grip. It sharpens knives very fast and more efficiently. It has two stages of sharpening thus providing a chance to sharpen thick steel blades and the softer steel blades.
The thing is, sharpening knives using the popular and traditional sharpening stone method can be very difficult. Many cooks spend years of careful practice perfecting this skill. However, barring a prodigy-level ability to quickly master this ancient technique, there are other options, such as professional sharpening services. But it does generally take multiple knives to get various jobs done, and the $1-$2/inch prices from these craftsmen can add up quickly, especially if you have a lot of dull knives.

Consumers have stated that a lot of metal is removed from the blade if you use all three stages. Usually, however, it is completely unnecessary to use all three stages. Most of the time you can easily get away with only using the fine grit and the honing discs to sharpen your knives. You can even use the honing discs on their own to keep your blades straight. The first stage (the rough grit) will only be necessary for sharpening extremely dull or damaged blades. Upon completing this stage, you will often find that you can skip right over to honing.
The ProntoPro 4643 easily took a top-quality Mac paring knife made of very hard forged Japanese steel from badly dulled to paper-slicing sharp. Initially the knife struggled to slice through the paper and ultimately tore out; after sharpening, it swept through like a razor. And the ProntoPro 4643 was able to sharpen the blade to within ⅜ inch from the handle—that’s excellent compared with many competitors. For each knife, the whole process took about 60 seconds, and the padded handle and level base offered a secure, stable, confidence-inspiring grip.
The product of German, and it works on sharpening standard knives and also Asian style knives at the comfort of your home. It is very easy to use making it very user-friendly. It has a soft grip handle that guarantees the user comfort when using the knife sharpener. The fitted weights and rubber base allows control, durability and heightened balance. The steel construction makes it durable and sturdy.

A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.

I'm a novice knife sharpener. I've had to unlearn what my grandpa taught me in order to use these. So far, I've had decent but mixed results. I've switched to my cheap 200/400-ish cheap tool stone from harbor freight for cutting a bevel when the blade has either been damaged or did not have a proper bevel. The 400/1000 grit stone in this kit is soft. Very soft. I have bowled it out several times. It makes keeping a steady angle difficult. But these stones at this price point are meant for learning, and for that they serve their purpose.
Worksharp is a veteran in sharpening tools, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that your knives will be razor-sharp after the process (sharpening and honing). And, like many users have admitted, you will become obsessed with the sharpness and will start looking for and pulling out every kind of blade in and around the house to work on. It does serious sharpening, and is worth both the money and the time spent learning how to work with the little beast.
I've had this for a while now, about 6 months. It works like a charm. I have a Victorinox chef's knife, it was getting pretty beat up and dull. It took a few times to get the blade to stay sharp, again because of how beat up it was. Now it stays sharp through just about anything. I run it through the AccuSharp about once a week to maintain the blade. I can go from cutting raw sweet potatoes to thin slicing tomatoes. I use my knife daily. The other day on a whim I used the AccuSharp on a Ginsu (don't judge me) Santoku knife to see if it could redeem it. It took quite a few passes, but it did actually help. I thought it was beyond hope and it was left in the drawer forgotten. There is a major nick still, but it is actually usable now. I've used it to sharpen those cheap little paring knives too. So far it's worked on every blade we've put it to. We recently gave one to my father in law and he went to work sharpening every blade he could find! So be warned, you will go hunting for things to sharpen.
Learning sharpening technique requires focus even without worrying about the stone itself. Stones that require frequent flattening, soaking and cleaning, or that take a long time to create an edge can be a source of frustration to some beginning sharpeners. Keep in mind your willingness perform regular maintenance when choosing a starting set of stones.
Home sharpeners use some sort of an abrasive -- either tungsten carbide, ceramic, steel or diamond, which provides the hardest, most aggressive sharpening surface -- to reshape the knife blade. Most have at least two sharpening surfaces to choose from; you start with a coarser grit to remove more steel, then use a finer grit to polish your knife to a smooth edge.
PRECISION SHARPENING GUIDES - provide fast, easy, repeatable & consistent results. Interchangeable sharpening guides to establish precise cutting angles for your knives. Kitchen, filet, & other precision blades use 40° guide. Heavier duty knives such as hunting knives, outdoor knives, & most pocket knives use 50° guide, & includes a 65° guide for sharpening common household scissors, & a guide for sharpening single-sided serrations.
When I bought my electric knife sharpener, I did some online research.  I told my sister about my purchase, and she said, “Why do you need one of those?” This from the woman who has a thousand-dollar sewing machine for her “quilted art.” I thought about her question. The truth is, I don’t need an electric knife sharpener, but the process that brought me to the decision to buy one led to only two options - pre-sliced vegetable and meat purchases, or buying an electric knife sharpener. It was that clear to me.
The thing is, sharpening knives using the popular and traditional sharpening stone method can be very difficult. Many cooks spend years of careful practice perfecting this skill. However, barring a prodigy-level ability to quickly master this ancient technique, there are other options, such as professional sharpening services. But it does generally take multiple knives to get various jobs done, and the $1-$2/inch prices from these craftsmen can add up quickly, especially if you have a lot of dull knives.

Grit choices should fall in line with the steel used to make the knives you plan to sharpen. If your knives are all European, relatively soft steel knives, then you could finish off your knives at the 1,000 – 2,000 grit level. There is a lengthy explanation regarding this topic but suffice it to say that at 2,000 grit, these knives can be made extremely sharp.
At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
This unit looks great, with its stainless steel construction material and soft touch accents. It also works well, but that shouldn’t be a surprise. After all, it’s manufactured by Smith’s Consumer Products, Inc. and they’ve been in the business since 1886. If you need to sharpen straight edge, double-beveled European and American style knives, this is a great option.​

The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.
Sharpening stones are generally less portable than a handheld device, but stones give you more control over the angle of the blade to the sharpening stone. Sharpening systems can include a set of several different sharpening hones. Often, there are at least three stones, including a coarse stone for setting a new sharp cutting edge on very dull or damaged blades, a fine stone for general-purpose sharpening and a natural Arkansas stone for finishing and polishing the cutting edge to a razor-sharp point. Stones can be attached to a stand with a trough on the bottom for easy cleanup or they may stand alone.
People often describe the Trizor XV as putting a 15-degree edge on a blade, but the reality is a bit more complex. It in fact produces what Chef’sChoice calls a Gothic Arch Edge, which consists of three distinct bevels, the final one at 15 degrees. Not surprisingly, the company claims that this “blade architecture” is more durable than a single bevel. More convincingly, the testers at Cook’s Illustrated and America’s Test Kitchen use the Trizor XV on all their knives and actually convert 20-degree knives to the Gothic Arch Edge. (Europe’s medieval cathedrals, too, attest to the strength and durability of the Gothic-arch form.)
A: Like cars, knife sharpeners run the gamut from basic to luxury and like cars the price can vary from extremely affordable to more than some people might want to spend. You can get a high quality sharpener that will put your knives through a 2 or 3-stage process which will result in an incredibly sharp edge for less than $20. Or you can buy a mechanical sharpener that will produce a virtually flawless edge for $200+.
As noted above, both Chef’sChoice and Cook’s Illustrated advocate using the Trizor XV to convert 20-degree knives to the arch-shaped 15-degree edge, so if you have European-style knives, you can still use this machine confidently. You can also use the final honing stage to “strop” serrated knives—helping to keep the teeth polished and aligned—but the Trizor XV cannot resharpen them.
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Our favorite way to sharpen a blade is to use a whetstone—a rectangular block that works almost like sandpaper, helping to straighten and refine the cutting edge on the blade as you slide the knife across it. Most whetstones are designed to be soaked in water before every use, so check the manufacturer's instructions to be sure. (Fun fact: Whetstones aren't actually named for the fact that most are used wet—"whet" is actually just an old word for "sharpen").
★ MOST COMPLETE SET ON AMAZON – Our Sharpening Set is the only kit that comes with both a Flattening Stone and Angle Guide in addition to a Bonus E-Book (for sharpening tips and tricks) and Detailed Instruction Guide. Providing amazing value at a lower price than other sets. A Flattening Stone is a MUST have since all whetstones eventually become uneven and need to be flattened. This set completely eliminates the need to buy one later.
Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.

A honing rod (also known as a honing steel, knife steel, or sharpening steel) is also highly recommended. These are not sharpeners, although they are often thought of that way. Rather, a honing rod helps keep a blade’s edge keen between sharpenings by straightening out the tiny dings and dents caused by everyday slicing and chopping. Honing is a simple and fast process—it takes just a few seconds—and it can extend the life of a sharp edge for weeks or even months. Eventually, however, the edge gets rounded over and dull; then it’s time for a complete resharpening.
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