I purchased this set together with the 400/1000 grit stone assuming that some of my knives were quite dull and would need work on a coarse grit stone. Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 | Knife Sharpener Waterstone with NonSlip Rubber Base & Flattening Stone. This is my first wetstone. First off I tried to sharpen my Chicago Cutlery boning knife. This knife is nearly thirty years old, has been abused in may ways and was quite dull. It was very difficult for me to get a burr on this blade, which I attribute to poor technique. Next I moved on to my Henckels Professional S paring and chef's knives. The paring knife was moderately sharp and was modestly improved after working over all three grits of stone. It would cut paper but again it was difficult to develop a burr with this blade. Undaunted I switched to the chef's knife. This knife is twenty years old and has never been professionally re-sharpened. I have sharpened it twice with a Lanksey sharpening system which marred the finish but did put a good edge on the blade. Lansky Standard Coarse Sharpening System with Fine Hones. The chef's knife was moderately dull and had several pits visible on the cutting surface. I modified my technique for passing the knife over the stone and worked the chef's knife over the 400 grit stone aggressively and eventually I was able to get a burr to form from the tip of the knife all the way to the handle. From there it was a simple process of reforming the burr on the 1000 grit stone and then finishing on the 6000. After sharpening, the chef's knife easily and cleanly slices a tomato with very light pressure and is in my opinion very sharp. Not sushi knife sharp but more than enough for the chopping and slicing I expect of it. I'm looking forward to going back and working both the boning knife and the paring knife over again. Don't expect a good result from this product the first time you use it. Watch videos on using a wetstone, expect to spend at least twenty minutes per knife at first, and practice forming a burr. If you can form a burr, you will be able to successfully sharpen your knife.
Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...
“The Sharpmaker is easy to use, even for a beginner to sharpening, such as myself. Before purchasing the Sharpmaker, I got a sharpening stone as an introduction to sharpening. I failed miserably trying to get comfortable with the sharpening stone, since I was unable to utilize consistent angles of the blade when sharpening. In contrast, the Sharpmaker requires no guessing. You simply hold the knife perfectly straight and run the blade down the rods in the 40- or 30-degree setting. Easy and simple … Similar to how every household should have a set of tools and a first-aid kit, the Sharpmaker is necessary because there is no reason to have a dull knife lying around the house.”
Wicked Edge is unique as it has a vise in the center to clamp the knife and on either side there are two arms with sharpening guides attached. These arms and guides allow you to precisely control the exact angle you want your knife to be sharpened at. The cool thing about this is once you have set the angles and sharpened the knife it’s 100% repeatable when it comes time to touch up again and very, very accurate.

Chef's Choice 316 Diamond Sharpener (for Asian knives - Click here for the latest pricing) for Asian Knives. I have a lot of Asian-style knives so this is pretty important to me. And, I have a couple of German knives that I sharpen to a 15º angle because I like sharp things! So, if you need an economic choice for your Asian-style knives, then check out the Chef's Choice 316 Diamond Sharpener for Asian Knives. You can normally get it for a low to mid price tag, and it does a perfect job on a 15º angle.
A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
The DMD double-sided bench stone sports two different grits: a coarse 400 and fine 1,000. The base is molded ABS plastic and features wide, anti-skid rubber feet to keep the sharpener in place while working on a flat table, counter or bench. The sharpening surface sits in a cavity of the base. To change grits, flip the hone over and return it to the base.
Once you’ve confirmed that you have a dull blade, it is time to begin finding a sharpener. This process isn’t entirely easy. There is an assortment of different sharpening tools, such as sharpening stones, sharpening steels and even electric knife sharpeners. Although each of these serves an identical purpose, they’re tremendously unique. Which is best for you? It is vital to inspect each individual type, in order to get a better understanding of each unique type. This information will be provided below.
If you want a manual knife sharpener that works like most electric sharpeners -- just pull the knife through the slot -- then our top pick is the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 (Est. $65) manual knife sharpener. This knife sharpener has three slots, each armed with diamond-abrasive grinding wheels, and can sharpen a 15 or 20-degree blade; slot one is for a 15-degree blade, while slot two is for a 20-degree blade, and slot three can polish either blade angle.
Similar to electric sharpeners, manual sharpeners simplify the entire sharpening process. However, they tend to have fewer slots for sharpening. One benefit of manual or handheld sharpeners is their portability. Their manual operation, combined with their small size, makes it convenient for cooking professionals who are always on the move. Depending on how the manual sharpener is designed, you can either draw your knife between the slots or the sharpener is moved along the blade of the knife. Whichever type you choose, manual sharpeners easily sharpen a blunt or dull knife, to the desired level of sharpness.
Once you set the sharpener up, start your blade from where the edge starts closest to the tang and run it down the hone, at the same time pulling the blade back toward you, ensuring the hone contacts the entire length of the cutting edge all the way to the tip. Hence, you’re doing two simultaneous motions—moving down the hone and pulling the blade back toward you. Do it all with light pressure.
A: That depends almost entirely on how often you use them. If you are a professional chef who uses his or her knives every day then you should hone them every time you use your knives. But honing has its limits and over time your edge is going to become dull no matter what. Therefore your knives will need to be sharpened at least several times a year. Some chefs, in fact, will use a whetstone on an almost daily basis in order to ensure their knives are always razor sharp. Most of us, however, are not professional chefs and may not even touch our kitchen knives for days at a time. In that case, it’s probably a good idea to hone the edge after every couple of uses and have your knives sharpened once a year.
Functionality – If you have experience with the stick or sharpening stone you likely don’t want or need anything else. If, however, you are in search of an electric-powered sharpener you’ll want to consider how many “stages” you need in your sharpener. In a typical 3-stage sharpener the first stage is the coarsest and does most of the heavy lifting required to turn the edge from dull to sharp. The second stage will have finer grain sharpening wheels. These are used to hone the edge, that is, to smooth out the burrs left by the coarse first stage. A third stage will refine the edge even further and remove any debris left over from the sharpening process.
The smaller the angle between the blade and stone, the sharper the knife will be, but the less side force is needed to bend the edge over or chip it off. The angle between the blade and the stone is the edge angle – the angle from the vertical to one of the knife edges, and equals the angle at which the blade is held. The total angle from one side to the other is called the included angle – on a symmetric double-ground edge (a wedge shape), the angle from one edge to the other is thus twice the edge angle. Typical edge angles are about 20° (making the included angle 40° on a double-ground edge).[1] The edge angle for very sharp knives can be as little as 10 degrees (for a 20° included angle). Knives that require a tough edge (such as those that chop) may sharpen at 25° or more.

Easily Replaceable Parts – When selecting one of these products, you will want to ensure that it is going to provide you with many years of use. In order for this to happen, you need to choose one that has replaceable sharpening pads that can be removed and changed easily! If the process is too complicated, you likely won’t do it and the investment will become a waste. Therefore, it should be easy to change for your convenience.
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.

A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.


For this update, the Spyderco 204MF Tri-Angle Sharpmaker continues its dominion among manual knife sharpeners, while the Chef's Choice 1520 AngleSelect remains our top pick in the electric sharpener category. We've also updated coverage of two new sharpeners introduced in last year's report, the manual Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4642 and the electric Presto EverSharp.
There is very little doubt that Chef’s Choice is responsible for some of the great  knife sharpeners on the market. The Chef’s Choice 320 falls within this category, as well. It is somewhat more expensive than other kitchen knife sharpeners, but it offers a wealth of extra benefits and features. With a 2-stage sharpening system, you can rest assured knowing that this sharpener will get your blades sharp, without damaging them!
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
To use a whetstone you run the knife's blade back and forth across the stone's surface and due to the constant friction with the stone, which acts like a piece of sandpaper, the knife's edge becomes razor sharp and has a brilliant mirror shine. If you are a beginner at using a whetstone it can a take a while to master the sharpening process, so here is a video to help you with your sharpening stone skills.
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We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to chop, dice and slice easily and quickly, you have to keep your blades sharp. Both amateur and professional chefs will appreciate these electric knife sharpeners, which do just that. They will not only save you time, but can also protect expensive knives from damage by ensuring clean and consistent metal removal. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric knife sharpener on Amazon.
Read on in the slides below to learn why the Chef's Choice Trizor XV is our top knife sharpener pick and why you should also consider the Brod & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener, the Edge Pro Apex 4, the Smith's TRI-6 Arkansas TRI-HONE Sharpening System, the Work Sharp Culinary M3 Manual Kitchen Knife Sharpener, the Smith's Edge Pro Adjustable, the Work Sharp WSKTS Knife & Tool Sharpener, the Linkyo Electric Knife Sharpener, and the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 sharpener.

If you want to start hand-sharpening knives, and you’ve never used stones, this kit has everything you need. It includes a medium-grit stone for sharpening and an Arkansas stone for finishing. It also includes a honing solution that protects and cleans the stone’s surface as well as a small plastic guide to help sharpening novices learn the correct angle for sharpening. This is the classic method for sharpening knives, which takes some time to master, but once you learn how to use a stone, you can sharpen knives to any angle you prefer.
The iconic Wiltshire Stay Sharp Knives have been in homes since 1938, and are known and  trusted for their self-sharpening mechanism, as well as providing good quality durable knives. The Wiltshire Mulit-Purpose knife is ideal for slicing and spreading. The wavy serrations on the blade slice bread & tomatoes without tearing with its high quality stainless steel blade. Scabbard sharpens and hones the knife each time the knife is removed, while the triple rivet handle provides strength and durability. The coloured trim is perfect for quick identification in the drawer. The locking system ensures the knife is securely held in place, and has a safety lock button to release the knife.
As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.
Step 2 is to take the time to mark your stone. These marks will show whether or not the lapping plate has flattened a specific area on the stone. Make sure that you make a complete mark from one side of the stone to the other horizontally. The marks will wear away, when the plate has completely flattened each area appropriately. This is the only way to determine if the lapping plate is effectively doing its job.

These are probably the most widely used sharpening tools in the world. The rods are fitted into a handle which you hold on top, while you set the rod’s tip on the table. Then you just glide the knife’s edge along the length of the rod to sharpen it. This will however need some sort of skill on your part, because the wrong angle will just deform your knife instead.

We tested eight other honing rods alongside our pick. Three were ceramic: The Cooks Standard 12″, the Mac black ceramic 10.5″, and the Messermeister 12″. Five were traditional steel hones: Three by Messermeister (regular, fine, and Avanta), a dual-textured fine-and-smooth “combination cut” Victorinox, and a Winware, all 12 inches in length. With one exception, we set a top price of about $40, which eliminated the professional-grade steels made by Friedrich Dick; these are standard in the butchering trade, but few home cooks need their extreme durability and specialization. During testing, we found all the traditional steel honing rods to be too rough on hard Japanese-style blades, causing them to chip, and their slick surfaces made blades of all types slip and skip. The three ceramic rods, like our top pick, offered a slightly grippy surface that made it easy to slide the knife blades smoothly along their length, which is key to good honing. But all were somewhat coarser than the Idahone, so the Idahone was less abrasive to the blades. As well, the Idahone’s generously sized steel hanging ring is superior: The Cooks Standard has a tiny, flimsy ring; the Messermeister has none, just a small hole in the handle; and the Mac’s ring is made of flimsy-feeling plastic. The Mac, which the manufacturer touts as specially suited to its knives, including our pick for chef’s knives, also costs a lot more than the Idahone, at about $55. And its shorter length made honing an 8-inch knife difficult.


At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
In my case it leaves it standing proudly at my sharpening station ready to go to work when I get a knife that just seems to cry out for what the versatility of the Edge Pro delivers. There are certain knives that are difficult to sharpen freehand. There are people who want a mirror finish on their hunting or tactical knives. While one can achieve this either way, the precision offered by the device is capable of creating mirror finishes on bevels that are quite beautiful. What If i want to create a Relief Angle, I can simply do this by grinding at 15 degrees for example and polishing that Relief Angle as much as I want to. Then I can sharpen it at 20 degrees per side and I have an extremely sharp knife that will perform very well in a kitchen.
As with all motorized Chef ’s Choice sharpeners, the 702 will handle steel kitchen knives. However, it also will put the same quality edge on any ceramic kitchen blade. Employing advanced diamond abrasive technology, the 702 features two sharpening slots that hold the knives at pre-set angles, optimized for the best edge on both ceramic and steel blades. Turn the motor on and, using a steady drawing motion, pull the blade through each slot.
A: Experienced professionals know exactly how sharp they want their knives to be and have an instinctive feel for when they’re just right and when they’re even a tiny bit off. Most folks, however, need to have some sort of objective test they can use to determine if in fact their best knife has been properly sharpened. There are a few simple ones you can use:
The iconic Wiltshire Stay Sharp Knives have been in homes since 1938, and are known and  trusted for their self-sharpening mechanism, as well as providing good quality durable knives. The Wiltshire Santoku Knife is ideal for precision cutting and slicing.  The air pockets on the blade reduce cutting resistance and stop vegetables from sticking to the high quality stainless steel blade. Scabbard sharpens and hones the knife each time the knife is removed, while the triple rivet handle provides strength and durability. The coloured trim is perfect for quick identification in the drawer. The locking system ensures the knife is securely held in place, and has a safety lock button to release the knife.
I recently placed my first order after finding you on the web while looking for grinding wheels. I am a customer for life. Here's why. My first order was a simple white grinding wheel for a "normal joe's shop". When I received the wrong wheel (150 grit instead of the ordered 100 grit) I called and without hesitation or the 3rd degree another wheel was sent off. No questioning of my integrity, intelligence or honor. Simply "I am sorry, we'll send the correct wheel off immediately..." The right thing was done by a neat guy. I was treated like an adult. Unbelievable in this day and age...proper...and priceless. Price, performance, responsiveness and customer service par excel-lance. 6-Stars! All my sharpening orders, albeit small shop orders, will now be with you. Promote you I will.
Using the strength of industrial high precision superior mono-crystalline diamonds, Diamond Machining Technology (DMT) have created a durable longer-lasting flat sharpening surface that will efficiently sharpen, hone, deburr and polish almost any type of knife or cutting tool. The DMT set contains 3 one-sided whetstones that have extra-fine, fine, and coarse grits which means you have a complete sharpening system at your fingertips.
What does this mean? Well, you are the only individual, who can determine the best knife sharpener for your own needs. Before attempting to choose, it is vital to know exactly how and how frequently you will be using this tool. Other specific parameters should also be taken into account. Below, you will find information that can help you form a solid foundation.

Storage Allotment – How much space are you willing to allot to your knife sharpener? Although this won’t be such a big deal for some individuals, it will be a major selling point for others. By choosing a smaller product, such as the Chef’s Choice Pronto or the King Sharpening Stone, you will be able to toss your sharpener in a drawer and forget about it, until you need it again. On the other hand, a bigger product, such as an electric or entire sharpening system, will require increased space. Be sure to choose an option that fits your preferences.
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