The Trizor XV employs a three-stage sharpening and honing process using diamond-impregnated cutting wheels. The first time you sharpen a blade, you use the coarsest setting first to establish a completely new bevel. The fine wheels then form a secondary bevel, and finally the honing wheels polish the secondary bevel. The result is an arch-shaped edge that Chef’sChoice claims is more durable than a standard triangular edge. Thereafter, use of the honing wheels and an occasional pass on the fine wheels will keep the edge sharp for months or years before you need to cut an entirely new edge with the coarse wheels.

Our observations about the types of sharpeners on the following pages are based heavily on our experience using them. Why? Because if a sharpener is a pain to use, then it’s going to stay in the drawer where it will be of minimal benefit to our knives. We tried the sharpeners with a variety of knives—all stainless steel—including paring, slicing, boning, utility, and chef’s knives of various lengths; most were tragically dull when we started. We didn’t try serrated, ceramic, or other specialty knives.

Most electric sharpeners use a 2 or 3 step process to create, sharpen and hone the edge of your blade. The first step in the sharpening process involves using a coarse grit, which sharpens extremely dull or damaged blades. The last step in the process uses a fine grit, which hones the blade to the desired finish. When an electric sharpener is turned on, it spins the sharpening stones. These stones sharpen the knife placed in the slots, to the desired sharpness. Most of them come with guides, which allow you to obtain the perfect angle. This makes them popular since they simplify the whole process of sharpening knives.

Sharpening knives becomes effortless and the technology in this electrical unit helps your knife stay sharper for longer. The Trizor XV is engineered by the reputable Edgecraft corporation that was established in 1985 with the sole purpose of creating high quality knife sharpeners. The brand crafts both manual and electrical knife sharpeners with impeccable quality.
Siliciclastic stone is a clastic, noncarbonate, sedimentary stone that is almost exclusively silica-bearing and exists as either a form of quartz or, another silicate mineral. In addition, hardened clay is also a sedimentary stone but, it is formed from organic materials such as plant and animal matter and thus, it is much softer than Siliciclastic However, when silicon sediment is suspended in a clay matrix and then naturally hardened over thousands of years, it forms an excellent whetstone material; although, it is somewhat softer than Novaculite. Thus, because the geology of Japan once held large deposits of this type of stone it has been used for hundreds of years for sharpening tools, knives, and swords. However, unlike Novaculite, Belgian Blue, and Coticule, both natural and synthetic Japanese whetstones use water for lubrication and thus, they are commonly known as “Japanese Water Stones” because this type of stone is very porous. Thus, natural Japanese Water Stones must be soaked in water for up to twenty-four hours prior to use whereas, synthetic Japanese Water Stones can be soaked for only a few moments.
To renew a dull edge, sharpeners use abrasives. By running the knife against the abrasive, you can strip away metal and restore the edge. Different sharpeners use different abrasives: diamond, ceramic, tungsten carbide, natural stone, and manufactured stone, to name a few. These abrasives can range from coarse to fine: 220 grit, for example, is coarse, while  1,000 grit is fine. (The higher the grit number, the finer the abrasive.) Coarse abrasives efficiently strip away metal but rough up the cutting edge. To smooth the edge, many sharpeners also include a fine abrasive.
Step 2 is to take the time to mark your stone. These marks will show whether or not the lapping plate has flattened a specific area on the stone. Make sure that you make a complete mark from one side of the stone to the other horizontally. The marks will wear away, when the plate has completely flattened each area appropriately. This is the only way to determine if the lapping plate is effectively doing its job.
It’s only the 2nd electric powered sharpener on our list but you can’t lose if you make the Chef’s Choice Trizor 15XV your sharpener of choice for double and single bevel Asian knives. This 3-stage sharpener provides something others don’t in that it converts any blade to a hyper-sharp 15 degree blade. The graduated manner by which it reaches that preferred angle also ensures the blade stays sharper, longer. And isn’t that the name of the game?
A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
The synthetic stone is constructed out of aluminum oxide, which is a very abrasive material, but very soft. The main difference between the India and synthetic water stone is the binder that securely holds the abrasive material together. This stone will definitely offer an extremely quick cut. The way this works is the old abrasive material will break away and then will be replaced by a fresh sharp material.
Most users say that the Spyderco Sharpmaker is easy to use, even if its instruction manual can be a little confusing at first. But if you're not comfortable with its relatively open mechanics, consider our best-reviewed knife sharpening kit, the Lansky Professional Sharpening System (Est. $55). This system comes with a clamp that secures the knife blade, four grits of hones from coarse/grinding to ultra-fine, and a triangle-shaped hone for sharpening serrated blades. You attach a guide rod to each hone, then slide the guide rod into a hole on the clamp. Which hole you choose sets the angle for the sharpening: 17, 20, 25 or 30 degrees. Once the guide rod is in place, you swing the hone repeatedly across the edge of the blade at the pre-set angle; anywhere from six to 20 passes with each hone will do the job.
Using a dull knife for such a long time, I had developed a habit of putting a great deal of pressure on my knives when slicing root vegetables like carrots or turnips. I would hold the vegetable in my left hand and press firmly against it with the knife in my right. Sometimes I rested the heel of my left hand on the part of the blade near the tip while drawing the knife down with my right so that I could put even more pressure on the blade.
If your whetstone needs to be soaked, submerge it in water until it's completely saturated and there are no bubbles coming out of it, 5 to10 minutes. To use it, hold the knife at a 20-degree angle against the whetstone, and gently drag each side of the knife against it a few times. Most whetstones have both a "coarse-grind side" and a "fine-grind side"—start with the coarse side if your knife is especially dull, then repeat the process on the fine-grind side.
I am new to sharpening my own blades using a whetstone but this product seems to do a pretty good job even considering my rudimentary technique. It is large enough to work well for a wide range of blade sizes and comes with a nice holder to keep it from moving while sharpening. I was able to get some pretty good edges so I would imagine someone with more experience using this type of product would be able to get some scary sharp edges using it. The only issue I had other than my own lack of skill was that the 1000 grit side seems to be wearing down fairly quickly. I don't know if this is normal or due to something I am doing but if this continues I don't see the stone lasting for many uses and I thought this would be a long lasting product. Again this may be due to user error so please take this with a grain of salt. Overall I think it's very capable and if long lasting an excellent tool for keeping all your blades sharp.
The Chef's Choice 1520 AngleSelect knife sharpener's three sharpening stages can do just about anything. It has a dedicated slot for sharpening 20-degree Western knives, a second slot for sharpening 15-degree Asian knives, and a third slot with a flexible polishing/stropping disk to help polish off a smooth, sharp edge. Spring-loaded blade guides keep everything at just the right angle. This Chef's Choice sharpener is also pretty quiet for an electric model, and very safe.

Of course, some of the better electric models, such as those from Presto, are very stylish and don’t need to be stowed away. Either way, these sharpeners are lightning fast and get the job completed quicker than the others. If you live a hectic lifestyle and don’t have time with the above sharpeners, the electric knife sharpeners from Chef’sChoice and Wusthof are definitely worth checking out! The easy of use and convenience are simply unparalleled. The only negative to these will ultimately be the increase in price.
Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.
The truth is that there is no one recommendation that we can make that will meet everyone’s needs. Every sharpener’s needs are different and every sharpening toolkit will be different. In order to help beginning sharpeners get started with good sharpening stones to build around, we need to understand their individual needs. So with that in mind, let’s look at the basic needs of a beginning sharpener.
This Chef Sharp manual knife sharpener is made to sit solidly on your countertop or whatever workspace you like. Its soft, rubbery bottom provides the perfect non-slip surface no matter what type of material you are working on. The smoothest of countertops will be no match for this sharpener, it will stay perfectly still as you work. To offer extra stability and support, this sharpener also includes a horizontal steel handle. Holding onto this handle will not only help to keep your sharpener steady, it will also keep you steady as you draw your blade through either of the two sharpening slots.
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.

Mospro knife sharpener has great qualities, and it has received positive reviews from people who have tried it. It has a comfortable handle and a non-slip cushion on the bottom that keeps it secured when placed on a surface. The knife sharpener is very easy to use. It comes in a material that makes it very durable hence providing excellent service to the user. The two stage coarse and fine sharpening system does not disappoint the user.

Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 
I'm a novice knife sharpener. I've had to unlearn what my grandpa taught me in order to use these. So far, I've had decent but mixed results. I've switched to my cheap 200/400-ish cheap tool stone from harbor freight for cutting a bevel when the blade has either been damaged or did not have a proper bevel. The 400/1000 grit stone in this kit is soft. Very soft. I have bowled it out several times. It makes keeping a steady angle difficult. But these stones at this price point are meant for learning, and for that they serve their purpose.
As a cook, I like to think my kitchen ducks are in a row. Recipe reviewed? Check. Ingredients prepped? Always. Work space organized and tidy? Of course. Knives sharp? Um… well… OK, I’ll confess: Knife sharpening usually falls by the wayside. But I’m not alone. When I was preparing for this article, I borrowed dozens of knives from fellow cooks, and judging from the condition of those blades, it seems that lots of other cooks are lax about sharpening their knives, too.
Our lineup included sharpening stones, a variety of manually operated sharpeners in several designs, and electric machines. Some of the devices were costly; others, cheap. Some were surprisingly easy to use; others had a steeper learning curve, requiring dexterity, coordination, or patience. But overall, we were pleasantly surprised to find most of the sharpeners fairly easy to use and effective. By the end of our research, we felt confident that transforming a blade from dull to sharp is much easier than we had imagined.

We bought this for our parents as a little random gift to have at their home. I suggest using it for your cheaper everyday knives. It sharpens really well! The only drawback is that my husband noticed that eventually it bent some a few of the cheapo knives. The knives were cheap, but this sharpener ended up damaging them (but still got them to be sharper). If you don't really care for the little dings and changes to a small portion of your knife, as we don't with our cheap ones, it's still worth using! I suggest to only use them on your more inexpensive knives because I'm not sure how I'd feel using them on more expensive knives, because you really don't want to damage those in case it does the same thing to them!


However, when sharpened to a 25 or 30 degree angle with carbide scraping, those wide angles are NOT more durable! That’s because the edge has those microscopic serrations which bend over easily. That means any knife sharpened with this type of tool will require more frequent sharpening. It also means your freshly sharpened kitchen knife will deposit microscopic chunks of steel into your food. Before you panic about that, think about technique!
3-STAGE KNIFE SHARPENER: Sharpen dull knife quickly with the incredible 3-stage knife sharpening system. The 2nd diamond slot provides general sharpening before the 1st tungsten slot repairs and straightens damaged blades, the 3rd ceramic slot fine tunes for a clean polish. QUICKLY BRING BACK SHARP BLADE : Why spend more money buying a new knife? With this kitchen knife sharpener, you can recycle your old, dull knife and sharpen them back to life. HIGH QUALITY:This best knife sharpener made of ceramic, diamond, tungsten steel and high quality ABS plastic. It's very safe, stable, durable. EASY TO USE: Simply place your dull knife in the sharpening slot and gently pull the knife through a few times for fast, effective sharpening.
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.
We have taken 6 different knife sharpeners to compare. We tested them in situations which were as similar as possible and used them according to the instructions of the manufacturer. If necessary, we kept sharpening until it was simply impossible to increase the sharpness of the knife. First we blunted some Eden Classic Damast Chef’s knives on a whet stone. By cutting paper, we were able to check whether the condition of each of the knives was equally blunt. Then we started sharpening and after doing so, tested the edge on a piece of paper again. Sometimes a knife may seem sharp after sharpening, but actually this ‘sharpness’ is caused by a false burr. That means that the knife has not yet reached it proper V-shape, but that a burr was created which makes the knife appear sharp. After a few cuts in paper, this burr will wear down and you will find the knife is still blunt, or at least, not as sharp as expected.
Ease of Use – Are you willing to take the time to learn to properly sharpen your knife? When looking for a sharpener, you should remember that some of these products are capable of operating for you, while others require a little bit more effort. If you’re not willing to put in the effort, you should rely on devices that are effortless, such as electric and pull-through models. Knife sharpening systems are fairly easy to use, as well!
As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
Typically, you will first need to clamp the blade into place and tighten a knob, in order to secure it to the system. After this, you’ll need to work to adjust the angle. This is generally controlled by a little knob. Once you’ve selected the angle, you will be able to lock it into place to ensure that the angle is maintained throughout the sharpening process for a much more consistent edge.

After this has been completed, you will be able to select your preferred sharpening stone and bring it down to the blade. At this point, you will be able to begin sharpening the blade. If you choose the right system, such as the KME Precision Knife Sharpening System, you will be able to flip the knife around, without removing it. This will help to ensure that both sides of the blade receive the exact edge that you desire. Although this might seem complicated, the process is actually very simple and effortless, after you’ve done it a few times. Still, you will need to check the instruction manual provided with your system for correct usage procedures. 
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