We used the honing rods on multiple knives, including our top pick for chef’s knives, the 8-inch Mac MTH-80—a hard Japanese blade—and a vintage 12-inch Wüsthof, a German knife with a softer blade. That covers the two main types of knives that people commonly own. To dull the knives between tests, we repeatedly sawed through 1-inch-thick hemp rope, a classic challenge used by knifemakers to demonstrate their blades’ durability. We focused on 12-inch rods, because a longer rod is easier to use—it offers more room to sweep the length of a standard 8- or 10-inch chef’s knife.

I have heard some people say that using the Edge Pro for sharpening is easier. I do not believe this to be true. Yes, it has the potential to create very sharp knives and do that every single time but that doesn’t make it easier. I can throw a water stone onto the stone holder and be in bliss in a matter of seconds. What makes this device shine is that it removes the obstacles that novice sharpeners face and does just what the creator of the Edge Pro says it does, it sharpen knives and it does it very well.


A honing rod (also known as a honing steel, knife steel, or sharpening steel) is also highly recommended. These are not sharpeners, although they are often thought of that way. Rather, a honing rod helps keep a blade’s edge keen between sharpenings by straightening out the tiny dings and dents caused by everyday slicing and chopping. Honing is a simple and fast process—it takes just a few seconds—and it can extend the life of a sharp edge for weeks or even months. Eventually, however, the edge gets rounded over and dull; then it’s time for a complete resharpening.
Most culinary professionals will agree: few tools get as much use in the kitchen as the iconic chef's knife. These medium-to-large-sized beauties are often flashy and usually razor-sharp. Most kitchen workers and home cooks swear by them as their most treasured piece of equipment. And when something is that important to your food and your career, keeping it in great condition is of utmost importance.

For multi-stage manual sharpening, we highly recommend the Spyderco 204MF Tri-Angle Sharpmaker System (Est. $70), which has held the top spot in this report for several years now. This sharpener has two sets of triangular rods -- miniature sharpening stones in fine and medium grits -- that fit into its plastic base at preset angles. You hold the knife horizontally, blade edge pointing down, then draw it back across the sharpening rods on first one side, then the other. An included DVD gives more detail on how to do this; the process is easy and simple once you see a visual example.
Inspect the Handle – First and foremost, you will want to inspect the handle. Will it be comfortable, when it is held within your hand? Is the handle perfectly attached to the sharpening steel? Before purchasing one of these items, it is essential to look at the handful very carefully and ensure that it is well made and will provide you with long-term comfortable use and satisfaction. If the sharpening steel detaches from the handle, your purchase will likely be for naught. Therefore, this element is vital!

Be aware that few sharpeners of any type can properly sharpen serrated knives; that’s a job best left to a professional, so we didn’t knock points off our test models if they lacked the capability. Luckily, serrated knives tend to stay sharp for years and years, since it’s the teeth (rather than the edge) that do most of the work. For this review we focused on the sort of knives that sharpeners are designed for: those with standard, straight-edged blades, such as paring and chef’s knives.


The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).

Despite their name, sharpening steels don’t sharpen knives in actual sense. Their main job is honing a knife blade. However, certain styles or cuts can perform some minor sharpening. You should note that steels that sharpen knives should not be used in place of normal sharpeners. The most common types of cuts include diamond, regular, ceramic or combination. The differences in these cuts are subtle. The choice of cuts depends on what you want to achieve with the honing steel, as well as your budget


The results I’ve obtained using the Wicked Edge are truly amazing. When I put a full mirror edge on my knives (as outlined below) they can literally whittle hair and “pop” the hair clean off your arm! If you are so inclined you can turn the Wicked Edge into a small business sharpening for the local population or at the various shows. I know several people who do this on a regular basis.
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While sharpeners remove material from the blade and can make an unusable knife seem new again, honing rods simply uncurl the very edge of the knife and keep it from starting to become dull. That being said, many heavily-used knives will benefit from a monthly sharpening in addition to daily honing. And that's just the beginning of understanding sharpness.
I give Sharp Pebble a top rating for two reasons. First, the company emailed a user guide for me to review and learn how to best use its product while it was being shipped to me. Wonderfully proactive. Second, the sharpening stone did a terrific job restoring the edge on my kitchen knives that had been woefully neglected. Ever rent a house and every knife in the kitchen has the edge of a butter knife? I was almost there. Now, the knives are cutting beautifully. I have only one suggestion for Sharp Pebble. While the stone includes a useful angle guide that can be attached to a blade and the guide gives clear steps on prepping the stone and how to hold the blade when sharpening, it does not illustrate the manner in which the blade needs to be moved across the stone. I had to go to Youtube to get some tips on the exact method. I have historically been very bad at putting an edge on a blade due to ignorance primarily. But with the help of the video and a good stone, I did an effective job. The base does a great job of holding the stone in place and is attractive in the kitchen.

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
Worksharp is a veteran in sharpening tools, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that your knives will be razor-sharp after the process (sharpening and honing). And, like many users have admitted, you will become obsessed with the sharpness and will start looking for and pulling out every kind of blade in and around the house to work on. It does serious sharpening, and is worth both the money and the time spent learning how to work with the little beast.
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