The Spyderco 2014MF Tri-Angle's open construction and pre-set angles mean you can use it to sharpen just about anything, including 20-degree Western knives, 15-degree Asian knives, serrated blades and scissors. Users say the learning curve is quick and the results are great, and optional diamond sharpening rods remove enough steel to re-shape even damaged blades. The angled sharpening rods do double duty as safety rails to protect your hands.

OMG is the only thing that comes to mind! After researching any number of GOOD home knife sharpeners from $5 to $100, I stumbled upon this one and its very good reviews. So....I bit the bullet, purchased one (the ORIGINAL not the knock-offs you see). We have a collection of some 15 high end knives that had been sharpened by me using a lesser pull through sharpener. I set the SunrisePro on the countertop and followed the simple instructions. With just a little pressure on the top edge of each knife, i drew each blade edge through the tungsten-carbide cutters. After four or five pulls-through, I could see some almost microscopic metal shavingS accumulating on the top of the unit and a little on the counter. You could feel the knife taking on an edge it never had before! When I finished one knife, it was so incredibally sharp to the point of being intimidating! I simply could not belive how scalpel-like sharp the edge was now. I went through all 15 knives from paring to big 12 inch carver/slicer and each came out the sharpest they perhaps ever had been. WOW! Now we have an entire knife block filled with superbly sharp kitchen knives. Trying each one out on different meats, fruits, etc, you can hardly feel the knife as it slices cleanly through whatever you are cutting. Just "resting" the newly sharpened knife on a tomato, the edge actually began to cut through the skin with NO downward pressure. Seriously! I will not insult my review by saying something like "For the money...." It may simply be the best overall home knife sharpener around at ANY cost.. And yes, I even sharpened our garden hedge clippers to razor like condition. Bravo to whoever designed this. Even if I wear it out, I will certainly buy another! Nuf said. Dr. Z
Our only gripe about this sharpener is the terminology used in its documentation. When the Spyderco manual refers to a 40-degree knife edge, it's actually referencing what most knife-makers and manufacturers or sharpeners would call a 20-degree blade, the standard for Western kitchen knives. The reason for this disconnect is because Spyderco is measuring all the way across the blade, while most others measure just one side of the blade at a time. What Spyderco calls a 30-degree blade would typically be called a 15-degree blade, the standard for Asian kitchen knives, although some Western manufacturers are beginning to use this narrower blade angle as well.
I've only used it to touch up the edge on an ESEE RB3 and a pocket folder so far, but it has done very nicely for those tasks. I found that using the rounded edge works best for me in order to be able to run the length of the blade without hitting the leather lanyard. I'll hopefully try it out soon on fish hooks, too. A worthy and handy accessory, and cool looking necklace, to boot!
Our observations about the types of sharpeners on the following pages are based heavily on our experience using them. Why? Because if a sharpener is a pain to use, then it’s going to stay in the drawer where it will be of minimal benefit to our knives. We tried the sharpeners with a variety of knives—all stainless steel—including paring, slicing, boning, utility, and chef’s knives of various lengths; most were tragically dull when we started. We didn’t try serrated, ceramic, or other specialty knives.
Yes, I now believe that we can make knives as sharp and in fact sharper by sharpening freehand than we can using only the Edge Pro. This does not mean that we can discard our systems and just stick to freehand sharpening. Remember, this did not happen overnight, it came with hundreds and hundreds of sharpening sessions and also, I always knew that the Edge Pro was there If I needed it. Also, remember, I am obsessed with knife sharpening, this is all I think about so that perhaps has had an impact on my ability to sharpen knives.

It is designed to help sharpen straight bladed knives that are made of steel. It cannot be used on ceramic and serrated edges. The two sharpening modes guarantee the user gets the best service from it. It has been designed with the users’ safety in mind. This is due to the large grip handle and the non-slip feet. It has an attractive design that makes it a great addition to any kitchen.
Naniwa also makes the Naniwa Traditional line of stones, these are less expensive than the Professional lineup and I believe were created to compete in terms of cost with some other brands such as King that are less expensive, more attractive to some who are just starting and may not want to invest a lot of money. I have tried the Naniwa Traditional 220, 1,000 and 2,000 grit stones and I thoroughly enjoyed them, so if you are considering a less expensive brand to get started, these are also good. I do not like them as much as the Professional line but I do like them, they work, they make the knives sharp.
Once the burr is removed, it's time to test the sharpness with paper. Hold a piece of newspaper at about 45°, with a bit of tension, and slash lightly with each point of the blade. If it cuts through easily, your knife's sharp. Warner speedily lacerated his newspaper, but I of course struggled. There is an element of technique involved, he reassured me. 
Feedback is something that is very important to most sharpeners, i.e. how the stone feels when you are using it. Does it feel smooth, creamy and silky or does it feel hard and scratchy. While feedback, pleasant or unpleasant may be a purchase deterring factor it really doesn’t have any effect on level of sharpness that the stone can deliver. Unless of course the feedback is so distracting that it hinders the sharpeners focus and enjoyment and as a result, the sharpener doesn’t like what he/she is doing so that ultimately it does have the potential to negatively impact the results.
The absolute pinnacle of sharpness is achieved by using water stones. This does not mean that talented folks using other methods can make knives extraordinary sharp, they do it every day, I love those guys. I am saying that the absolute summit can only be reached with water stones. This should not be the deciding factor for you though, the absolute pinnacle could be just a little bit sharper than your sharpest knife. Your sharpest knife sharpened by your method is likely sharper than the majority of knives out there. I recommend having a stone combination that includes fine, medium and coarse grits.

Feedback is something that is very important to most sharpeners, i.e. how the stone feels when you are using it. Does it feel smooth, creamy and silky or does it feel hard and scratchy. While feedback, pleasant or unpleasant may be a purchase deterring factor it really doesn’t have any effect on level of sharpness that the stone can deliver. Unless of course the feedback is so distracting that it hinders the sharpeners focus and enjoyment and as a result, the sharpener doesn’t like what he/she is doing so that ultimately it does have the potential to negatively impact the results.


Naniwa also makes the Naniwa Traditional line of stones, these are less expensive than the Professional lineup and I believe were created to compete in terms of cost with some other brands such as King that are less expensive, more attractive to some who are just starting and may not want to invest a lot of money. I have tried the Naniwa Traditional 220, 1,000 and 2,000 grit stones and I thoroughly enjoyed them, so if you are considering a less expensive brand to get started, these are also good. I do not like them as much as the Professional line but I do like them, they work, they make the knives sharp.
Additional information for residents of Quebec only: The regular annual rate for persons applying for the Triangle credit card is 22.99% for cash transactions and related fees and 19.99% for all other charges. Some applicants may receive a higher or lower regular annual rate depending on a credit evaluation. The minimum payment is the sum of (a) interest and fees shown on your statement, (b) the greater of any amount past due or any balance over your credit limit, (c) the amount of any equal payments plan instalments then due, and (d) $10. Balances under $10 are due in full. For residents of Quebec, the period between the statement date and the due date for payment is 26 days. The billing period covered by each statement can be from 28-33 days. The Triangle Mastercard does not have an annual fee. Examples of borrowing costs (rounded to the nearest cent) assuming that all charges are purchases bearing interest at the regular annual rate of 19.99%, a 30 day month, no charges made on special payment plans and no other fees, additional payments or other changes are:

If you want to skip the learning curve entirely and save some money at the same time, one of the best knife sharpeners we found is also one of the cheapest. The design of the AccuSharp 001 Knife and Tool Sharpener (Est. $10) couldn't be simpler: It's nothing but a plastic handle with a slot containing a tiny, replaceable tungsten carbide sharpening surface. You place the knife to be sharpened on a table, blade up, and position the AccuSharp over the knife blade. Then you apply light pressure as you pull the AccuSharp along the length of the blade.
You might not need to spend hundreds of pounds to get the best knife sharpener, but you do need to know what you're doing. Warner gave me a crash course in the technique. As a newbie to this method, it took a while to get used to (especially since Warner handed me a knife that had never previously been sharpened) but after half an hour's practice and a little encouragement, I got the hang of it. Here's what I learned...
Then, to start sharpening, pull your knife through the "coarse" slot (made of carbide steel) and then the "fine" slot (made of ceramic). Depending how dull your knives are, it can work well in one swipe, or require multiple passes. My knives were so dull, it took about 20 passes on each side. Also, make sure to use some pressure: At first, I was too light with my swipes, but as soon as I stepped it up — magic.
Sharpening stones have been around since the dawn of civilization for a very good reason: they work. Yes, they’re more labor intensive than most electric sharpeners but they also allow you an unprecedented level of control. Once you get used to something like the Fallkniven DC3 Diamond/Ceramic Whetstone Sharpener you may never take out your electric sharpener again.

To select our best-reviewed knife sharpeners, we considered four factors: performance, ease of use, safety and, for electric sharpeners, the noise level. To rate knife sharpeners on these criteria, we consulted professional comparison tests at sites such as Cook's Illustrated, Wirecutter and Wired. We also looked at more casual tests in newspaper articles and on consumer websites.


Manual sharpeners are, in my opinion, the best way to sharpen your knives. They are my personal favorite, because they allow you to sharpen your blades with precision. Unlike electric sharpeners which can take off layers of steel so quickly you barely see it happen, you maintain control over the sharpening process with a manual sharpener. You can put one pass through, then check your edge. You can do another pass or two, then check it again.


Visually, a very sharp knife has an edge that is too small to see with the eye; it may even be hard or impossible to focus in a microscope. The shape near the edge can be highlighted by rotating the knife and watching changes in reflection. Nicks and rolled edges can also be seen, as the rolled edge provides a reflective surface, while a properly straightened edge will be invisible when viewed head-on.
Users say they love how the Work Sharp Ken Onion Edition Knife and Tool Sharpener -- essentially a miniature belt grinder -- gives them a blend of old school sharpening technique and convenience features like a variable-speed trigger control and blade guides. Switching between the 3/4-inch abrasive belts is quick and easy, with no special tools required, and the roughest belt is tough enough to sharpen serious tools like lawnmower blades.
“The Sharpmaker is easy to use, even for a beginner to sharpening, such as myself. Before purchasing the Sharpmaker, I got a sharpening stone as an introduction to sharpening. I failed miserably trying to get comfortable with the sharpening stone, since I was unable to utilize consistent angles of the blade when sharpening. In contrast, the Sharpmaker requires no guessing. You simply hold the knife perfectly straight and run the blade down the rods in the 40- or 30-degree setting. Easy and simple … Similar to how every household should have a set of tools and a first-aid kit, the Sharpmaker is necessary because there is no reason to have a dull knife lying around the house.”
This is a great value for those who want a complete set of Shapton stones- from fine to coarse grit. The Shapton glass stone is the essential sharpening tool for any professional or home cook serious about knife care. A synthetic stone with a high degree of uniform abrasion, the Shapton needs no soaking. Compared to other synthetic stones, it creates an edge faster and doesn't wear down as quickly. So the Shapton glass stone makes shaping your knife easier and more convenient. And even when the abrasive surface becomes paper-thin, this stone still performs, thanks to its sturdy glass backing plate. Shapton glass stones are also engineered to produce no odor, unlike regular whetstones, which can leave an unpalatable odor on knives unless they're carefully cleaned. This is a distinct advantage for cooks who need to quickly shape their knives in the heat of service. The Shapton HR (High Resistance) glass stone series is suitable for both stain-resistant and carbon steel knives. Use the #500 to create a new, rough edge or fix small chips, the #2000 to create a cutting edge and the #16000 to polish and smooth out the edge.
Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
Most professional knife makers mainly use flexible belts, when putting a razor sharp edge on the blades. You can now use the same technology at home to sharpen your knives, every time they become dull. You might have other sharpening tools and methods at home. However, it is quite hard to find one that does the job better and faster than the Work Sharp WSKTS-KT Knife sharpener.
I recently placed my first order after finding you on the web while looking for grinding wheels. I am a customer for life. Here's why. My first order was a simple white grinding wheel for a "normal joe's shop". When I received the wrong wheel (150 grit instead of the ordered 100 grit) I called and without hesitation or the 3rd degree another wheel was sent off. No questioning of my integrity, intelligence or honor. Simply "I am sorry, we'll send the correct wheel off immediately..." The right thing was done by a neat guy. I was treated like an adult. Unbelievable in this day and age...proper...and priceless. Price, performance, responsiveness and customer service par excel-lance. 6-Stars! All my sharpening orders, albeit small shop orders, will now be with you. Promote you I will.

Sharpening knives becomes effortless and the technology in this electrical unit helps your knife stay sharper for longer. The Trizor XV is engineered by the reputable Edgecraft corporation that was established in 1985 with the sole purpose of creating high quality knife sharpeners. The brand crafts both manual and electrical knife sharpeners with impeccable quality.
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