I've had this for a while now, about 6 months. It works like a charm. I have a Victorinox chef's knife, it was getting pretty beat up and dull. It took a few times to get the blade to stay sharp, again because of how beat up it was. Now it stays sharp through just about anything. I run it through the AccuSharp about once a week to maintain the blade. I can go from cutting raw sweet potatoes to thin slicing tomatoes. I use my knife daily. The other day on a whim I used the AccuSharp on a Ginsu (don't judge me) Santoku knife to see if it could redeem it. It took quite a few passes, but it did actually help. I thought it was beyond hope and it was left in the drawer forgotten. There is a major nick still, but it is actually usable now. I've used it to sharpen those cheap little paring knives too. So far it's worked on every blade we've put it to. We recently gave one to my father in law and he went to work sharpening every blade he could find! So be warned, you will go hunting for things to sharpen.

If you want to skip the learning curve entirely and save some money at the same time, one of the best knife sharpeners we found is also one of the cheapest. The design of the AccuSharp 001 Knife and Tool Sharpener (Est. $10) couldn't be simpler: It's nothing but a plastic handle with a slot containing a tiny, replaceable tungsten carbide sharpening surface. You place the knife to be sharpened on a table, blade up, and position the AccuSharp over the knife blade. Then you apply light pressure as you pull the AccuSharp along the length of the blade.


The basic concept of sharpening is simple – you're using an abrasive edge to remove metal – but the knife you buy may alter the method you should use. A general rule of thumb is that a waterstone can be used for both Japanese- and Western-style blades, but you should avoid pull-through sharpeners for Japanese knives (or any knife with very brittle blades).
Every continent—Europe, Asia, and the Americas, seem to have their own knife design traits, so it can be a bother to find a sharpener that suits your knife. And this is especially true if you have lots of different knives from different areas in the world. Add the fact that your sharpener has to deal with serrated as well as straight-edged knives, and it may seem as if you’ll need more than one sharpener to take care of them all.
A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
For all the coolness and artsiness the sharpening process promises to make you look and feel, it’s not even that complicated. With guide rods and a knife clamp, the kit allows you to easily sharpen your knives to various angle options with satisfying precision. It hones basically any type of knives: chef’s, butcher, fillet, and even knives for hunting and outdoor uses. There’s a small bottle of honing oil included, if you’re wondering.

Why spend hundreds of dollars on a knife sharpening machine when you can get your knives razor sharp for the price of a cheap necktie? It won’t take more than a few practice sessions to learn how to get your knives professionally sharp with the Lansky 8” Ceramic Sharp Stick. This device is simplicity incarnate and yet it does the job of electric sharpeners costing many times more.
Once I figured out what I wanted in my sharpening system I just needed to find a product that suited my particular needs. I set out on a mission during Blade Show 2014 to find the perfect knife sharpening system. After looking at various systems such as Work Sharp, Edge Pro-Apex, Spyderco’s Sharpmaker and all the random assorted loose stones I finally settled on the Wicked Edge to sharpen my knives.
Sharpening on water stones is traditional, it carries with it a sense of pride. For me, I think of the men that I would like to talk the most in my life, those Master Sharpeners in Japan, those gentle and kind men that have dedicated their lives to sharpening knives, it goes back in history, it is a very special feeling being part of this. THIS is what drives me the most, yes the sharp knives are awesome but doing this with my bare hands, doing something my dad and his dad did, using a skill that I have spent years and years improving is a privilege. Coming from a person who sharpens knives every day for people, if I could only choose one method of sharpening knives it would be freehand, there is no question about that.

But if the edge it produces isn’t the absolute best (that honor goes to the Trizor XV), why consider the Brød & Taylor? Two reasons. First, its footprint is small enough—4½ by 3½ inches in breadth and depth, and 6½ inches high—that you can keep it on the counter, meaning you’ll be more likely to hone your knives every time you use them, a good practice that too few people are disciplined enough to follow since it generally means pulling a knife steel out of a drawer or knife block. Second, this sharpener is so elegant to look at and so simple to employ that it almost encourages you to use it. Whether you respond accordingly is a matter of personal taste and dedication, of course, but knowing our readers, I’m sure at least a few value such things highly.
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
If you are a fan of matching your small appliances and gadgetry to your interior décor you will be quite pleased to hear that this sharpener is available in three different colors – black, lime green, and red. That being said, I don’t think it should be all that important, considering that this sharpener is so small it can easily be tossed in a drawer or backpack for safe keeping.

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
Be aware that few sharpeners of any type can properly sharpen serrated knives; that’s a job best left to a professional, so we didn’t knock points off our test models if they lacked the capability. Luckily, serrated knives tend to stay sharp for years and years, since it’s the teeth (rather than the edge) that do most of the work. For this review we focused on the sort of knives that sharpeners are designed for: those with standard, straight-edged blades, such as paring and chef’s knives.
I am new to sharpening my own blades using a whetstone but this product seems to do a pretty good job even considering my rudimentary technique. It is large enough to work well for a wide range of blade sizes and comes with a nice holder to keep it from moving while sharpening. I was able to get some pretty good edges so I would imagine someone with more experience using this type of product would be able to get some scary sharp edges using it. The only issue I had other than my own lack of skill was that the 1000 grit side seems to be wearing down fairly quickly. I don't know if this is normal or due to something I am doing but if this continues I don't see the stone lasting for many uses and I thought this would be a long lasting product. Again this may be due to user error so please take this with a grain of salt. Overall I think it's very capable and if long lasting an excellent tool for keeping all your blades sharp.
The continuous angle adjustment feature will allow you to select a specific angle from 17-30 degrees, in 1 degree increments, which will offer unlimited options. It also comes with 4 different sharpening diamond stones including the 140 extra-coarse, 300 coarse, 600 fine, and the 1500 extra fine. You will never be forced to purchase another sharpening stone to ensure that every coarse level is covered, because these diamond hones will perfect your blade edge, in no time at all.
The EdgePro’s costumer service. The after purchase service by Mr. Ben Dale is absolutely superb, he will personally answer emails within 24 hours or sooner, years after the original purchase. Even if you are asking him about another system like the KME or Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener, he is a true gentleman and will gain your respect immediately. I don’t know if I have every met anyone like Ben to be honest, he is that good.
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