If you are a fan of matching your small appliances and gadgetry to your interior décor you will be quite pleased to hear that this sharpener is available in three different colors – black, lime green, and red. That being said, I don’t think it should be all that important, considering that this sharpener is so small it can easily be tossed in a drawer or backpack for safe keeping.
I highly recommend this to anyone who uses a knife. I am a cook, I have many people I work with now purchasing these after they have used mine and I also bought one for my step-dad and he loves it. Well worth the price, I use these on my knives at home and for work. Please read the directions and use accurately as a co-worker injured himself by not following correct procedure, remember, these are knives and are very sharp, you are sharpening them! Common sense people. Remember also to use a steel and hone your knives, please research if you do not know the difference between sharpening and honing.

Looking at the performance, it is hard to find a sharpening stone on the market that performs better than this one. This one is simply irreplaceable. Furthermore, using this stone is a straightforward process. You just sprinkle some water on the surface and then push and pull your blade across. After a few strokes, your knife is sharp and ready. In addition, it doesn’t require too much water consumption. You don’t have to stop every now and then to sprinkle water.

The main drawback to this design is that the heel of the knife doesn't get sharpened because you have to get this thing right on the corner of the heel in order for the whole length of the edge to be sharpened. Since this thing shaves lots of metal off the knife, you end up with a heel that's taller than the rest of the edge, rendering the knife unable to chop properly. Anything attempting to be chopped close to the heel will simply not be chopped. Just dented.

I purchased three expensive and beautiful knives and although the company representative would drive out to sharpen them for me whenever I called, there was always a sales pitch for purchasing more knives. And there was the guilt factor of making him drive for an hour to spend fifteen minutes sharpening my knives. I bought a cake server and a cheese knife and a vegetable peeler before I stopped calling him.
The Priority Chef Knife Sharpener is versatile, safe and easy to use. This professional knife sharpener is designed in such a way that it’s easy to use. You don’t have to be a seasoned chef or meat handler, to know how to sharpen your knife with this product. You simply position your blunt blade on the sharpening slot and then enjoy a razor sharp edge in just a matter of seconds. There are no risks or safety issues involved when using this knife. In addition to that, it can be used in all blade types, including the hard steel blades, which are of high quality.

Another way I use and recommend: Sharpening Systems. It is safe to say that in terms of guided sharpening systems there are two that are a cut above the rest, the EdgePro and Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener. My only experience is with the Edge Pro. Ben Dale, the creator of the Edge Pro, is a man I have shared countless emails with, and his system does work, it is a wonderful sharpening device.


Both Belgian Blue and Vielsalm Coticule are ancient stone layers found in the Belgian Ardenne Mountains with characteristics similar to both Novaculite and Siliciclastic sedimentary stone in that it is a metamorphic stone consisting of both gray and yellow volcanic ash mixed with tiny Spessartite Garnet crystals suspended in a clay matrix. However, due to its geology, both types of stone occur only in vertical seams sandwiched between two thick layers of bluish-purple slate and thus, they must be meticulously extracted mostly by hand. However, this type of extraction process is both very time-consuming and very labor-intensive and, quarrymen can only extract the stone for a few months each year due to inclement weather conditions. Consequently, both Belgium Blue and Coticule whetstones tend to be somewhat expensive.
I bought this originally so I could tear it apart and review that it was nothing but a fanboy product. I got so tired of hearing how great it was from all the tacti-morons. Well, I'm eating those words, because it actually IS great. Learning curve is very small, and when you use the right belts for the right blade, and realize to let it do the work without forcing it to, it works very, very well. It puts an edge on a dull knife from 420C to D2, S30V and CPM154. It polishes that edge. It hones it. I strop it anyway, and it makes short work of sharpening. I love using stones, but I do that for a hobby mostly. If I want a fast and sharp edge, I have this thing ready to go now. You don't need the more expensive Ken Onion edition unless you have knives that fall out of the general category, the regular workshop will do fine. I've done outdoor knives up to and including a BK2 and small as a pocket folder. If you get the diamond belts, you can do ceramic knives as well and remove chips or hone the edges perfectly. Takes no skill to operate, but that's assuming general intelligence and the ability to read instructions.

To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.


I understand that I am missing some items here but that’s not important, most people will make up their own minds on what method of sharpening is best for them. In my dream sharpening setup, I would have all my water stones, the Edge Pro Professional and the Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener. If the most important thing to you is making your knives sharp and you just don’t think you will have the time or patience to learn to free hand sharpen that the Edge Pro Apex is likely perfect for you.


Table mounted device – Typically the manual powered table mounted sharpener looks virtually identical to the electric powered sharpener with a slot for each stage. Where they differ is that each slot in the manual powered sharpener has only one groove and you pull the blade through this groove toward you to sharpen the blade. Once the blade is sufficiently sharp you place it in the honing groove to refine the edge and pull it toward you again several times. If there is a third, cleaning, stage you repeat the process for that stage as well.

For all the coolness and artsiness the sharpening process promises to make you look and feel, it’s not even that complicated. With guide rods and a knife clamp, the kit allows you to easily sharpen your knives to various angle options with satisfying precision. It hones basically any type of knives: chef’s, butcher, fillet, and even knives for hunting and outdoor uses. There’s a small bottle of honing oil included, if you’re wondering.
You want sharpening stones that will be useful for the majority of your edges now, and that will remain useful as you expand both your tools and your sharpening toolkit in the future. Ending up with duplicate stones or ones that are no longer useful as you gain new knives or tools is a waste of money. The goal is to start with something that will stay with you as your needs develop.

That's a great question — and one that's often left unanswered. First of all, sharpening and honing are two different activities. Before a blade becomes actually dull, first it loses its true. In this stage, the very edge of the knife actually becomes malleable and curls over slightly, hurting the knife's overall performance. When this happens, as it does to all knives during regular use, the correct solution is to use a honing rod.
Sharpening on water stones is traditional, it carries with it a sense of pride. For me, I think of the men that I would like to talk the most in my life, those Master Sharpeners in Japan, those gentle and kind men that have dedicated their lives to sharpening knives, it goes back in history, it is a very special feeling being part of this. THIS is what drives me the most, yes the sharp knives are awesome but doing this with my bare hands, doing something my dad and his dad did, using a skill that I have spent years and years improving is a privilege. Coming from a person who sharpens knives every day for people, if I could only choose one method of sharpening knives it would be freehand, there is no question about that.

Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand.
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