Method 3: Use a Sharpening Stone. This is the best method by far. Not only will it give you the best edge, it also removes the least amount of material. With a fine enough grit, your knife should be able to take hairs off your arm when you've finished. Additionally—and I'm not kidding about the importance of this one—the act of sharpening your knife will help you create a much stronger bond with your blade, and a knife that is treated respectfully will behave much better for its owner. The only problem? It takes a little know-how.
Ease of Use – Are you willing to take the time to learn to properly sharpen your knife? When looking for a sharpener, you should remember that some of these products are capable of operating for you, while others require a little bit more effort. If you’re not willing to put in the effort, you should rely on devices that are effortless, such as electric and pull-through models. Knife sharpening systems are fairly easy to use, as well!
Aesthetics – While it’s true that most people keep their sharpener, (even their expensive mechanical sharpeners) in the drawer until it’s time to use them you’ll still want to be aware of whether your sharpener fits into the overall aesthetic of your kitchen when you do take it out to use. While sharpener designs are fairly limited to be sure you typically have some control over the color and finish of the device as well as design factors like whether the device is boxy or rounded in appearance. With a stone sharpener or a stick however you pretty much get what you get.
Honing steels are another story altogether. Honing steels are those instruments that look light a saber (light or otherwise) which you use to gussy up the edge of the blade periodically before using it. These do wear out every few years or less, depending on how often you use them. If you are unsure whether your honing steel is worn out run your finger around it. If it feels smooth all the way around then it’s time for a replacement. Not to worry though, they’re really affordable. One thing you may want to keep in mind about honing steels is that they typically won’t do much to hone the edge of some super hard knives, such as Japanese Global brand knives.
We spent 44 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. If you're starting to end up with puree instead of nicely sliced tomatoes every time you get them on your cutting board, it might be time to sharpen your blades. Our selection of knife sharpeners will give you the edge to get chopping and slicing with precision again in no time, whether you're a home cook or a restaurant chef. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best knife sharpener on Amazon.
I spent a few years trying out different sharpening systems from Grandpa’s old Arkansas Stones to a Lansky system but none of them really clicked with me and did not seem very intuitive, repeatable or all that accurate. Those few characteristics are important as each time you sharpen your knife it removes metal from the edge and thus eats into the overall service life of your valuable and often-times costly tool. Therefore it’s important that your sharpening is accurate and repeatable, removing as little material as physically possible to prolong the service life of your knife.
Everten is Australia's leading online kitchenware retailer. A passionate Australian family business, we pride ourselves on having the best range available, stocking over 10000 products from the world's leading brands matched with the best service. As the very first online kitchenware retailer to become a Google Trusted Store in Australia, you know that you can trust us to deliver quality kitchenware at unbeatable prices with full product warranties to your door for just a flat rate of $8.90 anywhere in Australia. Read more about us
Be sure to note what kind of edge the ProntoPro 4643 puts on a knife. Chef’sChoice describes it as having “a lot of bite.” That’s accurate. It’s also a nice way of saying that the edge doesn’t end up polished to a fine point but comes out rather “toothy,” or microscopically serrated. This result isn’t a bad thing at all; it’s the sort of edge that most traditional European knives, including those of the highest quality, came with. Toothy edges perform sensationally if you are doing push- or pull-cuts—the sort where you move the knife tip away or toward you as you slice, and the sort most people do. Just be aware that, if you are used to chop-cutting (pushing the blade straight down through a food item), you may have a hard time if you sharpen with the ProntoPro 4643.
Be sure to note what kind of edge the ProntoPro 4643 puts on a knife. Chef’sChoice describes it as having “a lot of bite.” That’s accurate. It’s also a nice way of saying that the edge doesn’t end up polished to a fine point but comes out rather “toothy,” or microscopically serrated. This result isn’t a bad thing at all; it’s the sort of edge that most traditional European knives, including those of the highest quality, came with. Toothy edges perform sensationally if you are doing push- or pull-cuts—the sort where you move the knife tip away or toward you as you slice, and the sort most people do. Just be aware that, if you are used to chop-cutting (pushing the blade straight down through a food item), you may have a hard time if you sharpen with the ProntoPro 4643.

Functionality – If you have experience with the stick or sharpening stone you likely don’t want or need anything else. If, however, you are in search of an electric-powered sharpener you’ll want to consider how many “stages” you need in your sharpener. In a typical 3-stage sharpener the first stage is the coarsest and does most of the heavy lifting required to turn the edge from dull to sharp. The second stage will have finer grain sharpening wheels. These are used to hone the edge, that is, to smooth out the burrs left by the coarse first stage. A third stage will refine the edge even further and remove any debris left over from the sharpening process.
Only 2 pairs of pulls are needed on Stage 3 to create a sharp edge that can tackle the majority of your food preparation needs. If you’re looking for a few extra fancy points with gourmet preparation, then give the blade a couple more pulls on Stage 3. Go ahead, pluck that hair and with dramatic flourish, slice it in midair, that’s how sharp your knife is now!
Best knife sharpening system is what this article is going to provide you with. Today’s knife sharpening has been influenced by the development of knife sharpening system. The revolutionary development of knife sharpening system has been greatly improved through time. The great success of the knife sharpening system’s development is contributed by the mixture of

The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO performs double duty as a knife sharpener and a tool sharpener. Its ability to perform multiple tasks is part of why this sharpener looks so intimidating. Instead of using spinning discs like most electric sharpeners, this Work Sharp uses belts. In fact, it works a lot like a typical electric sander. A motor pulls the belts along so that they gently shave away at whatever you place them against.
The Idahone stood out on a couple of fine details, too: Its ergonomic maple wood handle was more comfortable than the synthetic handles on the rest of the competitors, and its hanging ring is amply sized and sturdily made of steel. The other ceramic rods we tested had smaller hanging rings, plastic rings, or no hanging ring at all. Hanging a ceramic rod is a good idea, because the material is somewhat brittle and can chip or break if it gets jostled around in a drawer or utensil holder.
For instance, American Novaculite (aka Washita and Arkansas Stones) is a form of metamorphic Chert that produces some of the best known and best loved natural whetstones in existence. Then, there is a form of Belgian Coticule which has been known for providing extra-keen edges since Roman times and, there is a Japanese Siliciclastic sedimentary stone (aka Japanese Water Stones) which consist of a fine silicate particles suspended in a clay matrix. Plus, there are also various types of man-made whetstones available such as Silicon Carbide (aka Crystalon) stones and Aluminum Oxide (aka India Stones) as well as a synthetic Corundum (aka Ruby) rod and Aluminum Oxide impregnated ceramic rods as well as several different types of diamond hones.

So, why are there four slots? Unlike many other electric and manual sharpeners which sharpen both sides of the blade at one time, this sharpener sharpens one side at a time. Therefore, two slots are for the rough grit and two slots are for the fine grit. This is especially helpful for those people who prefer to only sharpen one side of certain blades.


Warranty – It is absolutely vital to make sure that the manufacturer offers a good warranty! Although this might not matter so much with the others, it does for the electric knife sharpener! The internal motor and other components, which move about, can wear out. Since more things can go wrong here, you will want to make sure that the manufacturer backs up their product with a lengthy warranty.
“Wow!!!! I am completely blown away. Just got this device this afternoon. And it works incredibly well. Sharpened all of my knives in less than 15 minutes. The blades are razor-sharp. The suction cup holds perfectly and is very stable. I have an electric professional sharpener with two honing blades, and this mighty midget outperforms it hands down. The only concern I have is for durability and longevity. It is mostly plastic, except the blades for sharpening and the rubber suction cup. This could limit its overall life span. What the heck — for the price, you could easily buy another one, or two. I love it!”

The KitchenIQ 50009 is a manual knife sharpener, which means you don’t need to plug it in an electrical socket. They tend to be smaller, and they’re also more affordable. But they can give you extremely sharp beveled edges. For many traditionalists, only the best manual knife sharpener will suffice. And because it doesn’t need electricity and it’s small, you can also ring it with you when you’re outdoors camping, hiking, or hunting.
The manual Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener was the most distinctive tool in our test. Unlike the rest of the models we tried, it employs the V-notch system in which you “carve” a new edge on sharpened tungsten-carbide stones. As noted above, typically you can find such systems in cheap one-step sharpeners that have a deserved reputation for removing too much metal from blades and producing wavy edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. And going into our test, we were skeptical. However, thanks to clever and precise engineering, the Brød & Taylor model produced an excellent edge. It allowed us to hone and polish that edge simply by changing the angle of the blade, producing a sharp, even, stable, and durable edge that nearly matched that from our upgrade pick, the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO performs double duty as a knife sharpener and a tool sharpener. Its ability to perform multiple tasks is part of why this sharpener looks so intimidating. Instead of using spinning discs like most electric sharpeners, this Work Sharp uses belts. In fact, it works a lot like a typical electric sander. A motor pulls the belts along so that they gently shave away at whatever you place them against.

This 600/1,000 grit is my second Unimi knife sharpener, the first is 2,000/6,000 grit and I love them both. Both stones together produce very sharp and well polished knives that reduce the cutting effort and save time in the kitchen. I particularly appreciate that the manufacture printed the grit number on the side of each stone - that helps use the different grits in the proper sequence from the coarser to the finer. The stone comes with a non-slip silicone/rubber base which is very handy.


These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
×