The iconic Wiltshire Stay Sharp Knives have been in homes since 1938, and are known and  trusted for their self-sharpening mechanism, as well as providing good quality durable knives. The Wiltshire Mulit-Purpose knife is ideal for slicing and spreading. The wavy serrations on the blade slice bread & tomatoes without tearing with its high quality stainless steel blade. Scabbard sharpens and hones the knife each time the knife is removed, while the triple rivet handle provides strength and durability. The coloured trim is perfect for quick identification in the drawer. The locking system ensures the knife is securely held in place, and has a safety lock button to release the knife.

If you are a hunting sportsman or an outdoor enthusiast, you definitely know how important your  pocket or hunting knife is to you because you use it for so many different tasks. This is why you will need the best knife sharpener for your pocket knives. The first decision that you will need to make is which type of sharpener you will need and this will be based on the type of knife that needs sharpening. The buck knife should never be sharpened with a power-driven grinding wheel, because it could damage or burn the blade’s temper. If this damage occurs, the edge will become very brittle and increase risks of chips and cracks.
I highly recommend this to anyone who uses a knife. I am a cook, I have many people I work with now purchasing these after they have used mine and I also bought one for my step-dad and he loves it. Well worth the price, I use these on my knives at home and for work. Please read the directions and use accurately as a co-worker injured himself by not following correct procedure, remember, these are knives and are very sharp, you are sharpening them! Common sense people. Remember also to use a steel and hone your knives, please research if you do not know the difference between sharpening and honing.
It sounds pretty simple and if precision equals sharpness then logically thinking, a guided system would reign supreme, every time. If only it were that simple, there is a lot more to this than you may think, arriving at an answer to this question, deserves much consideration of all the collateral elements we become exposed to as we sharpen knives.
If you have both western and Japanese style knives, it’s important to know that electric knife sharpeners such as the Chef's Choice 1520 Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener are able to adjust between the fifteen-degree edge for Japanese style knives and the twenty-degree edge for western style knives at the flip of a switch. This can save you money and counter space.
If you are looking for a knife sharpener that is easy to use, reliable, affordable and compact, then you should consider this one. This amazing knife sharpener, comes with all the attributes, features and qualities needed to sharpen every knife, regardless of how dull it is. It is designed to sharpen and maintain all types of kitchen knives. It is made of carbide and ceramic, which gives a fine grip on various surfaces. It performs exemplary on straight edge blades. It is easy and comfortable to use.
The ceramic stones really bring an edge out and set the stage for the leather strops. The 1200 / 1600 stones are the ones that do the most in my opinion as they refine the edge and allow it to take a nice mirror once the leather strops are applied. I use the super fine 1.4 / .6 micron ceramics to really polish and remove scratches from the diamond stones. The only downside is they are the most expensive stones at about $120 so unless you are very serious about a mirror edge you can skip these.
Remember, we humans are pretty nifty sometimes. I found that my muscle memory was providing me with the opportunity to create edges that really forced me to compare with the edges off of the Edge Pro. It came to me that the Edge Pro had made me a better freehand sharpener, My confidence level had been boosted and with knives to sharpen daily, I was getting more comfortable with sharpening freehand every day, I was improving. That was about four years ago, what about today.
Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.
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