Give Yourself Peace of Mind – When attempting to purchase a knife sharpener, it is vital to do so with an endless amount of confidence. In order to do this, it is a good idea to read a massive amount of knife sharpener reviews. By reading this information, you will undoubtedly find tons of helpful details that will pertain specifically to your purchase. Without this information, you will be purchasing blindly and could potentially regret it!
Stone is awesome, stand and rubber holder are awesome. Sharpened my Benchmade griptilian with a 154CM (58-61HRC) stainless steel blade to easily shaving hair in about 10 minutes or less, on the 4000 side. Can probably get it sharper, too. Completely worth the money, and very easy to use after a few minutes of reading - don't waste any money on pre-built sharpeners - they suck.
Overall, these systems are highly innovative, effective and can sharpen or hone your blade to perfection. Are they a little more expensive? Yes, but serious knife enthusiasts will find that the extra cost is ultimately worth it for the increased benefits. This doesn’t mean that this type of system will be the right knife sharpener for you though. Instead, you’ll need to know exactly how and how often you will be using the sharpener, before you make your decision.

The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.


You've likely seen someone using a honing rod to "sharpen" a knife. But the steel rod doesn't actually sharpen your knife—it just straightens out the cutting edge on the blade to allow for smoother, safer cuts. Sharpening your knife, on the other hand, actually, well, sharpens it. So yes, you need to do both. Hone your knife weekly—every time you use your knife, if you'd like—and sharpen your knife every few months, or at least every year (depending on how often you use it, and how soon you notice dulling that honing doesn't really improve).

Grits – When purchasing one of these items, you will also need to take the time to select a grit rating. This is very similar to sand paper and will determine the exact type of edge that you’re able to achieve. A finer grit will be able to provide you with a smoother finished edge. Some manufacturers of these products do not openly display the grit of their steels, so you will need to look very closely!
A honing rod (also known as a honing steel, knife steel, or sharpening steel) is also highly recommended. These are not sharpeners, although they are often thought of that way. Rather, a honing rod helps keep a blade’s edge keen between sharpenings by straightening out the tiny dings and dents caused by everyday slicing and chopping. Honing is a simple and fast process—it takes just a few seconds—and it can extend the life of a sharp edge for weeks or even months. Eventually, however, the edge gets rounded over and dull; then it’s time for a complete resharpening.
In addition, the most prized of the natural Japanese Water Stones are quarried in the Narutaki District north of Kyoto, Japan and are commonly available as either bench stones or pocket stones in grits ranging from 120 to 12,000. On the other hand, synthetic water stones are made from Aluminum Oxide and commonly available as either bench stones or pocket stones as well in grits ranging from 220 to 8,000 and, although this is the same abrasive material used to make India Oil Stones, the difference between the two is that the binder that holds the abrasive together enables Water Stones to be much softer than India Oil Stones which, in turn, promotes faster cutting because the worn abrasive material breaks away more quickly and is replaced with fresh, sharp, abrasive material more quickly. In addition, because water stones do not become glazed or loaded with swarf like oil stones can, new abrasive particles are constantly exposed as the stone wears so it continues to cut consistently. Plus, they can be lubricated effectively with water (rather than oil which can ruin some water stones) which combines with the fine particles of abrasive from the surface of the stone to form a slurry which polishes the bevel as the stone cuts. However, it should also be noted that Water Stones do become uneven significantly faster than other types of whetstones although, their softness does make them easier to true again.
Though "whetstone" is often mistaken as a reference to the water sometimes used to lubricate such stones, the term is based on the word "whet", which means to sharpen a blade,[1][2] not on the word "wet". The verb nowadays usually used to describe the process of using a sharpening stone is to sharpen, but the older term to whet is still sometimes used. The term to stone is so rare in this sense that it is no longer mentioned in for example the Oxford Living Dictionaries.[3][4] One of the most common mistaken idioms in English involves the phrase "to whet your appetite", too often mistakenly written as "to wet". But to "whet" quite appropriately means "to sharpen" one's appetite, not to douse it with water.
Only 2 pairs of pulls are needed on Stage 3 to create a sharp edge that can tackle the majority of your food preparation needs. If you’re looking for a few extra fancy points with gourmet preparation, then give the blade a couple more pulls on Stage 3. Go ahead, pluck that hair and with dramatic flourish, slice it in midair, that’s how sharp your knife is now!
In terms of feedback, in the eyes, and in the hands of many sharpeners, the feedback on this particular brand of stones is not to their liking and often it is enough to stop them from using them. These are thinner than other stones as well so you may get the impression that you are not getting your moneys worth. They are very hard stones, there is no soft, creamy sensation as you sharpen, there is not much feedback at all in fact.
So, why are there four slots? Unlike many other electric and manual sharpeners which sharpen both sides of the blade at one time, this sharpener sharpens one side at a time. Therefore, two slots are for the rough grit and two slots are for the fine grit. This is especially helpful for those people who prefer to only sharpen one side of certain blades.
Making sense of every available model (there are scores on the market) and explaining all the technicalities about each one would require volumes. But introducing you to many of the types of sharpeners so you know what your options are—well, that much this article can do. From there, you can ask yourself some questions: How much time are you willing to invest in learning to use the tool? And how much time are you willing to spend sharpening? How much money can you spend? Then you can shop around, talk to experts at cutlery or kitchenwares shops, and ultimately find a specific model you like.
I do have to question the grit ratings of these stones. I didn't notice anything before using them, but after a day, the 2000 grit actually felt courser than the 1000 grit side of the other stone. Whether that could be a byproduct of other factors or an indication of the more obvious, being that the grit ratings aren't accurate, I don't know. But that seemed to be the main criticism of cheaper whetstones, that their grit ratings often aren't accurate. Or maybe it's less a problem with accuracy and more a difference that most synthetic stones might have in common when being compared to much pricier natural stones?
Cutting angle – With a manual stick or sharpening stone you set the angle yourself so this does not factor into the equation when choosing that type of sharpener. When shopping for an electric sharpener however it does. You’ll want to decide if you want your knives to have the 15 degree “Asian” style angle so that you can make precise cuts or the Western standard 20 degrees or 22-degree sharpening angle. Most people will opt for the 20 or 22-degree angle simply because their cuisine doesn’t call for a lot of finesse from their knives and those knives are probably of a heavier Western variety anyway.
Newer knife sharpeners have been designed with you in mind. They are quick and easy to use. They figure out the angle for you, so you can focus on learning skills in other areas of your life without wasting time learning how to hold a knife. This page has been designed to bring you the best of the best of today’s most popular kitchen knife sharpeners. Of course, some of the older style sharpeners have prevailed in popularity over the years and we will be sure to include a couple of those here as well.
Prior to using any kind of sharpening stone, it is advised that individuals soak the sharpening stone in light machine oil or household oil for at least 12 hours before being used. Before being used, it is advisable to wipe the surface of the sharpening stone to get rid of grime, grit or dirt that may have accumulated overtime during the time of storage.
It didn’t take me long to figure out that ‘factory sharp’ is not sharp at all, generally a manufacturer will use a 240 or a 400 grit belt to put an edge on a knife. This process often times leaves small burrs on the edges and I have received many knives with less than impressive edges over the years. Of course, once you start using your new knife it will eventually dull even if you did buy the latest and greatest super steel such as M390, CTS-204P or ZDP-189. So you will always be faced with the issue of how to bring your beloved pocket knife back to its original sharpness or preferably even better.
I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.
A whetstone is the primarily tool used for sharpening the blade. Most are synthetic and include particles in the stone to determine grit size. A larger grit will make for a rough grind, while a finer grit makes it smoother. Most stones will have two sides to facilitate a rough and a fine grind. An oil stone and a grindstone are similar variations of the whetstone. Diamond, of course, is a girl's best friend and a knife owner's dream. Considering it is the hardest known substance to man, it can sharpen anything and it's used for knives as well.

At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 

The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.


In most cases a sharpening stone will be a combination of sharpening grains and a binding agent. However, in case of a Ardennes Coticule it is a completely natural product. The grains have cutting edges which enables them to sharpen your knife. As soon as a sharpening stone is used little pieces of the grains break off, revealing a new cut ing edge. The higher the number, the finer the grain. Stones with coarse grains (up to grain 400) can be used to shape the blade of a blunt knife. You can subsequently take care of the fine finish with a stone with a smaller grain.
I bought this originally so I could tear it apart and review that it was nothing but a fanboy product. I got so tired of hearing how great it was from all the tacti-morons. Well, I'm eating those words, because it actually IS great. Learning curve is very small, and when you use the right belts for the right blade, and realize to let it do the work without forcing it to, it works very, very well. It puts an edge on a dull knife from 420C to D2, S30V and CPM154. It polishes that edge. It hones it. I strop it anyway, and it makes short work of sharpening. I love using stones, but I do that for a hobby mostly. If I want a fast and sharp edge, I have this thing ready to go now. You don't need the more expensive Ken Onion edition unless you have knives that fall out of the general category, the regular workshop will do fine. I've done outdoor knives up to and including a BK2 and small as a pocket folder. If you get the diamond belts, you can do ceramic knives as well and remove chips or hone the edges perfectly. Takes no skill to operate, but that's assuming general intelligence and the ability to read instructions.
A manual pull-through sharpener looks similar to the electric machine, except that it has no motor. You sharpen your knives by placing them into the slots and pulling through with force. These manual sharpeners obviously cost less money, and inevitably more time and labor than the electric counterparts. However, they can still bring very satisfying results.
A: When it comes to the best knife sharpeners used in a domestic setting the abrasives used to sharpen the blade should last for quite a few years. When they do eventually wear out many of the best manufacturers will refurbish them for you, typically for a nominal fee. Again, however, unless you are using the sharpener on a daily basis (and there is virtually no reason the average person would do this), the sharpener should last for many years before ever needing service.
What does this mean? Well, you are the only individual, who can determine the best knife sharpener for your own needs. Before attempting to choose, it is vital to know exactly how and how frequently you will be using this tool. Other specific parameters should also be taken into account. Below, you will find information that can help you form a solid foundation.
Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.

With this toolkit, setting an exact sharpening angle at which to guide the blade works great, according to Let's Talk Survival's review. The kit ships with five water stones, ranging from 120 to 1,000 grit, allowing for coarse to fine sharpening. It also contains 2,000 and 3,000 grit polish tapes for honing. The stones fit tightly into the kit's design, ensuring no slippage as you use the kit's angle guide to draw the knife blade across the stones.
As noted previously, this automatic knife sharpener uses precision angle sharpening guides, which makes sure you obtain the proper angle with every use. It comes with two guides, which are the 50° guide and the 40° guide. The 40° guide is mainly used for thinner blades as well as kitchen knives. On the other hand, the 50° guide is used for outdoor and hunting knives.
At age 10, Terada learned the basics of sushi from his father and then went on to attend RKC Chef's School in Kochi, Japan from 1987-1989. He soon earned a nickname for his fast knife, attention to detail, divine presentation and ability to create new dishes and accents based on traditional Japanese cuisine. After graduating RKC Chef School, he was called to serve under Master Chef Kondo at Yuzuan restaurant in Kochi, Japan from 1989-1992. Mr. Kondo is the master of Kansai style cooking, considered to be the high-end of Japanese cuisine. Terada earned the title Master Sushi Chef by becoming the standing head sushi chef & can serve Fugu (Japan Licensed) to the public.
In fact, I got this exclusively for family members who do not know or care about sharpening. When I must cook at my in-law’s house for holiday dinners, I bring this instead of my precious chef’s knives. In a few minutes, I can sharpen several of their criminally mistreated kitchen knives without fuss or mess. That makes me seem like a double hero. (both chef and sharpener)
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