But if the edge it produces isn’t the absolute best (that honor goes to the Trizor XV), why consider the Brød & Taylor? Two reasons. First, its footprint is small enough—4½ by 3½ inches in breadth and depth, and 6½ inches high—that you can keep it on the counter, meaning you’ll be more likely to hone your knives every time you use them, a good practice that too few people are disciplined enough to follow since it generally means pulling a knife steel out of a drawer or knife block. Second, this sharpener is so elegant to look at and so simple to employ that it almost encourages you to use it. Whether you respond accordingly is a matter of personal taste and dedication, of course, but knowing our readers, I’m sure at least a few value such things highly.
Stropping only requires an extra minute or less. It’s worth it! You get all the advantages of this fast and foolproof carbide scraper, PLUS the refined polished edge that not only lasts longer, but keeps metal out of your food. Pliant leather automatically produces a micro-bevel or rather a “micro curved bevel.” THAT is what makes your edges long lasting AND super sharp.
Ye olde tomato test - After you have sharpened using one of the above sharpeners grab a firm tomato and try to slice it. If the blade is properly sharpened it will slice through the skin with virtually no effort and without pushing the skin inward first. If the skin is able to fight back against the blade then your knives are not properly sharpened yet.
That’s a pity, because the merits of a sharp knife become apparent the moment you swipe through an onion with one. It’s pure pleasure. A sharp knife cuts easily and precisely, requiring little more pressure than the knife’s own weight to do the job.  By the end of this project, I was used to working with truly sharp knives. From now on, that’s how I’ll be keeping mine, and I hope to help you put aside your qualms and make knife sharpening part of your routine, too. Of course, that means you’ll need a knife sharpener—the question is, which one?
The Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener is distinctly different from our main picks, not just in its obviously unique form but also in the way it sharpens. Whereas the others grind a new edge with rotating wheels, the Brød & Taylor model carves one with stationary tungsten-carbide stones. Some of the cheapest and worst sharpeners employ a similar method, but the Brød & Taylor’s clever design and precise construction allow it to deviate from the norm. After quickly carving an impressively keen, even edge on a dull knife, with a simple tilt of the blade you can then hone and polish the edge on those same tungsten-carbide stones, obtaining a durably sharp knife. And because this sharpener is compact and handsome, it can live on your countertop, so you’ll be more likely to keep up with regular knife maintenance. It’s the clear choice for style hounds.
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This sharpener includes five different sharpening stones along with a knife clamp that holds the knife during sharpening, and a guide that allows you to select the proper blade angle. Honing oil is also included. The stones have finger grips for a secure hold and are color coded so you know which are coarser and which are finer. Unlike traditional whetstones, with this system the knife remains still while you move the stones along the blade. This manual system allows you to sharpen knives at four different angles, but requires some practice to become comfortable with the technique.


Using a dull knife for such a long time, I had developed a habit of putting a great deal of pressure on my knives when slicing root vegetables like carrots or turnips. I would hold the vegetable in my left hand and press firmly against it with the knife in my right. Sometimes I rested the heel of my left hand on the part of the blade near the tip while drawing the knife down with my right so that I could put even more pressure on the blade.
Lots of knife enthusiasts swear by a traditional steel for sharpening – but in actual fact this metal rod ‘hones’ a knife, which is essentially realigning the blade and not, strictly speaking, sharpening it. This knife skills video shows you how to use a steel. Whetstones usually come as a flat block of stone, and while they’re very efficient, require a certain amount of skill to use them properly. Hand-held sharpeners are usually small, compact and the best choice for home cooks or beginners – they often come with a safety guard and the wheel action is very intuitive to use. For that reason, we tested handheld sharpeners only. 
If you’re a dedicated home chef, or if you simply demand the best possible edge that doesn’t involve messing with stones or jigs, we recommend the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV Sharpener. Cook’s Illustrated also names this professional-grade electric model as the top pick in the category, and I’ve used a similar model, the 1520, to great satisfaction on my heavy Wüsthof chef’s knife and cheap paring knives for six or seven years now. (The fact is, Chef’sChoice dominates the high-quality sharpener market.)
One of the combinations of stones that I was introduced to several years ago is a unique one, it is a 500, 2,000 and 16,000 grit combination. I was apprehensive when I first tried this, that was thousands of knives ago, it works, it is fantastic combination. It is unique because the traditional way of thinking is that we should be doubling the grit sizes as we sharpen, for example, a 500 grit stone should be followed by a 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit. This line of thought is meant to be flexible, it is a general rule only, I have broken it countless times.

Some models can sharpen serrated knives but the economic models usually will not so be sure you check the manufacturers' documentation. Generally, you can touch up your serrated knives with great success by using to last or finest stage of an electric sharpener. To really sharpen each serration then you normally need around tapered sharpening rod, or you need a manual sharpening kit (like the Gatco 10005 or 10006).

For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)


Knife sharpeners work by stripping away metal to form new bevels, ideally at an angle that closely matches the original. But you don’t need to obsess over getting the angle exactly right. For most kitchen knives, consistency trumps precision, says David Marks, a professional knife sharpener and owner of Stoddard’s, a Boston cutlery store and sharpening service: “As long as you keep the same angle throughout the process, it doesn’t matter if you’re off by a couple of degrees from the original angle.” Since consistency is key, many knife sharpeners incorporate some means of setting the angle for you.
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