I haven't been able to find a decent, low priced knife sharpener since I bought my Wusthof knives. Until now! I decided that this was the last low price sharpening alternative I would try. I mean, for around $13, if it didn't work, I wouldn't be out that much. Man this thing is awesome! Seriously, it's easy to use and really tiny so it's not taking up any room. Most importantly though, it really sharpened my knives right up and took no time at all. I read some reviews where they talked about the metal shavings. It seemed to pull a lot of shavings off the first time I used it, but the 2nd time it was a lot less. I haven't tried on my serrated knives yet but I trust it will work fine. Even sharpened my steak knives with it. I also really like the fact that before it was delivered, the manufacturer reached out to me with a small instruction manual and then followed up with me after I received the product. Bonus: this is a small company so they are working hard for happy customers and I love supporting the little guy! Tips:
The ProntoPro 4643 easily took a top-quality Mac paring knife made of very hard forged Japanese steel from badly dulled to paper-slicing sharp. Initially the knife struggled to slice through the paper and ultimately tore out; after sharpening, it swept through like a razor. And the ProntoPro 4643 was able to sharpen the blade to within ⅜ inch from the handle—that’s excellent compared with many competitors. For each knife, the whole process took about 60 seconds, and the padded handle and level base offered a secure, stable, confidence-inspiring grip.
I would say they are worth the money. Go for it. I took a blunted Pampered Chef kitchen knife from completely dull to razor sharp in about an hour (of bumbling and repairing mistakes LOL) heavy grinding. If you have a severely damaged blade, grab one of those cheesey two sided stones from Harbor Freight to do your heavy grinding. From there these stones will work very well.
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.
Users say they love how the Work Sharp Ken Onion Edition Knife and Tool Sharpener -- essentially a miniature belt grinder -- gives them a blend of old school sharpening technique and convenience features like a variable-speed trigger control and blade guides. Switching between the 3/4-inch abrasive belts is quick and easy, with no special tools required, and the roughest belt is tough enough to sharpen serious tools like lawnmower blades.
This package includes a bamboo base to hold the stone, a premium quality whetstone (#1000 / #6000), a simple instruction manual, a knife sharpening angle guide and a detailed eBook that will help the beginners to learn the basic and advanced tips about effective knife sharpening.This special stone has versatile uses. You can use it to sharp scissors, kitchen knives, hunting knives and pocket knives too.
The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
The synthetic stone is constructed out of aluminum oxide, which is a very abrasive material, but very soft. The main difference between the India and synthetic water stone is the binder that securely holds the abrasive material together. This stone will definitely offer an extremely quick cut. The way this works is the old abrasive material will break away and then will be replaced by a fresh sharp material.

I bought this and Unimi's 600/1000 whetstone at the same time. Curiously, reviews are currently blocked for their 600/1000 model, as amazon wouldn't let me leave one for it. Considering the conspicuous absence of reviews in the other stone's listing, one can only assume they're being censored for everyone. So, maybe I should be more critical of these stones, and use them a while longer before giving them any praise? But I've had a very positive experience with them so far, and the 600/1000 stone was the one I found most useful.


The angle at which you position the knife during sharpening is key, and it depends on what sort of knife you have. European/Western knives typically have a blade angle of 20 degrees, while Asian knives typically have a blade angle of 15 degrees, although many European knife makers have started introducing 15-degree blades as well. Most electric sharpeners have guides to help you maintain the blade at the correct angle, and some can accommodate multiple blade angles.
A shinkansen is a Japanese-style pull-through sharpener named after the famous bullet train. It features two sets of ceramic wheels set at the right angle for sharpening a Japanese blade, which takes out the guesswork of the waterstone. Simply hold the handle with your left hand, then saw back and forth gently through the coarser wheel to sharpen, before switching to the finer wheel to polish.

This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.

Sharpness Coarse sharpening on the Vulkanis is done with the knife pointing down and the fine sharpening with the knife point up. If you use it correctly it will put a good edge on your knife. However, when using the knife you will find its blunts quicker than when it's sharpened with, for example, the Minosharp. The cause of this can be seen in the picture of the edge; you can still see little burrs on the edge. 
Electric sharpeners use rotating ceramic or abrasive-impregnated metal wheels to grind a new edge into a blade. Low-end models, which start at about $25, feature a single set of coarse wheels that produce a rough, if potentially serviceable, edge—it depends on how even the edge is, and that’s a matter of overall design and engineering. Higher-end models can cost $200 or more (and professional models for slaughterhouses can approach $1,000), but they feature stronger motors and multiple grinding wheels—coarse, fine, and often polishing/honing—that when well-engineered can put an extremely keen, durable edge on knives of every style and quality.

Most culinary professionals will agree: few tools get as much use in the kitchen as the iconic chef's knife. These medium-to-large-sized beauties are often flashy and usually razor-sharp. Most kitchen workers and home cooks swear by them as their most treasured piece of equipment. And when something is that important to your food and your career, keeping it in great condition is of utmost importance.
Shapton Glass 320, 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 16,000. I have the 4,000, and 8,000, they are absolutely fine, great in fact but I just don’t use them as much as the others. These stones excel on knives made of hard steel, the hardest steel is no match for these. This does not mean you can’t sharpen hard knives on the Naniwa brand of course, you can. I have been using this particular brand of stone for many years and I absolutely love them.
The speed and polishing ability of waterstones attract many sharpeners. Waterstones sharpen quickly and are available in fine polishing grits not found in other stone types. The ability to flatten the stones is a necessity when sharpening with waterstones, so a starting set should include a flattening stone of some kind. Our article, How to Flatten a Waterstone, has more information about keeping waterstones flat.
Its main disadvantage is cost: At about $120, the flagship stainless steel Professional model sits in an uncomfortable middle ground between our main pick and our upgrade pick. That said, an otherwise identical Classic model made of black plastic is generally closer to the price of our main pick. A lesser point, but an important one, is that this design is not completely foolproof, as our other picks are. You have to pay attention and use a steady hand and pressure to get a straight edge. Not hard—but you may need a little practice to master the process.
It's simple to see how a dull knife is more dangerous than one that is honed daily. It takes more power to chop with a blunted blade, and inconsistent knife edges easily slip off food and can jerk the knife across or into your hand accidentally. Furthermore, injuries from less-than-perfect knives generally take longer to heal. So, it's of prime importance to keep that blade as keen as possible.
Very quickly, we gravitated toward the ceramic rods, which all performed well on both types of blade; the steel honing rods created tiny chips on the Japanese blades. That’s because steel honing rods are made of exceptionally hard metal covered with fine ridges. These ridges bend softer German knife edges back into alignment, but harder Japanese knife edges have a tendency to break rather than bend. The ceramic rods also provided a very slight stickiness or friction when honing that made it easier to sweep the blades in smooth strokes, as you’re supposed to. Steel hones feel slick—the blade wants to slip instead of glide—and that makes them a bit trickier to master. And for the reasons above, the Idahone rapidly became our favorite among the ceramic rods. We’re also not alone in liking it: It’s extremely well-reviewed on Amazon and is recommended by many specialist knife retailers, including Chef Knives To Go, Epicurean Edge, and Knife Merchant.
Our observations about the types of sharpeners on the following pages are based heavily on our experience using them. Why? Because if a sharpener is a pain to use, then it’s going to stay in the drawer where it will be of minimal benefit to our knives. We tried the sharpeners with a variety of knives—all stainless steel—including paring, slicing, boning, utility, and chef’s knives of various lengths; most were tragically dull when we started. We didn’t try serrated, ceramic, or other specialty knives.
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