Our only gripe about this sharpener is the terminology used in its documentation. When the Spyderco manual refers to a 40-degree knife edge, it's actually referencing what most knife-makers and manufacturers or sharpeners would call a 20-degree blade, the standard for Western kitchen knives. The reason for this disconnect is because Spyderco is measuring all the way across the blade, while most others measure just one side of the blade at a time. What Spyderco calls a 30-degree blade would typically be called a 15-degree blade, the standard for Asian kitchen knives, although some Western manufacturers are beginning to use this narrower blade angle as well.
We have been helping customers find the right sharpeners for more than a decade. Selecting a sharpener can be difficult if you're not sure what you need. Our staff is trained to listen to your needs and to help you find the right sharpener the first time. We understand that it may be your first time sharpening, so we're available to help you if you have questions. Even if you're already a sharpening professional, our staff is available to answer your tough questions. We use what we sell, so you can be assured that when you purchase from us, we're able to help you with your sharpener.
When we wonder how sharp their swords were, we need to consider how they used them. They thrusted, that is, jabbed the point into an enemy, they cut, or chopped, and they sliced. Slicing cannot be done with a dull blade, as I discovered in my own kitchen. Knights, therefore, had to have a method of honing their blades at least as good as that with which our own kitchen knives are sharpened.
A blade's sharpness may be tested by checking if it "bites"—begins to cut by being drawn across an object without pressure. Specialized sticks exist to check bite, though one can also use a soft ballpoint pen, such as the common white Bic Stic. A thumbnail may be used[3] at the risk of a cut, or the edge of a sheet of paper. For kitchen knives, various vegetables may be used to check bite, notably carrots, tomatoes, or cucumbers. In testing in this way, any nicks are felt as obstacles.
You can even determine just how sharp your knife can be when you have your own knife sharpener. For a chopping blade, you may want to have a 45-degree angle on each side so you have enough mass to use for chopping. A fine slicing knife may have a 15-degree angle instead so it can slice through food with ease. You can also limit the sharpness for such food ingredients as very ripe tomatoes.
Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.
Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Rod Sharpener makes it easy to sharpen all kinds of knives including those with serrations gut hooks fishhooks and pointed tools. Industrial monocrystalline diamond is electroplated in nickel onto a steel base. Sharpen dry. No messy oil needed. Fine 600 grit (25 ...  More + Product Details Close
Three other positives to the Brød & Taylor: First, you can use it to sharpen serrated blades by tilting the blade in the horizontal plane so that only one carbide (generally the one on the right, given how the edges of most serrated blades are ground) contacts the metal. Second, it’s ambidextrous, because lefties simply have to turn it around to engage their dominant hand. And third, unique among our test models, it can sharpen blades all the way to the heel, because the left- and right-hand carbides meet at a single point. (The ⅜ inch of the blade that our Chef’sChoice picks leave unsharpened at the heel is largely ignorable, but praise where praise is due.)
One of the only things we don’t like about the Idahone is the lack of a prominent finger guard where the rod meets the handle. As a result, we highly recommend using the safer “supported” technique for honing a knife, as demonstrated in our guide to chef’s knives. In this method, the rod is held against the counter or cutting board, and blade always moves away from your body and grip-hand, greatly reducing the chance of a nasty accident.
Very quickly, we gravitated toward the ceramic rods, which all performed well on both types of blade; the steel honing rods created tiny chips on the Japanese blades. That’s because steel honing rods are made of exceptionally hard metal covered with fine ridges. These ridges bend softer German knife edges back into alignment, but harder Japanese knife edges have a tendency to break rather than bend. The ceramic rods also provided a very slight stickiness or friction when honing that made it easier to sweep the blades in smooth strokes, as you’re supposed to. Steel hones feel slick—the blade wants to slip instead of glide—and that makes them a bit trickier to master. And for the reasons above, the Idahone rapidly became our favorite among the ceramic rods. We’re also not alone in liking it: It’s extremely well-reviewed on Amazon and is recommended by many specialist knife retailers, including Chef Knives To Go, Epicurean Edge, and Knife Merchant.

The first slot contains carbide blades which effortless shave your blade as you draw it through. The blades feature microscopic carbide particles which help them rough up the edges of the blade as it moves through to get an even deeper shave. The second sharpening slot contains two ceramic rods which work to hone your blade as you draw it through. They gently pull your blade into alignment and buff away the rough edge etched into it in the first stage. You can even choose to skip the first stage and use only the ceramic rods to hone your knife on a regular basis.


The goal when sharpening is to create a burr, which is a tiny whisper of metal left on one side of the blade. You'll know you have a burr when you can feel one smooth and one scratchy side to the edge. Warner's is formed in no time at all; I struggled. Nevertheless, eventually I got there. Once you've got the burr, it's time to move on to step three.
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Wicked Edge is unique as it has a vise in the center to clamp the knife and on either side there are two arms with sharpening guides attached. These arms and guides allow you to precisely control the exact angle you want your knife to be sharpened at. The cool thing about this is once you have set the angles and sharpened the knife it’s 100% repeatable when it comes time to touch up again and very, very accurate.
The Presto EverSharp 08800 electric knife sharpener gets great reviews. In our test, though, its flimsy motor instantly bogged down when our knife contacted its sharpening wheels—and even light pressure threatened to stop the the sharpening wheels entirely. The high, wide guide frames meant it couldn’t sharpen the last ¾ inch of a blade, an unacceptable shortcoming. We’ll take our experience over the reviews.
Instead of making a show of holding the steel in the air and dramatically sliding the knife against it, hold a honing steel vertically, with the tip resting on a work surface and the handle gripped firmly in one hand. Press the bottom of the knife’s blade (the thickest part) against the honing steel and, working at a 15-20 degree angle, pull the knife down and towards you. Follow through to the tip of the blade. Keeping the knife in the same hand, repeat the motion on the other side of the steel, reversing the angle of the blade against the honing steel.
Certain knife sharpeners require you to spend up to 15 minutes of your life, just to get the edge or sharpness that you desire. If you are a busy individual, you may not have all that time in your life, and that is where the SunrisePro Knife Sharpener comes in. It makes the whole process of sharpening a knife easy and fast. It doesn’t matter how dull or damaged your blade is, this machine gets the job done within a few seconds.

Shapton Glass 320, 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 16,000. I have the 4,000, and 8,000, they are absolutely fine, great in fact but I just don’t use them as much as the others. These stones excel on knives made of hard steel, the hardest steel is no match for these. This does not mean you can’t sharpen hard knives on the Naniwa brand of course, you can. I have been using this particular brand of stone for many years and I absolutely love them.
Serrated knives are also sharpened during this final stage. The flexible stropping disks are able to straighten the misaligned teeth of the serrated edge. Each prominent tooth of the serrated edge is sharpened, so that they’re essentially a super-sharp micro-blade all lined up. The 3rd stage abrasive is effective yet gentle, and it can extend the lifespan of your serrated knives regardless of the alloy it uses, or if it is forged or non-forged.
No need to worry about angle or pressure with this style—electric grinders will keep both straight and serrated blades in prime condition with little to no work from you. Not nearly as hands-on as a honing steel, electric sharpeners are noisier and take up more counter space but will keep knives in prime condition with little to no work from you. Safe, fast and user-friendly, they can easily be stored in a kitchen cabinet or under the counter when not in use. Keep in mind that, with proper honing, blades really only need to be sharpened a couple of times per year.
I bought this originally so I could tear it apart and review that it was nothing but a fanboy product. I got so tired of hearing how great it was from all the tacti-morons. Well, I'm eating those words, because it actually IS great. Learning curve is very small, and when you use the right belts for the right blade, and realize to let it do the work without forcing it to, it works very, very well. It puts an edge on a dull knife from 420C to D2, S30V and CPM154. It polishes that edge. It hones it. I strop it anyway, and it makes short work of sharpening. I love using stones, but I do that for a hobby mostly. If I want a fast and sharp edge, I have this thing ready to go now. You don't need the more expensive Ken Onion edition unless you have knives that fall out of the general category, the regular workshop will do fine. I've done outdoor knives up to and including a BK2 and small as a pocket folder. If you get the diamond belts, you can do ceramic knives as well and remove chips or hone the edges perfectly. Takes no skill to operate, but that's assuming general intelligence and the ability to read instructions.
However, what about the patented technology we touched upon at the beginning of this article? Well the Wicked Edge Field and Sport, carries on the tradition of earlier products in the range, with innovations and improvements such as the neoprene padded jaws, (ultimate protection for expensive knives) and the one knob clamping mechanism that makes operating the tool easy enough for anyone.
Using Stage 2 for steeling only engages 1 section of the miniature steel rod. With use, this section can wear down slightly and lessen the effectiveness of your steeling procedure. If you notice this, simply insert a coin or flat-head screwdriver into the slotted cap at the top of the rod, rotate 1 click, and viola! You have a brand new surface of the steel rod ready to go!

Visually, a very sharp knife has an edge that is too small to see with the eye; it may even be hard or impossible to focus in a microscope. The shape near the edge can be highlighted by rotating the knife and watching changes in reflection. Nicks and rolled edges can also be seen, as the rolled edge provides a reflective surface, while a properly straightened edge will be invisible when viewed head-on.
Pull-through machine: A pull-through sharpener, also called a manual sharpener, works best with kitchen knives. You'll pull the knife blade through the sharpener, which includes guide slots with the sharpening agent inside. Some pull-through sharpeners allow you to adjust the angle of the blade, which helps with different types of knives. Some provide multiple guide slots, ranging from coarse to fine sharpening.
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
Budo's sharpening stone is an excellent buy. The 1000 and 4000 grit stone is a good mix for sharpening everyday household knives. The alignment tool also helps a person hold a knife at the proper angle so that they don't inadvertently flatten the edge and dull the blade. The stone has a rubber seat so that it doesn't slide within its bamboo stand. The only negatives are that detailed instructions are not included with the packaging, however, a link is sent to your e-mail address but that doesn't help if it's a gift. Also the tool doesn't work well with short knives like a paring knife. Lastly, the 1000/4000 stone isn't quite suitable for professional level knifeware but Budo does sell higher grit sharpening stones.
Of course, some of the better electric models, such as those from Presto, are very stylish and don’t need to be stowed away. Either way, these sharpeners are lightning fast and get the job completed quicker than the others. If you live a hectic lifestyle and don’t have time with the above sharpeners, the electric knife sharpeners from Chef’sChoice and Wusthof are definitely worth checking out! The easy of use and convenience are simply unparalleled. The only negative to these will ultimately be the increase in price.

The TSPROF K02 was made famous by YouTuber Wranglestar. This incredibly robust, overbuilt sharpener will put a precision edge on your knives and cutlery. This amazing guided system can be fine tuned to achieve the most accurate results you’ve likely ever seen. Once you open the very unique packaging you will see this sharpening system was designed and built by a machinist. There are many unique features on these TSPROF knife sharpeners including: a locking detented flipping mechanism, stops on the travel of the stones, a heavy duty base (it is substantial!) with rubber feet, and extremely precise adjustment control. Get your from Russia with love TSPROF Wranglestar Kit K2 from DLT Trading and we will ship ground in the continental US free of charge. We should also note, TSPROF sharpening systems do ship from our warehouse in Marinette, Wisconsin so you will not have to wait for them to ship from Russia.


Freehand sharpening on water stones. The process that delivers a euphoric sensation, one that draws you in and ignites senses that consistently makes you feel absolutely incredible and yearn for more is freehand sharpening. There is something very special about taking a dull knife to a water stone and soaking in the elements associated with sharpening knives by hand. The fact that mankind has being doing this for hundreds and hundreds of years and that genius sharpeners in Japan and other parts of the world use this method, it is inspiring and captivating. You don’t even need to be a great sharpener to enjoy this, this all can happen at day one, this does happen at day one, that is why there is a day two. There is no other method of sharpening that has the potential to reward the sharpener as much as freehand sharpening, I will stand my ground on this statement as hard as the 300 Spartan’s stood fast at the Hot Gates.
Instead of making a show of holding the steel in the air and dramatically sliding the knife against it, hold a honing steel vertically, with the tip resting on a work surface and the handle gripped firmly in one hand. Press the bottom of the knife’s blade (the thickest part) against the honing steel and, working at a 15-20 degree angle, pull the knife down and towards you. Follow through to the tip of the blade. Keeping the knife in the same hand, repeat the motion on the other side of the steel, reversing the angle of the blade against the honing steel.
When we wonder how sharp their swords were, we need to consider how they used them. They thrusted, that is, jabbed the point into an enemy, they cut, or chopped, and they sliced. Slicing cannot be done with a dull blade, as I discovered in my own kitchen. Knights, therefore, had to have a method of honing their blades at least as good as that with which our own kitchen knives are sharpened.

A: For many years there was a heated debate around this topic with manufacturer’s stating flatly the notion their products actually damaged knives was absurd, and many professional chefs claiming not only was it not absurd, it was common for mechanical sharpeners to damage expensive cutlery. So who was right? To a certain extent they both were. The manufacturers were correct in asserting that if you followed the instructions to the letter there was little if any chance your knives would be damaged. However, in reality few people actually followed the instructions to the letter and when they veered from the recommended course the potential was there for damage.
Knife sharpeners need to be able to create an exact angle on the knife's edge. American and European knife blades use a 20-degree angle out of the factory, as Chef's Choice explains, while Asian knife blades use a 15-degree angle. Hence, many people prefer a knife sharpening machine to a simple manual stone, because the machine helps guide you to maintain the proper angle on the blade.
Naniwa also makes the Naniwa Traditional line of stones, these are less expensive than the Professional lineup and I believe were created to compete in terms of cost with some other brands such as King that are less expensive, more attractive to some who are just starting and may not want to invest a lot of money. I have tried the Naniwa Traditional 220, 1,000 and 2,000 grit stones and I thoroughly enjoyed them, so if you are considering a less expensive brand to get started, these are also good. I do not like them as much as the Professional line but I do like them, they work, they make the knives sharp.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
The design of the knife sharpener is unique. It sticks to any flat surface due to the suction pad. This gives the user excellent control, safety, and confidence when using the knife sharpener. It can work on even serrated knives. The user needs just to slide your knife drawing it through one direction. It can be easily stored in a drawer making storage very easy.
Step 2 is to take the time to mark your stone. These marks will show whether or not the lapping plate has flattened a specific area on the stone. Make sure that you make a complete mark from one side of the stone to the other horizontally. The marks will wear away, when the plate has completely flattened each area appropriately. This is the only way to determine if the lapping plate is effectively doing its job.
Feedback is something that is very important to most sharpeners, i.e. how the stone feels when you are using it. Does it feel smooth, creamy and silky or does it feel hard and scratchy. While feedback, pleasant or unpleasant may be a purchase deterring factor it really doesn’t have any effect on level of sharpness that the stone can deliver. Unless of course the feedback is so distracting that it hinders the sharpeners focus and enjoyment and as a result, the sharpener doesn’t like what he/she is doing so that ultimately it does have the potential to negatively impact the results.

Once the burr is removed, it's time to test the sharpness with paper. Hold a piece of newspaper at about 45°, with a bit of tension, and slash lightly with each point of the blade. If it cuts through easily, your knife's sharp. Warner speedily lacerated his newspaper, but I of course struggled. There is an element of technique involved, he reassured me. 
Silicone Carbide whetstones on the other hand, are the fastest cutting of the three types of oil stones and the stones made by Norton are called Crystolon Stones. Also they too are graded as either fine, medium, or coarse stones depending on their grit. But, although these stones will not produce an edge as fine as Arkansas Oil Stones or India Oil Stones, their fast cutting ability makes them ideal for sharpening tools as well as for cutting the initial edge bevel on extremely dull knives or repairing the edge on damaged blades. Last, because they sharpen so quickly, it a common practice to start with a coarse Crystolon Oil Stone and then progress to either a medium or fine India Oil Stone and then to finish with an Arkansas Oil Stone.
✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.

Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand. 
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