Remember, we humans are pretty nifty sometimes. I found that my muscle memory was providing me with the opportunity to create edges that really forced me to compare with the edges off of the Edge Pro. It came to me that the Edge Pro had made me a better freehand sharpener, My confidence level had been boosted and with knives to sharpen daily, I was getting more comfortable with sharpening freehand every day, I was improving. That was about four years ago, what about today.
I bet those Vikings, relatives of mine no doubt, never had it so good. They never had surated blades to sharpen or needed to wear cool things around their necks to woo the women (they just grabbed them by the hair I guess). I love my stone. So useful and beautiful. I always have spit to wet it with, and I always have a way to sharpen my tool. Wazoo makes high quality products. I give them the highest rating I have. Dudes!
Before you start sharpening, soak the stone in water for around five to 10 minutes, until it absorbs the water and a liquid film appears on the surface. After soaking, splash some water on top, and re-splash during the process if it ever gets too dry. You'll get a dark, splotch of steel and stone building up on the stone while you're sharpening the blade. This is totally normal so just splash the stone with some water to clean it off and allow it to perform more efficiently. 
It sounds pretty simple and if precision equals sharpness then logically thinking, a guided system would reign supreme, every time. If only it were that simple, there is a lot more to this than you may think, arriving at an answer to this question, deserves much consideration of all the collateral elements we become exposed to as we sharpen knives.
Inspect the Handle – First and foremost, you will want to inspect the handle. Will it be comfortable, when it is held within your hand? Is the handle perfectly attached to the sharpening steel? Before purchasing one of these items, it is essential to look at the handful very carefully and ensure that it is well made and will provide you with long-term comfortable use and satisfaction. If the sharpening steel detaches from the handle, your purchase will likely be for naught. Therefore, this element is vital!
I don’t believe I can say what is a better method of sharpening knives, at least not with an answer that covers all the bases. For me personally, I prefer to sharpen freehand, in fact 95% of my sharpening is done this way. It provides a more enjoyable experience, the fact that the knives are sharp is as I have repeated many times, is a piece of the process only. The essence of sharpening includes a blend of personal rewards that is quite unique and these only come from sharpening by freehand for me. They are as important to me as creating extremely sharp edges, without the joy that I experience sharpening every knife by hand, I doubt I would continue to sharpen knives professionally. So for me, a person who sharpen daily and absorbs in all the benefits the art of sharpening provides, it is hands down a freehand world. But what if you don’t sharpen knives everyday?
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.

A sharpening stone is the most basic type of knife sharpener, this is not to say that they do not offer great benefits, but only that they do not have a lot of features. The traditional knife sharpener was constructed out of novaculite or aluminum oxide, but with technology the sharpening stone has come a long way. These stones are now constructed out of several different types of material including diamond, oil, water, and ceramic.


However, due to limited natural deposits and extensive quarrying over the centuries, true, high quality, Japanese water stones are now few and far between and are very expensive. Thus, various companies are now producing synthetic Japanese Water Stones which generally have a more consistent composition and grit size than natural stones as well as often begin somewhat harder and thus, lasting a bit longer; not to mention being cheaper to purchase.
The continuous angle adjustment feature will allow you to select a specific angle from 17-30 degrees, in 1 degree increments, which will offer unlimited options. It also comes with 4 different sharpening diamond stones including the 140 extra-coarse, 300 coarse, 600 fine, and the 1500 extra fine. You will never be forced to purchase another sharpening stone to ensure that every coarse level is covered, because these diamond hones will perfect your blade edge, in no time at all.
With V-notch systems, some people may experience difficulty applying just the right amount of pressure to ensure an even sharpening on the blade. The Brod & Taylor design includes a spring-loaded sharpening configuration that overcomes this problem for most people, according to the Kitchen Boy review. One Amazon customer reviewer experienced this problem. However, once you have the hang of this machine, it works great.
Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.
In recent years, some whetstone manufacturers have started producing ceramic whetstones made from hard, ceramic, powders that are mixed with Aluminum Oxide and then sintered to form a solid. But, rather than using oil or water to lubricate the whetstone, ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without lubrication and thus, they provide a significant advantage for chefs who need to keep their knives sharp but, who do not have either the room or time for using a bench water stone. Thus, they are commonly available as either bench stones, pocket stones, round rods, or triangular rods.
Absolutely solid item craftsmanship is top notch in general as to be expected from wazoo My only complaint is about my stone personally it's pretty bland and all white lacking in uniqueness and character there is one spot that shows some color when wet and it looks like it might be a weak point right on the top corner of the rounded end it may end up weakening with use and break off especially if it gets dropped but this is purely a fault and with the stone it's self and not with wazoo
Aluminum-Oxide oil stones are very popular man-made sharpening stones produced by an abrasives company called Norton and which are commonly called India Stones. Generally less expensive than Arkansas stones (aka Novaculite), these stones are graded coarse, medium, and fine and are designed for fast cutting. Yet, when the fine grit is used, they can also produce a relatively fine edge. Also, because India Oil Stones are both softer and coarser than Arkansas Stones, they are commonly used in conjunction with Novaculite to cut the initial edge bevels or, repair extremely dull or damaged edges before refining and polishing the bevel with an Arkansas Stone.

Various Sharpening Angles – Each system will be equipped with different sharpening angles. Why is this important? This is absolutely vital, because a different angle will provide you with a different finished result. Depending on the specific edge that you’re trying to accomplish, you will need a precise angle. In the same sense, the exact type of knife that you’re sharpening will play a role here. Different knives require different angles, in order to achieve the sharpest edge. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the system you choose is equipped with a suitable range of useable angles.


I’ve been sharpening knives for over 35 years. I have owned an Edge Pro Professional version for several years and I have sharpened thousands of knives with it. I have sharpened thousands of knives freehand as well. This is something I have pondered over for many years: Nobody is paying me to say what I say, sharpening knives is the most important thing in my life, therefore, I am qualified to express my opinion… “what’s the best knife sharpener?” Read on!
“I LOVE THIS SHARPENER! I didn’t need to use the first slot, that’s for grinding a new edge. I used the second slot for honing. That’s all most knives need anyway. My knife is sharp again, which makes less work for me and makes it safer to use. Dull knives are very dangerous. This also works on serrated knives. My favorite serrated was getting dull, which didn’t thrill me too much. [Didn’t know] for sure what I was going to do. Figured I was going to have to buy a new one. Slot No. 2 brought my serrated back to life. Used it on my kitchen scissors, too. Very happy camper here. Buy this. Great sharpener.”

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Step 2 is to take the time to mark your stone. These marks will show whether or not the lapping plate has flattened a specific area on the stone. Make sure that you make a complete mark from one side of the stone to the other horizontally. The marks will wear away, when the plate has completely flattened each area appropriately. This is the only way to determine if the lapping plate is effectively doing its job.
Three other positives to the Brød & Taylor: First, you can use it to sharpen serrated blades by tilting the blade in the horizontal plane so that only one carbide (generally the one on the right, given how the edges of most serrated blades are ground) contacts the metal. Second, it’s ambidextrous, because lefties simply have to turn it around to engage their dominant hand. And third, unique among our test models, it can sharpen blades all the way to the heel, because the left- and right-hand carbides meet at a single point. (The ⅜ inch of the blade that our Chef’sChoice picks leave unsharpened at the heel is largely ignorable, but praise where praise is due.)
Our test of the Brød & Taylor turned a dull blade into one that effortlessly and cleanly sliced both tomatoes and paper. Due to the reputation of V-notch carbide sharpeners, however, I was concerned about the durability of the edge, so I did an additional test: I used the Brød & Taylor to sharpen my old pocketknife, which uses 440C steel, one of the earliest knife-worthy stainless alloys and one that more refined alloys have since surpassed. I then made 50 slices through a cardboard box, rehoned and repolished the knife (but did not resharpen it), and made 50 more slices. After all that, I was still able to slice a tomato and peel an apple without problem. That’s impressive: Cardboard is so tough on blade edges that knifesmiths use it as a kind of stress test.
If you want a manual knife sharpener that works like most electric sharpeners -- just pull the knife through the slot -- then our top pick is the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 (Est. $65) manual knife sharpener. This knife sharpener has three slots, each armed with diamond-abrasive grinding wheels, and can sharpen a 15 or 20-degree blade; slot one is for a 15-degree blade, while slot two is for a 20-degree blade, and slot three can polish either blade angle.
Our guide attempts to give you the easiest methods for keeping your arsenal of knives sharp and ready. One final item to mention: Serrated knife blades won't work with all types of knife sharpeners. If you're using a pull-through or electric knife sharpener, it needs to have a serrated setting or the blade will lose the serration during sharpening.
Many electric sharpening units are designed with kitchen knives in mind. Some of them are suitable not just for culinary applications, but also for working on hunting and survival equipment or brush-management tools. Of course, you'd never want to be caught with a dull pocketknife when field-dressing a buck or building an emergency shelter. With today's wide range of available electric knife sharpeners, you never will be.
Historically, there are three broad grades of Japanese sharpening stones: the ara-to, or "rough stone", the naka-to or "middle/medium stone" and the shiage-to or "finishing stone". There is a fourth type of stone, the nagura, which is not used directly. Rather, it is used to form a cutting slurry on the shiage-to, which is often too hard to create the necessary slurry. Converting these names to absolute grit size is difficult as the classes are broad and natural stones have no inherent "grit number". As an indication, ara-to is probably (using a non-Japanese system of grading grit size) 500–1000 grit. The naka-to is probably 3000–5000 grit and the shiage-to is likely 7000–10000 grit. Current synthetic grit values range from extremely coarse, such as 120 grit, through extremely fine, such as 30,000 grit (less than half a micrometer abrasive particle size).[citation needed]
“In the 1970s when [Mrs. Gail Glesser] and I started selling knife sharpeners at local fairs, we were buying and selling other people’s sharpeners,” begins BLADE Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame© member Sal Glesser, CEO and founder of Spyderco. One of the sharpeners the Glessers sold was a V-stick type that they liked, though they identified some of its shortcomings.

Ceramic – Although the ceramic is used in the same manner, it is much more delicate and capable of delivering a much finer edge. With ceramic, you’ll need to select a grit. Typically, 1500 grit will be sufficient and will be able to provide you with a sufficiently sharp edge, with six to eight strokes. With this level of grit, you will not remove any metal from the blade, which is also a plus! If you want the best knife sharpener that is a sharpening steel, you’ll be better off with a ceramic model!


I was prepared not to believe the reviews I'd seen for this before. I was so ready to try it out and be disappointed and feel like I wasted $9. Boy, was I wrong. I can't believe the difference a sharp knife really makes. The AccuSharp makes it so easy to get that perfect blade in seconds. Nothing to plug into the wall, no moving parts. Just a very straight-forward product that works exactly how you hope it would. There are instructions included for opening the tool and flipping the sharpening blades around. If, somehow, your sharpener gets dulled, you effectively get to double its life. Nowadays, this feels like getting two for the price of one.
It has amazing features that make it the go-to product. These include triple action, professional results, and effectiveness. It works well on blunt knives that can be annoying making them very sharp in just minutes. The design of this knife sharpener makes it comfortable to use and able to complement any kitchen. This knife sharpener is very budget friendly due to the price that it comes in. It has three slots that perform different functions according to the blade that needs to be sharpened.
The iconic Wiltshire Stay Sharp Knives have been in homes since 1938, and are known and  trusted for their self-sharpening mechanism, as well as providing good quality durable knives. The Wiltshire Carving Knife is ideal for slicing poultry, roasts, and ham with its high quality stainless steel blade. Scabbard sharpens and hones the knife each time the knife is removed, while the triple rivet handle provides strength and durability. The coloured trim is perfect for quick identification in the drawer. The locking system ensures the knife is securely held in place, and has a safety lock button to release the knife.

The AccuSharp Sharpener is proof positive that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. While it looks like something used to attach buttons to shirts it’s actually one of the most cost effective, and we mean effective, means around for restoring a professional edge to your dull knives. It’s compact, screwed together rather than glued and its diamond coated tungsten carbide wheels create an edge that will last.


Be careful: Don’t move your fingers laterally along the edge, you’ll cut yourself. Feel for a rough area running from tip to heel. Again, it takes time to know what to expect because the best burr will be subtle. Just know that the bigger the burr, the more metal you are removing—more than necessary. Don’t worry, you won’t ruin the knife doing this. You’re learning here, and mistakes are part of the sharpening journey. Learn from them.
That’s a pity, because the merits of a sharp knife become apparent the moment you swipe through an onion with one. It’s pure pleasure. A sharp knife cuts easily and precisely, requiring little more pressure than the knife’s own weight to do the job.  By the end of this project, I was used to working with truly sharp knives. From now on, that’s how I’ll be keeping mine, and I hope to help you put aside your qualms and make knife sharpening part of your routine, too. Of course, that means you’ll need a knife sharpener—the question is, which one?
The Sunrise Pro doesn’t have the pedigree of some other knife sharpeners on our list but it performs as advertised and that’s all that matters. For a relative song you get to restore all the knives, steak knives, cleavers in your kitchen to near pristine condition. It’s easy to use and the nice strong suction cup on the bottom means you can put the band aids away.
Our second entry from Chef’s Choice is the 463 Pronto Santoku. This manual sharpener is super-simple to use and delivers fast, high quality results every time. While this is a “2-stage” system there’s nothing complicated about it. One slot is for sharpening and the other for honing. Both stages utilize diamond abrasive surfaces so your blades will retain its edge for a good long time.
When it comes to preparing meals, we Brits love spending time in the kitchen. In fact, it's believed we spend around six hours a week in there cooking up a storm, and that's why it's important to keep our equipment in good shape. Whether you're a carnivore cooking steaks, a veggie looking for some crisp vegetables or a baker knocking up a cake, keeping your knives ready to use is an essential part of kitchen equipment maintenance.
The paper test - Remove your knife from the sharpener. Grab a piece of notebook paper and hold it vertically in your hand so that one edge is facing straight up. Now take the knife and push it down against this edge. If the blade cuts through without hesitation it’s sharp. If the paper simply crumples beneath the blade instead of cutting the blade needs a bit more work.

The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.
Inspect the Handle – First and foremost, you will want to inspect the handle. Will it be comfortable, when it is held within your hand? Is the handle perfectly attached to the sharpening steel? Before purchasing one of these items, it is essential to look at the handful very carefully and ensure that it is well made and will provide you with long-term comfortable use and satisfaction. If the sharpening steel detaches from the handle, your purchase will likely be for naught. Therefore, this element is vital!
Serrated knives are also sharpened during this final stage. The flexible stropping disks are able to straighten the misaligned teeth of the serrated edge. Each prominent tooth of the serrated edge is sharpened, so that they’re essentially a super-sharp micro-blade all lined up. The 3rd stage abrasive is effective yet gentle, and it can extend the lifespan of your serrated knives regardless of the alloy it uses, or if it is forged or non-forged.

Our observations about the types of sharpeners on the following pages are based heavily on our experience using them. Why? Because if a sharpener is a pain to use, then it’s going to stay in the drawer where it will be of minimal benefit to our knives. We tried the sharpeners with a variety of knives—all stainless steel—including paring, slicing, boning, utility, and chef’s knives of various lengths; most were tragically dull when we started. We didn’t try serrated, ceramic, or other specialty knives.
The best knife sharpeners are easy to use and give your knives that desirable sharp edge. Because knife sharpeners exist in a variety of configurations, finding just the right type of knife sharpener for your needs requires a bit of sharp study. (Apologies for the bad pun.) Continue reading to learn more about this product area that will give your search for the best knife sharpener the proper edge! (We're really sorry.)
The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.
If you’re looking for total convenience, easy of use and no guesswork, you’ll find that the electric knife sharpener is undeniably the very best knife sharpener for you. Be prepared for a little bigger sharpener, if you decide to purchase one of these. They can be a little bit large and will sit on your countertop of table. Usually, they’re rectangular or square and fairly lightweight, so you’ll easily be able to hide yours in the cabinet once you’ve finished using it.
Stropping only requires an extra minute or less. It’s worth it! You get all the advantages of this fast and foolproof carbide scraper, PLUS the refined polished edge that not only lasts longer, but keeps metal out of your food. Pliant leather automatically produces a micro-bevel or rather a “micro curved bevel.” THAT is what makes your edges long lasting AND super sharp.
Now that you're holding the handle and the blade is in position, gently apply some pressure to the belly of the blade with your left hand fingers – "roughly the amount of pressure to semi depress a sponge," says Warner. Starting at the tip, glide the blade up and down the stone – around five strokes up and down is a good number. Then move to the middle – five more strokes. Finally five strokes up and down on the heel.
The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
It is believed that Vikings suspended these knife sharpening tools from their belt. However, it is not exactly clear, even to scholars, how the Vikings wore these pendants. We laced ours with a versatile, adjustable high-quality leather cord and packed it in a USA-made muslin pouch so you get to choose how to wear it or carry it. Wear it around the neck for the most Ragnariest looking necklace you’ve ever seen, cinch it all the way down so that it can be hitched to your belt or clipped onto your pack, or simply pocket it while still contained in the hand-stamped muslin pouch.
J. Kenji López-Alt is the Chief Culinary Advisor of Serious Eats, and author of the James Beard Award-nominated column The Food Lab, where he unravels the science of home cooking. A restaurant-trained chef and former Editor at Cook's Illustrated magazine, his first book, The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science is a New York Times Best-Seller, the recipient of a James Beard Award, and was named Cookbook of the Year in 2015 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

Absolutely solid item craftsmanship is top notch in general as to be expected from wazoo My only complaint is about my stone personally it's pretty bland and all white lacking in uniqueness and character there is one spot that shows some color when wet and it looks like it might be a weak point right on the top corner of the rounded end it may end up weakening with use and break off especially if it gets dropped but this is purely a fault and with the stone it's self and not with wazoo


If you decide to use this device to sharpen a knife, you can simply attach the blade guide against the belt, creating a barrier against which you can lean your knife as you sharpen it. Leaning your knife against the guard holds it at a specific angle so that your blade can be sharpened to a specific angle. The angle is adjustable from 30 degrees down to 15 degrees. You can also choose to use this machine to sharpen tools, such as axes. If sharpening those types of blades, you will want to go with a freehand approach instead of using the guide.
This impressive Chef’s Choice sharpener is not the only Chef’s Choice sharpener on this list. That must tell you something about its quality. I must say that I was very impressed with this sharpener. It features three stages: rough, fine, and hone. The first two stages use sharpening discs with diamond flecks as abrasives. They gently file down your blade, bringing it to a smoother, sharper point. Stage three features patented honing and polishing discs designed to straighten your blade for the sharpest, cleanest cuts possible. Its rubber feet keep it firmly planted upon your countertop for an easy and safe sharpening process.

This Chef Sharp manual knife sharpener is made to sit solidly on your countertop or whatever workspace you like. Its soft, rubbery bottom provides the perfect non-slip surface no matter what type of material you are working on. The smoothest of countertops will be no match for this sharpener, it will stay perfectly still as you work. To offer extra stability and support, this sharpener also includes a horizontal steel handle. Holding onto this handle will not only help to keep your sharpener steady, it will also keep you steady as you draw your blade through either of the two sharpening slots.

i have been sharpening knives all my life [im 61] ,its more of a relaxing hobby than anything else but i hate working with a dull blade.i have never used a water stone before and intend to buy some and get going.all ive ever used are oil stones and i can get an edge i can shave with [provided the knife is of a good steel ],so ive been reasonably happy with myself ,i was just wondering if you have ever tried sharpening with an oil stone and what differences you have found.i also have a lansky kit which i use every now and then but i find hand sharpening gives a better edge..

First choice knife sharpener for professional chefs. It doesn’t matter whether you work in a five start hotel, or you just love preparing meals at home, this device will keep your knives sharp always. It gets the job done effortlessly and efficiently. A knife sharpened with this device retains its edge for a longer period, as compared to others. Apart from kitchen use, its compact design makes it perfect for hunting, camping, and fishing trips.

Although this is somewhat counterintuitive, soft, heavy steel is often more resilient to nicks and dulling than harder steel. Carbon steel, known for the high level of attention and care it demands, actually holds a better edge and is more easily sharpened than its stainless counterpart. On the other hand, while harder alloys require less daily honing, some high-hardness steel can become brittle and prone to chipping. For example, it's important to use only smooth honing rods on harder Japanese-style knives to prevent micro-serrations that diminish the edge and lifespan of the blade.
You love your set of knives from Food Network; you use them for everything, and it is starting to show. You know it is time for a sharpening stone to be used when you try to slice a tomato and end up squashing it against the cutting board. What once was a great set of knives is now a dull safety hazard, but they can be razor sharp again. Reliable sellers on eBay offer a variety of knife sharpening stone options. You can choose from a diamond sharpening stone, a wet stone, and several other effective options. The sharpening stone is lightweight and easy to ship, so sellers offer a variety of convenient shipping items to deliver your item to you quickly. Once it arrives, read all the instructions, and carefully sharpen each knife. After the dull knives have been honed, your favorite set of knives will cut as easily as they did when you bought them, maybe even better.
Whether you’re purchasing a Smith’s or Zwilling J.A. Henckels pull-through knife sharpener, you will want to make sure that you look at the item carefully! Although each of these are similarly made and work the same, they’re also very different. Suffice to say, some will be better as an overall investment. Since you want to obtain the best pull-through knife sharpener, you will want to explore each of the characteristics below!
A: Another issue that comes up with electric knife sharpeners is how to clean them. Or if, in fact, they actually need cleaning at all. The answer to the second question is that yes, they do need to be cleaned occasionally. And by occasionally we mean once a year or so if you use them with any frequency. Obviously if you’ve only used the sharpener a few times then there’s no compelling reason to clean it, other than just wanting to keep things tidy (and there’s nothing wrong with that). So, having established that sharpeners do need to be cleaned occasionally you need to know how to do so in a safe and effective manner. It’s not complicated.

“I have been looking for a larger sharpening stone, so I was pleased to find this 12-inch stone. As some others have reported, while this states it is a fine stone, it is not. It has two grits, and one is very coarse, and I would rate the other as medium. I have a fine stone to finish the process, albeit a small one, but it works. I am very happy with the stone and would recommend it — but make sure you have a fine stone to finish.”
For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)
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