This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.
I've always wanted to sharpen knives on water stones, and this set gave me the motivation to finally give it a shot. The price is amazing for the quality and content of the set. It comes with all the grits you need to sharpen anything... I usually start on the 400 grit if the knife is very dull, or directly on the 1000 grit if it's not too dull. The 3000 and 8000 grit stones are softer and ideal after the coarser stones. The online learning section is truly amazing, much better than I expected. A convenient place with instructional videos and many articles about knife sharpening. Only downside is that the knives are now so sharp I need to be very careful using them... but that's a good thing! I feel like I fell in love with knife sharpening again.

You will indeed feel a sharp difference in how easily your knives cut after being sharpened with the tool. And that’s not only because they have smaller angled edges. The fine sharpening and polishing stages remove all the little chips and create very fine grooves on the blades, allowing them to go smoothly through the toughest materials and leaving minimal tears behind.

✅ SAFETY : We understand the importance of safety when dealing with sharpening tools, your purchase comes with Silicone base for holding the stone inside Non Slip Bamboo base, this setup will ensure the stone is FIXED IN ONE PLACE while sharpening. And knife sharpening angle guide allows you to maintain CORRECT ANGLE and safely apply consistent pressure while sharpening the blade.


the pros: when the 'latch' is in place it rests firm and secure against my countertop. THIS is the freakin' best. it's compact and fits nicely in the drawer beneath by cooktop. of the two knives i've attempted to sharpen, the non-serrated one is practically back to its original state. sa-weet. not related to the product itself: the email comms and follow up from the seller - to confirm safe delivery of my purchase, inclusion of a pdf with usage directions - are a good look.

Now you may wonder, if a finer stone produces a better cutting edge why do I need a coarse stone at all? The answer is that finer stones work much more slowly than coarse ones. The amount of metal a fine stone removes with each pass is much less than what a coarse stone removes. If you have an edge with a good shape to it from a coarse stone, this is not a problem because the fine stone doesn’t have to remove much metal to improve the edge. If the edge is dull, it will take many times longer to reshape it with a fine stone than it would with a coarse one.
The Spyderco 2014MF Tri-Angle's open construction and pre-set angles mean you can use it to sharpen just about anything, including 20-degree Western knives, 15-degree Asian knives, serrated blades and scissors. Users say the learning curve is quick and the results are great, and optional diamond sharpening rods remove enough steel to re-shape even damaged blades. The angled sharpening rods do double duty as safety rails to protect your hands.

★ EASY AND SAFE TO USE – We designed this honing stone with the upmost attention to detail when it came to ease of use and safety. Your kit is super easy to assemble and comes with a Silicone Base that holds the stone within the Non-Slip Bamboo Base so there is absolutely no slippage while you work. The Bonus Knife Sharpening Angle Guide will put your blade on the optimal angle for you and protect your fingers throughout the sharpening process.
I can personally verify that this will get your knives very sharp. I will spare you all the gory details, but the picture is of the instructions the ER sent me home with after stopping the bleeding and patching me up. I have to say, that’s not what I had in mind regarding “Thanksgiving tips”. So: not only will knives slide easily through spinach, but they will go through finger and fingernail like a hot knife through butter after being sharpened by this whetstone. Very clean, straight cut. Impressive, really. Just take it slow and don’t be a moron like me.
A: People often make the mistake of assuming that just because a mechanical knife sharpener will sharpen the edge of a knife that means it will sharpen any type of cutting edge, including scissors. This is a mistake and can wind up being a costly mistake when you have to replace both your scissors and the knife sharpener. There are sharpening devices specifically designed to handle scissors. Or you can bring your scissors to a sharpening pro who will usually have the right equipment on hand to also sharpen scissors. Another thing to keep in mind about trying to use a sharpener to sharpen scissors is that by using the device in this fashion you are likely voiding the warranty. As such if you damage the device trying to sharpen scissors you’ll need to pay to have it repaired or replaced as the warranty won’t cover it. Also, certain types of high end scissors also come with a warranty. And, just as with the sharpener itself, if you try to sharpen them using a mechanical sharpener you can say goodbye to the warranty protection. The bottom line is to always use the appropriate tool for the job at hand. That way you’re assured of the best possible result and any warranty remains in effect.
What about electric sharpeners, there are some expensive and well built machines out there that claim to sharpen knives. I have seen the edges off of these machines and I can agree that they have the ability to sharpen a knife. However, at what expense to the knife and also, do what degree of sharpness? I believe that there is a place for these, not in my world, but there are circumstances where they can come in handy. Let’s face it, there are people who need sharp knives at their workplace, sharp enough to get the job done, and they may not have any interest in the process just the results. At least they are doing sometime that stops them from using dull knives. It is also possible that people who run a knife through and electric grinder and are impressed with the result have never seen a truly sharp knife. I don’t think that the folks who use these devices believe that they are creating world class edges, they just need “sharp” and need it fast so why not. Yes, the machine is likely removing more metal than necessary but, in some cases, it can still work.
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
The results I’ve obtained using the Wicked Edge are truly amazing. When I put a full mirror edge on my knives (as outlined below) they can literally whittle hair and “pop” the hair clean off your arm! If you are so inclined you can turn the Wicked Edge into a small business sharpening for the local population or at the various shows. I know several people who do this on a regular basis.
Very quickly, we gravitated toward the ceramic rods, which all performed well on both types of blade; the steel honing rods created tiny chips on the Japanese blades. That’s because steel honing rods are made of exceptionally hard metal covered with fine ridges. These ridges bend softer German knife edges back into alignment, but harder Japanese knife edges have a tendency to break rather than bend. The ceramic rods also provided a very slight stickiness or friction when honing that made it easier to sweep the blades in smooth strokes, as you’re supposed to. Steel hones feel slick—the blade wants to slip instead of glide—and that makes them a bit trickier to master. And for the reasons above, the Idahone rapidly became our favorite among the ceramic rods. We’re also not alone in liking it: It’s extremely well-reviewed on Amazon and is recommended by many specialist knife retailers, including Chef Knives To Go, Epicurean Edge, and Knife Merchant.
This article is not about how to sharpen a knife, check this article instead, but briefly, a coarse stone is critical, it has the potential to raise a Burr quickly and make a dull knife sharp quickly. The correct use of pressure enables us to form a burr, remove the burr and then do some coarse stone refinement and thus create a very sharp knife. This sensation is motivation, it is a confidence builder and will enhance your sharpening experience, so believe me when I say that a coarse stone is your first priority. I recommend a 400, 600 or 800 grit. After that, depending on the knives you are sharpening strive to obtain stone combination, such as a 400 – 1,000 – 5,000 grit three stone combination is going to allow you to achieve knives sharper than most people have ever seen.
Historically, there are three broad grades of Japanese sharpening stones: the ara-to, or "rough stone", the naka-to or "middle/medium stone" and the shiage-to or "finishing stone". There is a fourth type of stone, the nagura, which is not used directly. Rather, it is used to form a cutting slurry on the shiage-to, which is often too hard to create the necessary slurry. Converting these names to absolute grit size is difficult as the classes are broad and natural stones have no inherent "grit number". As an indication, ara-to is probably (using a non-Japanese system of grading grit size) 500–1000 grit. The naka-to is probably 3000–5000 grit and the shiage-to is likely 7000–10000 grit. Current synthetic grit values range from extremely coarse, such as 120 grit, through extremely fine, such as 30,000 grit (less than half a micrometer abrasive particle size).[citation needed]
The Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 is our overall pick among knife sharpeners. A manual model, it was the easiest of all our test models to use—almost intuitive, in fact: You insert the blade in one of the slots and run it back and forth, from heel to tip, until the tool grinds a new edge. The sharpening elements are wheels impregnated with diamond abrasive—a material that Cook’s Illustrated found to be superior (subscription required) to ceramics in both sharpening speed and lack of friction. In our test, about 30 strokes on the coarse wheels under light pressure cut a brand-new edge. Another 20 strokes on the fine, polishing wheels gave the edge a reasonably smooth finish.
Although electric knife sharpeners don't provide as much control as manual sharpeners, they're faster and easier to use. In most cases, you pull the knife slowly through specially designed slots in the sharpener; abrasives hidden inside the slots do the sharpening. Electric knife sharpeners tend to be larger than manual models, so keep storage or counter space in mind.
At age 10, Terada learned the basics of sushi from his father and then went on to attend RKC Chef's School in Kochi, Japan from 1987-1989. He soon earned a nickname for his fast knife, attention to detail, divine presentation and ability to create new dishes and accents based on traditional Japanese cuisine. After graduating RKC Chef School, he was called to serve under Master Chef Kondo at Yuzuan restaurant in Kochi, Japan from 1989-1992. Mr. Kondo is the master of Kansai style cooking, considered to be the high-end of Japanese cuisine. Terada earned the title Master Sushi Chef by becoming the standing head sushi chef & can serve Fugu (Japan Licensed) to the public.
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