The edge the Trizor XV made was the best in our tests. In contrast to the “toothy” edge that the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 creates, the Trizor XV polishes an edge to a razorlike finish—meaning the knife is perfectly capable of straight-up-and-down chop-cutting of items like onions and garlic, as well as traditional push- and pull-cutting. Perhaps the highest compliment we can give the Trizor XV is that, when the test was done, we resharpened the knives that we had used with the rejected competition models on the Trizor XV.

I am completely satisfied with the quality and value of this product. I have been able to get my kitchen knives "scary sharp". I can slice ripe tomatos almost paper thin with very little pressure. Thank you for the prompt delivery as well. I haven't tried the blade guide yet but I am sure it would work satisfactorily as it has rollers on either side and may even prolong the life of the stone and having to use the flattening stone as often.


Believe it or not the company have put a bit of effort into refining the look of their product to make it more aesthetically appealing. Whether or not they’ve succeeded we’ll let you decide. Once you get accustomed to the Classic II however the results are undeniable and the whole thing will make perfect sense. Use it on your kitchen knives, hunting knives, utility knives and more and enjoy the same high quality finish every time.
When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
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