Be sure to note what kind of edge the ProntoPro 4643 puts on a knife. Chef’sChoice describes it as having “a lot of bite.” That’s accurate. It’s also a nice way of saying that the edge doesn’t end up polished to a fine point but comes out rather “toothy,” or microscopically serrated. This result isn’t a bad thing at all; it’s the sort of edge that most traditional European knives, including those of the highest quality, came with. Toothy edges perform sensationally if you are doing push- or pull-cuts—the sort where you move the knife tip away or toward you as you slice, and the sort most people do. Just be aware that, if you are used to chop-cutting (pushing the blade straight down through a food item), you may have a hard time if you sharpen with the ProntoPro 4643.
Finally, you have the knife sharpening systems. Although these might not be for everyone, they’re highly innovative and offer astounding results. These particular sharpeners are capable of taking control and getting the task completed for you. You won’t need experience or practice, because the system will sort through all of the complications. The blade just needs to be set in place and the sharpening system will begin working its magic. Although this offers total convenience and the very best results imaginable, these machines are ultimately the most expensive.
Despite their name, sharpening steels don’t sharpen knives in actual sense. Their main job is honing a knife blade. However, certain styles or cuts can perform some minor sharpening. You should note that steels that sharpen knives should not be used in place of normal sharpeners. The most common types of cuts include diamond, regular, ceramic or combination. The differences in these cuts are subtle. The choice of cuts depends on what you want to achieve with the honing steel, as well as your budget
Diamond whetstones, like the DMT Diamond Whetstone, are made out of industrial type diamonds which create a long-lasting hard, coarse and flat surface. A diamond whetstone is an excellent choice for when you are outdoors as you can use it dry or with a lubricant. It can take some time getting used to and the larger sized stone may not be ideal for working with small knives or cutting tools.
I bought this in April and it's no longer sharpening my kitchen knives to it's once great way. At first, it was doing a fantastic job and sharpened the kitchen knives as expected making them very very sharp. Now, it's just something I don't bother using anymore because I'll need to touch the knives to a honing stone to make them sharp. I did give it 3 stars because at first it was truly amazing and now it's not worth being in my kitchen.
The cost of the most basic Wicked Edge package is about $300 plus $65 for a base to mount the system to (otherwise you’ll mount it directly to a table or bench). The basic package is great but if you can afford a little more I recommend getting the Pro-Pack II upgrade kit at $150 as that contains the micro adjustable arms shown in my run down of how to use the system. An Angle Cube is also a worthwhile investment generally running around $30 on Amazon. Finally, I would recommend getting the 600 / 1000 diamond stones and the 14 / 10-micron leather strops at a minimum. This would bring the total cost of the recommended kit to about $655 dollars. Yes, it’s a lot of money but if you’re serious about your knives it becomes a no-brainer.
I spent a few years trying out different sharpening systems from Grandpa’s old Arkansas Stones to a Lansky system but none of them really clicked with me and did not seem very intuitive, repeatable or all that accurate. Those few characteristics are important as each time you sharpen your knife it removes metal from the edge and thus eats into the overall service life of your valuable and often-times costly tool. Therefore it’s important that your sharpening is accurate and repeatable, removing as little material as physically possible to prolong the service life of your knife.
“I have been looking for a larger sharpening stone, so I was pleased to find this 12-inch stone. As some others have reported, while this states it is a fine stone, it is not. It has two grits, and one is very coarse, and I would rate the other as medium. I have a fine stone to finish the process, albeit a small one, but it works. I am very happy with the stone and would recommend it — but make sure you have a fine stone to finish.”
For absolute dull knives, the first stage has to be through the coarse slot that works on a diamond wheel system. Diamond is one of the hardest substances on the face of the earth and ideal for sharpening. By pulling even the dullest of knives through this slot, the diamond wheel sees to it that an angle is formed on both sides a knife’s bevel edge.

This is a great value for those who want a complete set of Shapton stones- from fine to coarse grit. The Shapton glass stone is the essential sharpening tool for any professional or home cook serious about knife care. A synthetic stone with a high degree of uniform abrasion, the Shapton needs no soaking. Compared to other synthetic stones, it creates an edge faster and doesn't wear down as quickly. So the Shapton glass stone makes shaping your knife easier and more convenient. And even when the abrasive surface becomes paper-thin, this stone still performs, thanks to its sturdy glass backing plate. Shapton glass stones are also engineered to produce no odor, unlike regular whetstones, which can leave an unpalatable odor on knives unless they're carefully cleaned. This is a distinct advantage for cooks who need to quickly shape their knives in the heat of service. The Shapton HR (High Resistance) glass stone series is suitable for both stain-resistant and carbon steel knives. Use the #500 to create a new, rough edge or fix small chips, the #2000 to create a cutting edge and the #16000 to polish and smooth out the edge.
It’s only the 2nd electric powered sharpener on our list but you can’t lose if you make the Chef’s Choice Trizor 15XV your sharpener of choice for double and single bevel Asian knives. This 3-stage sharpener provides something others don’t in that it converts any blade to a hyper-sharp 15 degree blade. The graduated manner by which it reaches that preferred angle also ensures the blade stays sharper, longer. And isn’t that the name of the game?
Knives can last a long time, provided they are properly maintained. Cleaning, polishing, and oiling your knife all contribute to the longevity of the blade. Sharpen your knives frequently. I'm sure you have heard the saying, a dull knife is more dangerous than a sharp one. If you are uncertain as to how to test if you blade is dull, there are a number of tests you can perform.
Once the knife is secured into the vise properly using both set screws you then slide one of the diamond stones onto the sharpening guides. Once the stone is on the guide you then attach the angle cube to the stone (it attaches automatically as the angle cube has magnets on it). With the angle cube you can adjust the angle the guides are set at to your particular preference (I prefer 36 inclusive myself).
We bought this for our parents as a little random gift to have at their home. I suggest using it for your cheaper everyday knives. It sharpens really well! The only drawback is that my husband noticed that eventually it bent some a few of the cheapo knives. The knives were cheap, but this sharpener ended up damaging them (but still got them to be sharper). If you don't really care for the little dings and changes to a small portion of your knife, as we don't with our cheap ones, it's still worth using! I suggest to only use them on your more inexpensive knives because I'm not sure how I'd feel using them on more expensive knives, because you really don't want to damage those in case it does the same thing to them!
Remember, we humans are pretty nifty sometimes. I found that my muscle memory was providing me with the opportunity to create edges that really forced me to compare with the edges off of the Edge Pro. It came to me that the Edge Pro had made me a better freehand sharpener, My confidence level had been boosted and with knives to sharpen daily, I was getting more comfortable with sharpening freehand every day, I was improving. That was about four years ago, what about today.
I am the guy that cannot sharpen a knife, no patience. This is the best sharpener I have ever used. Watch a few videos online, try it with a 'junk' knife to practice, that 'junk' knife will be better than brand new very quickly. Once you get how to use it,, its fastest, easiest sharpener you will ever own. 10 times better than those boxed electric grinders they call sharpeners. I live in Michigan and hunt and fish.

Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.
After testing nine honing rods, both steel and ceramic, we think the Idahone 12″ fine ceramic rod is best for most kitchens. We were looking for a tool that kept knives of all styles sharp, from 4-inch paring knives to 12-inch chef’s knives. We wanted one that worked equally well on German and Japanese blades, which are made of softer and harder steels, respectively. We also wanted to pay less than $40. The Idahone met all our requirements. Its surface was noticeably smoother than that of the other three ceramic models we tried, yet rapidly restored the edges of all the knives we tested. It also removed less material from the blades, which will help to prolong their working lives. And compared with the five steel honing rods we tested, the Idahone was gentler on the blades.
Our guide attempts to give you the easiest methods for keeping your arsenal of knives sharp and ready. One final item to mention: Serrated knife blades won't work with all types of knife sharpeners. If you're using a pull-through or electric knife sharpener, it needs to have a serrated setting or the blade will lose the serration during sharpening.
The unique three stone system features a 6" medium Arkansas, 6" fine Arkansas and 6" coarse synthetic stone mounted on a molded plastic triangle with handles on the end for easy stone selection. The sturdy molded plastic base has non-skid rubber feet for safety, a V-shaped trough to catch oil drippings and easy-to- read stone identification markings.
The Smith’s PP1 Pocket Pal is a knife sharpening system that is capable of sharpening knifes that are equipped with serrations and gut hooks. These are the trickiest knives to try to sharpen, because of their unique designed blade. As a matter of fact, if you do not select the appropriate sharpening tool, you could potentially burn or damage the blade, which would be devastating for your hunting expedition.
In fact, I got this exclusively for family members who do not know or care about sharpening. When I must cook at my in-law’s house for holiday dinners, I bring this instead of my precious chef’s knives. In a few minutes, I can sharpen several of their criminally mistreated kitchen knives without fuss or mess. That makes me seem like a double hero. (both chef and sharpener)
×