It is designed to help sharpen straight bladed knives that are made of steel. It cannot be used on ceramic and serrated edges. The two sharpening modes guarantee the user gets the best service from it. It has been designed with the users’ safety in mind. This is due to the large grip handle and the non-slip feet. It has an attractive design that makes it a great addition to any kitchen.
Do you have dull or blunt blades that are lying in the kitchen? If yes, then you can easily bring them back to life, with the Priority Chef Knife Sharpener. It doesn’t matter how long the knife has stayed without being used. This knife sharpener has all what it takes, to revive your knife and make it as sharp as new. You don’t need to spend money buying a new set of blades. With this device, you can recycle your dull, old and forgotten stockpile, and then sharpen them back to life.
Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
Many households can benefit tremendously, by owning an electric knife sharpener. Typically, these sharpeners are slightly expensive, but this isn’t the case with the Presto 08800. This particular sharpener is actually very affordable! It only weighs around 3 pounds, so it’s much lighter than other electric models. Many people will find this extremely beneficial, since it’ll allow them to transport the device and easily store it somewhere out of the way.

When it comes to preparing meals, we Brits love spending time in the kitchen. In fact, it's believed we spend around six hours a week in there cooking up a storm, and that's why it's important to keep our equipment in good shape. Whether you're a carnivore cooking steaks, a veggie looking for some crisp vegetables or a baker knocking up a cake, keeping your knives ready to use is an essential part of kitchen equipment maintenance.
However, it should also be noted that “water stones” are generally significantly softer than oil stones and thus, water stones generally cut faster than oil stones but, they also have to be flattened more often that oil stones do. Furthermore, it should be noted that some water stones must be soaked in water for several hours prior to use whereas, others are of the “splash and sharpen” variety and thus, they only need to be soaked for a few minutes before use and then wetted down occasionally during sharpening process. Diamond hones on the other hand are more durable than either water stones or oil stones and, because they generally have a more coarse grit, they cut faster than natural whetstones. Plus, due to their construction, they never need truing and, in fact, coarse diamond hones are often used to flatten both natural and synthetic whetstones.
To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.

I've had this for a while now, about 6 months. It works like a charm. I have a Victorinox chef's knife, it was getting pretty beat up and dull. It took a few times to get the blade to stay sharp, again because of how beat up it was. Now it stays sharp through just about anything. I run it through the AccuSharp about once a week to maintain the blade. I can go from cutting raw sweet potatoes to thin slicing tomatoes. I use my knife daily. The other day on a whim I used the AccuSharp on a Ginsu (don't judge me) Santoku knife to see if it could redeem it. It took quite a few passes, but it did actually help. I thought it was beyond hope and it was left in the drawer forgotten. There is a major nick still, but it is actually usable now. I've used it to sharpen those cheap little paring knives too. So far it's worked on every blade we've put it to. We recently gave one to my father in law and he went to work sharpening every blade he could find! So be warned, you will go hunting for things to sharpen.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
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