Be sure to note what kind of edge the ProntoPro 4643 puts on a knife. Chef’sChoice describes it as having “a lot of bite.” That’s accurate. It’s also a nice way of saying that the edge doesn’t end up polished to a fine point but comes out rather “toothy,” or microscopically serrated. This result isn’t a bad thing at all; it’s the sort of edge that most traditional European knives, including those of the highest quality, came with. Toothy edges perform sensationally if you are doing push- or pull-cuts—the sort where you move the knife tip away or toward you as you slice, and the sort most people do. Just be aware that, if you are used to chop-cutting (pushing the blade straight down through a food item), you may have a hard time if you sharpen with the ProntoPro 4643.

I spent a few years trying out different sharpening systems from Grandpa’s old Arkansas Stones to a Lansky system but none of them really clicked with me and did not seem very intuitive, repeatable or all that accurate. Those few characteristics are important as each time you sharpen your knife it removes metal from the edge and thus eats into the overall service life of your valuable and often-times costly tool. Therefore it’s important that your sharpening is accurate and repeatable, removing as little material as physically possible to prolong the service life of your knife.
One of the combinations of stones that I was introduced to several years ago is a unique one, it is a 500, 2,000 and 16,000 grit combination. I was apprehensive when I first tried this, that was thousands of knives ago, it works, it is fantastic combination. It is unique because the traditional way of thinking is that we should be doubling the grit sizes as we sharpen, for example, a 500 grit stone should be followed by a 1,000 grit, then 2,000 grit. This line of thought is meant to be flexible, it is a general rule only, I have broken it countless times.
For professional-grade sharp knives, then this product is a good option for you. The sharpening angle is set to be 150, meaning that you can use it to work on single bevel 150 and double bevel class of knives. But if you have the 200 class of knives, then you can use this electric sharpener to convert them to the 150 class. A better cut and long-lasting sharpness results in the process.
Our guide attempts to give you the easiest methods for keeping your arsenal of knives sharp and ready. One final item to mention: Serrated knife blades won't work with all types of knife sharpeners. If you're using a pull-through or electric knife sharpener, it needs to have a serrated setting or the blade will lose the serration during sharpening.

For chefs of all skill levels, it is absolutely vital to have a good sharpener in the kitchen. Of course, you need a specific type of sharpener with precise characteristics. You need one that works with your knives! It is also vital to choose one that works quickly and accurately. You don’t want to end up with a blade that has been deformed by the sharpener. Below, you will be able to find a breakdown of some of the very best kitchen knife sharpeners on the market. 
A sharpening stone is the most basic type of knife sharpener, this is not to say that they do not offer great benefits, but only that they do not have a lot of features. The traditional knife sharpener was constructed out of novaculite or aluminum oxide, but with technology the sharpening stone has come a long way. These stones are now constructed out of several different types of material including diamond, oil, water, and ceramic.

For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)


The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.

Many households can benefit tremendously, by owning an electric knife sharpener. Typically, these sharpeners are slightly expensive, but this isn’t the case with the Presto 08800. This particular sharpener is actually very affordable! It only weighs around 3 pounds, so it’s much lighter than other electric models. Many people will find this extremely beneficial, since it’ll allow them to transport the device and easily store it somewhere out of the way.


This rod features no abrasions. Instead, it features long grooves. This tells me that it has been made for honing, not sharpening. That is okay, though, because that is what most people look to a rod for – its honing ability. Unlike the Wusthof, which was awarded “Best Rod”, this Winware is not magnetic. That is also okay, though, since this rod is made strictly for honing and will not need to grip onto any metal shards, as no metal shards will be removed from the blade during the honing process.
Good article, but pull through sharpeners remove way too much material. Great for cheap knives but not so great for your good knives. Also, sharpening steels really don’t sharpen. As you use your knife the microscopic edge will bend and twist making the edge less sharp. A steel straightens that edge without removing material. You’ll often see butches and chefs using the steel a lot as they work. Keeps the edge sharp without wearing the knife down.
Like most sharpeners, this one is not equipped to handle scissors or serrated blades. Also unfortunate is the fact that, despite searching and searching for information, I was unable to discover this machine’s sharpening angle. Usually, it is safe to assume that sharpeners with unmentioned angles will be best suited to American and European-style knives, but I cannot say for certain.
Knife sharpeners work by stripping away metal to form new bevels, ideally at an angle that closely matches the original. But you don’t need to obsess over getting the angle exactly right. For most kitchen knives, consistency trumps precision, says David Marks, a professional knife sharpener and owner of Stoddard’s, a Boston cutlery store and sharpening service: “As long as you keep the same angle throughout the process, it doesn’t matter if you’re off by a couple of degrees from the original angle.” Since consistency is key, many knife sharpeners incorporate some means of setting the angle for you.
The product of German, and it works on sharpening standard knives and also Asian style knives at the comfort of your home. It is very easy to use making it very user-friendly. It has a soft grip handle that guarantees the user comfort when using the knife sharpener. The fitted weights and rubber base allows control, durability and heightened balance. The steel construction makes it durable and sturdy.
A: When it comes to the best knife sharpeners used in a domestic setting the abrasives used to sharpen the blade should last for quite a few years. When they do eventually wear out many of the best manufacturers will refurbish them for you, typically for a nominal fee. Again, however, unless you are using the sharpener on a daily basis (and there is virtually no reason the average person would do this), the sharpener should last for many years before ever needing service.
If you’re a dedicated home chef, or if you simply demand the best possible edge that doesn’t involve messing with stones or jigs, we recommend the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV Sharpener. Cook’s Illustrated also names this professional-grade electric model as the top pick in the category, and I’ve used a similar model, the 1520, to great satisfaction on my heavy Wüsthof chef’s knife and cheap paring knives for six or seven years now. (The fact is, Chef’sChoice dominates the high-quality sharpener market.)
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
I bought this and Unimi's 600/1000 whetstone at the same time. Curiously, reviews are currently blocked for their 600/1000 model, as amazon wouldn't let me leave one for it. Considering the conspicuous absence of reviews in the other stone's listing, one can only assume they're being censored for everyone. So, maybe I should be more critical of these stones, and use them a while longer before giving them any praise? But I've had a very positive experience with them so far, and the 600/1000 stone was the one I found most useful.
Knives can last a long time, provided they are properly maintained. Cleaning, polishing, and oiling your knife all contribute to the longevity of the blade. Sharpen your knives frequently. I'm sure you have heard the saying, a dull knife is more dangerous than a sharp one. If you are uncertain as to how to test if you blade is dull, there are a number of tests you can perform.
This Linkyo’s suction cup feet will hold it still atop any counter. Its auto-stop function will turn the machine off if you press downward with the blade or if the blade itself is too heavy. This wonderful safety feature will keep the machine from jamming and ruining your knives. Also impressive is its special catch basin which makes cleanup much easier as it catches any metal shards or shavings that come off your blade.

If you want to skip the learning curve entirely and save some money at the same time, one of the best knife sharpeners we found is also one of the cheapest. The design of the AccuSharp 001 Knife and Tool Sharpener (Est. $10) couldn't be simpler: It's nothing but a plastic handle with a slot containing a tiny, replaceable tungsten carbide sharpening surface. You place the knife to be sharpened on a table, blade up, and position the AccuSharp over the knife blade. Then you apply light pressure as you pull the AccuSharp along the length of the blade.
I haven't been able to find a decent, low priced knife sharpener since I bought my Wusthof knives. Until now! I decided that this was the last low price sharpening alternative I would try. I mean, for around $13, if it didn't work, I wouldn't be out that much. Man this thing is awesome! Seriously, it's easy to use and really tiny so it's not taking up any room. Most importantly though, it really sharpened my knives right up and took no time at all. I read some reviews where they talked about the metal shavings. It seemed to pull a lot of shavings off the first time I used it, but the 2nd time it was a lot less. I haven't tried on my serrated knives yet but I trust it will work fine. Even sharpened my steak knives with it. I also really like the fact that before it was delivered, the manufacturer reached out to me with a small instruction manual and then followed up with me after I received the product. Bonus: this is a small company so they are working hard for happy customers and I love supporting the little guy! Tips:
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener is specifically designed to handle a wide range of knife and tool sharpening jobs. One of its main features is the precision sharpening guide, which can be adjusted from 15 to 30 degrees. It allows 1 degree increments. These adjustments allow you to sharpen straight bladed and serrated knives, as well as any other blade that you might possess.
You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
Ease of Use – Are you willing to take the time to learn to properly sharpen your knife? When looking for a sharpener, you should remember that some of these products are capable of operating for you, while others require a little bit more effort. If you’re not willing to put in the effort, you should rely on devices that are effortless, such as electric and pull-through models. Knife sharpening systems are fairly easy to use, as well!

These devices work in a very similar manner as the sharpening stone. In all likelihood, you’ve probably seen a sharpening steel, at some point or another. The actual sharpening portion of the item is attached to a handle. These products are much more suitable for honing, since they don’t remove much material from the blade itself. Although it isn’t sufficient for rectifying a dull knife, it is good for honing!


Electric knife sharpeners are undoubtedly beneficial and very effective, but they also come with a few more concerns. This is the case, because they’re equipped with so many additional components. The internal motor is one such component. With this in mind, it is essential to explore all of the characteristics of each sharpener, before you make your decision. Below, you will find a breakdown of each of these for your convenience.
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Sharp knives make the culinary world go round but finding the best knife sharpener isn’t as simple as walking into the store (do people still walk into stores?) and grabbing the first sharpener that presents itself. There are different types of electric sharpeners, some that are straightforward and some whose sharpening process involves as many as 3 or 4 stages. If you’re looking to keep things simple by using a sharpening stone well, there are 3 different types of them as well – oil, water and diamond – and they each have their pros and cons. So it can be confusing.
Whetstones may be natural or artificial stones. Artificial stones usually come in the form of a bonded abrasive composed of a ceramic such as silicon carbide (carborundum) or of aluminium oxide (corundum). Bonded abrasives provide a faster cutting action than natural stones. They are commonly available as a double-sided block with a coarse grit on one side and a fine grit on the other enabling one stone to satisfy the basic requirements of sharpening. Some shapes are designed for specific purposes such as sharpening scythes, drills or serrations.[9]
Despite their name, sharpening steels don’t sharpen knives in actual sense. Their main job is honing a knife blade. However, certain styles or cuts can perform some minor sharpening. You should note that steels that sharpen knives should not be used in place of normal sharpeners. The most common types of cuts include diamond, regular, ceramic or combination. The differences in these cuts are subtle. The choice of cuts depends on what you want to achieve with the honing steel, as well as your budget

From the look of it, one can easily tell that it is designed to deliver the user comfort when using it, safety and great results. The knife sharpener is made of quality ABS material that does not rust. The base is flattened, and it is non-slip in nature. The user enjoys two stage sharpening system from this product. This makes it easy to operate and also sharpen the knives. You can use it for steel straight blade kitchen knives.
Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
With this Edge Grip Bottom, you can place it on the edge of the countertop and you can sharpen the knife by pulling it from heel to tip through the slots. This bottom also lets you just place it on top of the countertop, but at least you have options to choose from. The non-slip material at the bottom makes sure that everything’s is safe and secure when you begin your sharpening process. And it also comes with a non-slip rubber grip handle so you can have a secure and firm hold while you sharpen your knives.
Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
If you have the time to commit to a block sharpener, this two-sided King stone should manage to meet your needs. Of those consumers who actually knew how to use this type of sharpener and those who took the time to learn how to use it, the overall consensus was that it is worth its fairly average price. Consumers were most impressed with how well this stone worked when it was wet, but noted that it is also rather useful when dry.
Sharpening by freehand takes time to learn and you need to manage your expectations, as long as your water stones are flat and decent quality you should be able to get a nice edge, soon. A small knife, such as a paring knife is actually a little trickier to sharpen in my opinion so start with an 8″ Chef knife of decent quality. You are probably not reaching the edge of the edge of your knife, and perhaps not raising a burr with the first stone. You need to raise a burr on both sides of the knife before it will get sharp. Paint the edge and bevel with a Sharpie and with gentle pressure try to remove that sharpie mark on the water stone, this will help you hit the target area and remove the fatigued metal. Feel free to email me but there are some good videos out there to guide you as well.
The bottom line, the beauty of this is that the two methods of sharpening complement each other. I believe a good sharpener should have a few tricks up his or her sleeve, those tricks could consist of skill with a guided device, with freehand sharpening and perhaps with a belt sander for those major repair jobs. Just today I had a knife that would have been quite difficult to sharpen freehand due to the blades profile. With the Edge Pro I was able to create a wonderful edge without any difficulty at all, much sharper than new in fact.
It has amazing features that make it the go-to product. These include triple action, professional results, and effectiveness. It works well on blunt knives that can be annoying making them very sharp in just minutes. The design of this knife sharpener makes it comfortable to use and able to complement any kitchen. This knife sharpener is very budget friendly due to the price that it comes in. It has three slots that perform different functions according to the blade that needs to be sharpened.
Ceramic whetstones are meant to be used without water or oil, which means they can be used almost anywhere and are ideal for chefs or cooks who have limited working spaces. They will give you a very sharp blade and as their surface is very hard they will maintain their flat surfaces over the long-term, but as they have a fine grit, they can break if you drop the stone.

Be aware that few sharpeners of any type can properly sharpen serrated knives; that’s a job best left to a professional, so we didn’t knock points off our test models if they lacked the capability. Luckily, serrated knives tend to stay sharp for years and years, since it’s the teeth (rather than the edge) that do most of the work. For this review we focused on the sort of knives that sharpeners are designed for: those with standard, straight-edged blades, such as paring and chef’s knives.
At the end of the day, there are hundreds of different products that could very well be the best knife sharpener. Of course, it is vital to remember that one knife sharpener might be the best for one consumer, but it might not be the best for you! Therefore, it is absolutely vital to take the time to read a handful of knife sharpener reviews and know your needs. By doing this, you will have a much easier time choosing the very best sharpener for your own individualized preferences!
As Mal Knives shows in a review, the Chef's Choice sharpener creates a triple bevel on the blade, which allows it to work with both Asian and European/American knives. The bevels are at roughly 25 degrees, 20 degrees, and 15 degrees. This triple bevel design increases the length of time required between sharpenings. However, one Amazon customer reviewer disliked the sharpening results on Asian knives with this machine.
Most sharpening stones are made of aluminum oxide, Novaculite, and silicon carbide. They are commonly known as India, Arkansas and Crystolon stones. Crystolon and India are man made while Arkansas stones are natural. Arkansas stones have a fine to coarse texture while India stones are preferred for fine sharpening. Crystolon are mainly used for initial coarse sharpening. Some sharpening stones are mixed with diamond abrasives to produce the optimal cutting edge.

I've had this for a while now, about 6 months. It works like a charm. I have a Victorinox chef's knife, it was getting pretty beat up and dull. It took a few times to get the blade to stay sharp, again because of how beat up it was. Now it stays sharp through just about anything. I run it through the AccuSharp about once a week to maintain the blade. I can go from cutting raw sweet potatoes to thin slicing tomatoes. I use my knife daily. The other day on a whim I used the AccuSharp on a Ginsu (don't judge me) Santoku knife to see if it could redeem it. It took quite a few passes, but it did actually help. I thought it was beyond hope and it was left in the drawer forgotten. There is a major nick still, but it is actually usable now. I've used it to sharpen those cheap little paring knives too. So far it's worked on every blade we've put it to. We recently gave one to my father in law and he went to work sharpening every blade he could find! So be warned, you will go hunting for things to sharpen.
The main drawback to this design is that the heel of the knife doesn't get sharpened because you have to get this thing right on the corner of the heel in order for the whole length of the edge to be sharpened. Since this thing shaves lots of metal off the knife, you end up with a heel that's taller than the rest of the edge, rendering the knife unable to chop properly. Anything attempting to be chopped close to the heel will simply not be chopped. Just dented.
Overall, these systems are highly innovative, effective and can sharpen or hone your blade to perfection. Are they a little more expensive? Yes, but serious knife enthusiasts will find that the extra cost is ultimately worth it for the increased benefits. This doesn’t mean that this type of system will be the right knife sharpener for you though. Instead, you’ll need to know exactly how and how often you will be using the sharpener, before you make your decision.
This sharpener includes five different sharpening stones along with a knife clamp that holds the knife during sharpening, and a guide that allows you to select the proper blade angle. Honing oil is also included. The stones have finger grips for a secure hold and are color coded so you know which are coarser and which are finer. Unlike traditional whetstones, with this system the knife remains still while you move the stones along the blade. This manual system allows you to sharpen knives at four different angles, but requires some practice to become comfortable with the technique.
The paper test - Remove your knife from the sharpener. Grab a piece of notebook paper and hold it vertically in your hand so that one edge is facing straight up. Now take the knife and push it down against this edge. If the blade cuts through without hesitation it’s sharp. If the paper simply crumples beneath the blade instead of cutting the blade needs a bit more work.
The cost of the most basic Wicked Edge package is about $300 plus $65 for a base to mount the system to (otherwise you’ll mount it directly to a table or bench). The basic package is great but if you can afford a little more I recommend getting the Pro-Pack II upgrade kit at $150 as that contains the micro adjustable arms shown in my run down of how to use the system. An Angle Cube is also a worthwhile investment generally running around $30 on Amazon. Finally, I would recommend getting the 600 / 1000 diamond stones and the 14 / 10-micron leather strops at a minimum. This would bring the total cost of the recommended kit to about $655 dollars. Yes, it’s a lot of money but if you’re serious about your knives it becomes a no-brainer.
If you have both western and Japanese style knives, it’s important to know that electric knife sharpeners such as the Chef's Choice 1520 Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener are able to adjust between the fifteen-degree edge for Japanese style knives and the twenty-degree edge for western style knives at the flip of a switch. This can save you money and counter space.

Best purchase I every made. while my knife doesnt cut a fine layer of tomato without touching it, it became as good as it was when I purchased. I recommend users to learn how to properly sharpen the knife. It took me about 30 minutes to sharpen a single knife to what it is today. The knife gets really sharp. Also, with use, the surface gets uneven. I recommend you draw a grid in pencil and then file using the grinder stone until the grids disappear. This ensures the surface remains flat during all use.


“This is the second knife sharpener I’ve purchased, and this one was a gift to my dad who was frequently using mine. I love this knife sharpener, as does he. We’ve both used it with great success on knives and blades — from pocket knives, scissors, kitchen knives, lawn-mower blades, to axes and hatchets, and I’m sure I’m forgetting things. Point is: We both use these knife sharpeners frequently, and they live up to the infomercial hype in my opinion.”
After spending more than 10 hours digging, cutting, and scooping dirt with 24 models, we found that the Wilcox 14” Garden Trowel is the best garden trowel for most gardeners. The single-piece, stainless steel Wilcox’s edge and shape penetrates the soil better than any other trowel, its wide blade scoops more soil than any soil knife, and it’s nearly indestructible.
Whichever method you choose, be it a waterstone (also known as a whetstone), or a pull-through (either V-shaped or ceramic wheels) it's important to regularly hone your knife with a honing steel, which we'll also cover below. You'll be pleased to hear that you won't have to reach for the stones too regularly – once every two or three months should suffice. 
This article is not about how to sharpen a knife, check this article instead, but briefly, a coarse stone is critical, it has the potential to raise a Burr quickly and make a dull knife sharp quickly. The correct use of pressure enables us to form a burr, remove the burr and then do some coarse stone refinement and thus create a very sharp knife. This sensation is motivation, it is a confidence builder and will enhance your sharpening experience, so believe me when I say that a coarse stone is your first priority. I recommend a 400, 600 or 800 grit. After that, depending on the knives you are sharpening strive to obtain stone combination, such as a 400 – 1,000 – 5,000 grit three stone combination is going to allow you to achieve knives sharper than most people have ever seen.
If you are a fan of matching your small appliances and gadgetry to your interior décor you will be quite pleased to hear that this sharpener is available in three different colors – black, lime green, and red. That being said, I don’t think it should be all that important, considering that this sharpener is so small it can easily be tossed in a drawer or backpack for safe keeping.
Actually, the company contacted me to make sure I received the stones and that I was happy with them. Excellent service. The stones are great! I'm pretty much a novice so the clear instructions that came with the stones and the eBook instructions were wonderful. The eBook had quality pictures demonstrating the use of the stones and the written instructions were clear and to the point. Within minutes of opening the box I had the stones figured out and sharpening my AF survival knife, my pocket knife and a couple of my wife's kitchen knives...which included a very expensive chef's knife. Very satisfied with this product and highly recommend it.
The type and size of the blade being sharpened determines the size of the stone needed. In general , a 6" stone is considered a small sharpening stone, an 8" stone is a common larger size, and a stone larger than 8" (10"-12" are available) is considered generously sized. Stones smaller than 6" (3" and 4" stones are quite common), are considered pocket stones and can be used for toolboxes, tackle boxes and on-the-go sharpening, but are generally not recommended for regular sharpening jobs.
This Chef Sharp manual knife sharpener is made to sit solidly on your countertop or whatever workspace you like. Its soft, rubbery bottom provides the perfect non-slip surface no matter what type of material you are working on. The smoothest of countertops will be no match for this sharpener, it will stay perfectly still as you work. To offer extra stability and support, this sharpener also includes a horizontal steel handle. Holding onto this handle will not only help to keep your sharpener steady, it will also keep you steady as you draw your blade through either of the two sharpening slots.

To answer an obvious question: The difference between 15 degrees and 12 degrees is so slight that a 15-degree sharpener is fine for both kinds of bevels. So if a dedicated 15-degree sharpener is all you need (that is, if you own only Asian or post-2011 European knives), we have good news: Chef’sChoice makes the otherwise identical Pronto 463, which contains a single Asian-style sharpening slot. (For the testers at Cook’s Illustrated, the Pronto 463 is the top choice among manual sharpeners.) And if you own older European knives exclusively, the company sells a dedicated 20-degree model, the Pronto 464.
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