Using the strength of industrial high precision superior mono-crystalline diamonds, Diamond Machining Technology (DMT) have created a durable longer-lasting flat sharpening surface that will efficiently sharpen, hone, deburr and polish almost any type of knife or cutting tool. The DMT set contains 3 one-sided whetstones that have extra-fine, fine, and coarse grits which means you have a complete sharpening system at your fingertips.
As long as you keep your hand on the base, outside the rods, they do double-duty as safety rails to keep the knife edge away from your hand. It usually takes about 20 passes on each side to sharpen a blade, although you may need to repeat the process with both the medium- and fine-grit sharpening rods. Rods with very fine grit are also available, and hardcore sharpening enthusiasts like that you can flip the base over and insert the rods so they lay almost flush to the base, letting you use them like flat sharpening stones for really beat-up blades. Users also appreciate the Spyderco Sharpmaker's durability, with most saying their first model lasted for several decades of use before wearing out.
Why is this one of the best sharpeners? It is extremely versatile and can be used for various applications. It works for regular blades, serrated blades and even Asian Kataba blades, which only have one side of edge! This makes the product exceptional for kitchen usage. The durable construction and 3-year warranty offers even more peace of mind for a better overall investment. 
I've only used it to touch up the edge on an ESEE RB3 and a pocket folder so far, but it has done very nicely for those tasks. I found that using the rounded edge works best for me in order to be able to run the length of the blade without hitting the leather lanyard. I'll hopefully try it out soon on fish hooks, too. A worthy and handy accessory, and cool looking necklace, to boot!
The double sided 400 and 1000-grit Water Stone Sharpening Block by Whetstone enables you to safely and easily sharpen and polish your kitchen cutlery, hunting or pocket knives, blades and razors. You can even use it for your gardening tools! This stone only requires water, no oil needed! Made with durable green silicon carbide, this honing tool will last for years to come.
Not sure why I bought this item and then I received it. It has a bit of a 'cool' factor and is well made. I took the sharp edges of the stone as they were a bit uncomfortable on my chest but have since been wearing it a lot. Used it to put an edge on some workmates knives and to tickle up my own daily use knife. I like it, it is a bit different and useful.
Most users say that the Spyderco Sharpmaker is easy to use, even if its instruction manual can be a little confusing at first. But if you're not comfortable with its relatively open mechanics, consider our best-reviewed knife sharpening kit, the Lansky Professional Sharpening System (Est. $55). This system comes with a clamp that secures the knife blade, four grits of hones from coarse/grinding to ultra-fine, and a triangle-shaped hone for sharpening serrated blades. You attach a guide rod to each hone, then slide the guide rod into a hole on the clamp. Which hole you choose sets the angle for the sharpening: 17, 20, 25 or 30 degrees. Once the guide rod is in place, you swing the hone repeatedly across the edge of the blade at the pre-set angle; anywhere from six to 20 passes with each hone will do the job.

The sharpener has come a long way in the past couple of thousand years and yet it hasn’t. That is, while there have been incredible advances in the development of mechanical knife sharpeners the classic and very ancient sharpening stone is still with us and very much in use as you read this. The best knife sharpener for you will be one that meets the needs of your cuisine and your temperament but which, first and foremost, reliably produces the sharp knives (look after your knife!) you need with the least hassle.


When the stone is intended for use on a flat surface, it is called a Bench Stone. On the other hand, small, portable, hand-held stones are referred to as Pocket Stones. Also, because Pocket Stones are smaller than Bench Stones, they are more easily transported but, they also present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and even pressure when attempting to sharpen longer blades. Consequently, Bench Stones are commonly used at home or in camp whereas, Pocket Stones are generally reserved for honing an edge in the field.
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