Users say it usually takes five to six strokes to get a good edge on a blade that's in decent shape, and that the Chef's Choice ProntoPro's large handle is easy for everyone to hold onto, including men with large hands or those with decreased grip strength. What it won't do, however, is rehabilitate a truly damaged or nicked blade -- for that, you need one of the other manual knife sharpeners that we've already mentioned.

The ceramic stones really bring an edge out and set the stage for the leather strops. The 1200 / 1600 stones are the ones that do the most in my opinion as they refine the edge and allow it to take a nice mirror once the leather strops are applied. I use the super fine 1.4 / .6 micron ceramics to really polish and remove scratches from the diamond stones. The only downside is they are the most expensive stones at about $120 so unless you are very serious about a mirror edge you can skip these.


Sharpening kits or systems can be manual or electric. They tend to require more time and effort than other simple sharpeners, and you always have to pass a learning curve before you can properly sharpen your knives without causing damages on the blades. A good sharpening kit is totally worth it though: once you’ve mastered the technique, your blades can have even keener and sharper edges than when they’re fresh out of the factory.
Once you've sharpened one side, you need to flip over, but don't swap the hand gripping the blade – think of it a bit like going backhand with a tennis racket (see above). Lead with the heel this time, rather then with the blade, but repeat the process in three parts. After five strokes on each third of the blade, it's time to check your knife. It's not an exact science, and it all depends on how blunt your blade was to start with (mine was very blunt indeed). But if you sharpen fairly regularly, it should just take a few strokes. 

I’ve been sharpening knives for over 35 years. I have owned an Edge Pro Professional version for several years and I have sharpened thousands of knives with it. I have sharpened thousands of knives freehand as well. This is something I have pondered over for many years: Nobody is paying me to say what I say, sharpening knives is the most important thing in my life, therefore, I am qualified to express my opinion… “what’s the best knife sharpener?” Read on!
If you are looking for a knife sharpener that is easy to use, reliable, affordable and compact, then you should consider this one. This amazing knife sharpener, comes with all the attributes, features and qualities needed to sharpen every knife, regardless of how dull it is. It is designed to sharpen and maintain all types of kitchen knives. It is made of carbide and ceramic, which gives a fine grip on various surfaces. It performs exemplary on straight edge blades. It is easy and comfortable to use.
I bet those Vikings, relatives of mine no doubt, never had it so good. They never had surated blades to sharpen or needed to wear cool things around their necks to woo the women (they just grabbed them by the hair I guess). I love my stone. So useful and beautiful. I always have spit to wet it with, and I always have a way to sharpen my tool. Wazoo makes high quality products. I give them the highest rating I have. Dudes!
The Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 is our overall pick among knife sharpeners. A manual model, it was the easiest of all our test models to use—almost intuitive, in fact: You insert the blade in one of the slots and run it back and forth, from heel to tip, until the tool grinds a new edge. The sharpening elements are wheels impregnated with diamond abrasive—a material that Cook’s Illustrated found to be superior (subscription required) to ceramics in both sharpening speed and lack of friction. In our test, about 30 strokes on the coarse wheels under light pressure cut a brand-new edge. Another 20 strokes on the fine, polishing wheels gave the edge a reasonably smooth finish.
The double sided 400 and 1000-grit Water Stone Sharpening Block by Whetstone enables you to safely and easily sharpen and polish your kitchen cutlery, hunting or pocket knives, blades and razors. You can even use it for your gardening tools! This stone only requires water, no oil needed! Made with durable green silicon carbide, this honing tool will last for years to come.
As with all motorized Chef ’s Choice sharpeners, the 702 will handle steel kitchen knives. However, it also will put the same quality edge on any ceramic kitchen blade. Employing advanced diamond abrasive technology, the 702 features two sharpening slots that hold the knives at pre-set angles, optimized for the best edge on both ceramic and steel blades. Turn the motor on and, using a steady drawing motion, pull the blade through each slot.
The iconic Wiltshire Stay Sharp Knives have been in homes since 1938, and are known and  trusted for their self-sharpening mechanism, as well as providing good quality durable knives. The Wiltshire Mulit-Purpose knife is ideal for slicing and spreading. The wavy serrations on the blade slice bread & tomatoes without tearing with its high quality stainless steel blade. Scabbard sharpens and hones the knife each time the knife is removed, while the triple rivet handle provides strength and durability. The coloured trim is perfect for quick identification in the drawer. The locking system ensures the knife is securely held in place, and has a safety lock button to release the knife.
A: You can sharpen your knives by hand using a stone or you can use a manual powered 1-stage, 2-stage or 3-stage sharpener or you can use a multi-stage electric powered sharpener. The choice is yours. Many people prefer not just the affordability but the precise control they have with an oil or water stone. While others opt for the more predictable results they get from an electric powered sharpener. It’s really a matter of taste.
Remember, we humans are pretty nifty sometimes. I found that my muscle memory was providing me with the opportunity to create edges that really forced me to compare with the edges off of the Edge Pro. It came to me that the Edge Pro had made me a better freehand sharpener, My confidence level had been boosted and with knives to sharpen daily, I was getting more comfortable with sharpening freehand every day, I was improving. That was about four years ago, what about today.

So, we have the human component versus the human component using a sharpening system like the Edge Pro. Here is the question that I have asked myself a hundred times and undoubtedly this question has come up over and over in the multitude of sharpening forums… Given two identical knives, can a human make the knife as sharp as someone using the Edge Pro?
The following are my personal favourites and they are all synthetic stones, I do have experience with natural what stones but lets keep it simple, lets stick to synthetic water stones. Believe me, some of the world sharpest knives are sharpened solely on synthetic stones. Here are my personal favourites, I use these water stones every day and the order is not necessarily in priority, they are all good.
Budo's sharpening stone is an excellent buy. The 1000 and 4000 grit stone is a good mix for sharpening everyday household knives. The alignment tool also helps a person hold a knife at the proper angle so that they don't inadvertently flatten the edge and dull the blade. The stone has a rubber seat so that it doesn't slide within its bamboo stand. The only negatives are that detailed instructions are not included with the packaging, however, a link is sent to your e-mail address but that doesn't help if it's a gift. Also the tool doesn't work well with short knives like a paring knife. Lastly, the 1000/4000 stone isn't quite suitable for professional level knifeware but Budo does sell higher grit sharpening stones.

Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for Clauss DualDrive is the first non-chuckable sharpener for both #2 and carpenter pencils. Just use with your current bit on the fly. Manual or power-driven design evenly sharpens. Integrated shaving reservoir with see-through window. Features high carbon steel blades and a lifetime warranty.  More + Product Details Close
‡‡Shipping fees apply. Shipping fees and delivery times vary depending on location, size and weight of the item(s) and is only available within the province of the Canadian Tire retail location (“Store”) from which the item(s) was purchased. Bulk items will only be delivered within a 100km radius of the Store. Not available in Recontre East, NL. Conditions and restrictions apply. Visit https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/deliver-to-home.html for more information.

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The Cordless Knife & Tool Sharpener represents a new step for Smith’s Products. While the company has sold and continues to sell electric sharpeners, this is the first time it has offered a powered abrasive-belt unit. Moreover, Smith’s added an extra twist by making it cordless and rechargeable. A pivoting head enables the unit not only to sharpen knives, but other cutting and digging tools such as axes, hedge clippers, bypass pruners, shovels and more. It comes with three interchangeable belts in coarse (80), medium (220) and fine (600) grits.
This knife sharpener has three sharpening slots with three different cutting materials: tungsten carbide, ceramic, and diamond. The diamond slot is used for ceramic knives, while the other two slots for sharpening and honing steel knives. This can also sharpen serrated knives. This sharpener is easy to use and has a handle that keeps your hand safely away from the knife blade.
The Fallkniven DC3 Diamond/Ceramic Whetstone Sharpener will make a believer out of anyone willing to invest a bit of time in the process. A big advantage of this stone is that it can be taken anywhere, used anywhere, without any form of lubrication and will produce an amazing sharp edge on whatever needs sharpening. Timeless Old World tech that still dazzles.

Overall, users say the Sharpmaker offers reliable, hard-to-beat results with a reasonable learning curve, and they're happy that, unlike traditional flat stones, you don't have to wet or oil the sharpening rods before use. They also say the Sharpmaker makes it easier to maintain a good angle than flat sharpening stones. Users warn that you do, however, need to scrub the stones periodically with an abrasive cleanser like Comet or Ajax to remove any lingering particles of steel. They also warn to be careful about not dragging the point of the knife across the stones as this will quickly dull it.

Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
Step 3 is to use lots of water, while rubbing the water stone over top of the lapping plate. Running tap water will be your best option, but if this option is not available you will need to keep the stone plentifully saturated with water. Make sure that you use random circular motions, while covering the stone’s surface completely. Randomly wash away the abrasive material, if you are not using running tap water, because you do not want it to interfere with the flattening process. You can pick up the water stone to see if the lines are wearing away, which they should, if you are doing the process correctly. Of course, the lines on the outside edges will wear away first, because they are higher than the center portion of the water stone.
As mentioned, hand-sharpening knives is by no means an easy task to get right. It requires investment in a set of stones of varying coarseness, patience, and lots of practice. In fact, a lot of people end up damaging a knife or two while learning the process, so its good not to start training on your finest European blade. With the advent of high-quality electric options, though, that learning curve is effectively eliminated.

The product has a 2-stage sharpening system, which ensures that all of your blades will be sharpened perfectly. Take note that this specific sharpener does not offer angles! It is only useable with straight edges! Still, the product is super easy to use, inexpensive and will sharpen your blades perfectly. With that, the product is definitely one of the best knife sharpeners for kitchen knives!


Stone: With a sharpening stone, you'll drag the blade of the knife across the rough surface of the stone. Sharpening stones consist of a number of types of material, such as diamond stones, oil stones (also called Arkansas stones), water stones (or aluminum oxide stones), and ceramic stones. Yes, the diamond stone actually contains tiny fragments of diamonds, but it's a little heavy to wear as an earring. The trick with a sharpening stone becomes applying the right amount of pressure and sharpening at the proper angle because using a sharpening stone requires a completely manual process with no guide slots. However, stones can sharpen many tools, including scissors and chisels.
If I am to be completely honest, I must tell you that I actually came extremely close to selecting another manual sharpener for this position. I thought it looked wonderful. It had all the specifications I would hope for in a manual knife sharpener and then some. It boasted the ability to sharpen at two different angles (15 degrees and 20 degrees) and included a honing feature. It looked solidly built. It used diamonds to grind the blades down. It sounded perfect and I almost selected it, until I read the consumer reviews. The consumer reviews for that apparently perfect manual knife sharpener were abysmal.

There are several complications that will be present if you have a dull knife. First, the knife’s blade will become slightly ineffective. The level of effectiveness will be determined by the dullness of the blade. If you have allowed it to dull significantly, the blade might not even make the necessary cut! In the same sense, the knife will become a little more dangerous when the blade has been dulled. So, how can you tell if the blade is dull?
To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.
If there is one thing I would change on my Eversharp, it would be the length of the cord. It’s about a 3-foot cord, and that works fine if I put it on the counter near the plug. But that’s not where I would like it to be because the food processor is there, or the blender. I’d like to keep it on the island instead of making room for it every time. But that’s a small complaint.
Throughout the years, knives have been used for an assortment of different purposes. Some have been able to use these blades to save their lives while others use them for more practical purposes, such as cutting through cardboard, at work and obviously in kitchens. In order for the knife to be completely effective, it is vital for the blade to be sharpened! Of course, this presents somewhat of a problem for newbies to the trade. With this in mind, you will want to read the comprehensive guide below, and pick up some pointers to find the best knife sharpener for you.
The thing is, sharpening knives using the popular and traditional sharpening stone method can be very difficult. Many cooks spend years of careful practice perfecting this skill. However, barring a prodigy-level ability to quickly master this ancient technique, there are other options, such as professional sharpening services. But it does generally take multiple knives to get various jobs done, and the $1-$2/inch prices from these craftsmen can add up quickly, especially if you have a lot of dull knives.
Ease of use – Most people in search of a mechanical sharpener want one because they don’t want to be bothered with trying to achieve a perfect edge themselves using a stick or sharpening stone. They want predictable, first class results every time. In that case it’s important that the electric powered device is easy to use, achieves results quickly and with little effort and is designed with user safety in mind. Keep in mind too that it’s easy to apply too much pressure when using a mechanical sharpener and when that happens you’re likely to see unsatisfactory results. In addition there are subtle differences between mechanical devices designed for Asian-style knives and those designed for Western-style knives. This has to do with the sharpening angle discussed above. Don’t get an Asian sharpener if you don’t need precise control over your cuts.
Another benefit of the Wicked Edge system is that it has two sets of stones, one for each side of the knife. This allows both sides of the knife to be sharpened simultaneously unlike the Edge-Pro Apex and the Lansky systems. The stones that Wicked Edge utilizes are also diamond stones with the basic kits coming with 100, 200, 400, and 600 grit. The utilization of diamond stones allows even the toughest of steels to be sharpened relatively easily (it took me 25 minutes to sharpen a Spyderco ZDP-189 blade at 64.5 Rockwell!).
This is a great sharpener for budget conscious cooks. You can use it with equal facility whether you’re right or left handed, it has a convenient finger guard to cut down on accidents and most important, it only takes a few swipes on a regular basis to keep your knives in tip-top condition. It’s not glamorous. It won’t add anything substantive to your kitchen decor. But it will ensure your knives are always ready for whatever dish you have in mind.
Clamp-style sharpening tools use a clamp with several holes with predefined angles. The stone is mounted on a rod and is pulled through these holes, so that the angle remains consistent. Another system is the crock stick setup, where two sticks are put into a plastic or wooden base to form a V shape. When the knife is pulled up the V, the angle is held so long as the blade is held perpendicular to the base. Several cutlery manufacturers now offer electric knife sharpeners with multiple stages with at least one grinding stage. These electric sharpeners are typically used in the kitchen but have the ability to sharpen blades such as pocket or tactical knives. The main benefit of using an electric sharpener is speed with many models that can complete the sharpening process in one to two minutes. The disadvantage is that the sharpening angle is fixed so some specialized knives, like a Japanese style Santoku, may need additional attention to sharpen to the ideal angle.

Modern synthetic stones are generally of equal quality to natural stones, and are often considered superior in sharpening performance due to consistency of particle size and control over the properties of the stones. For example, the proportional content of abrasive particles as opposed to base or "binder" materials can be controlled to make the stone cut faster or slower, as desired.[7] Natural stones are often prized for their natural beauty as stones and their rarity, adding value as collectors' items. Furthermore, each natural stone is different, and there are rare natural stones that contain abrasive particles in grit sizes finer than are currently available in artificial stones.[citation needed]

When attempting to choose a whetstone for sharpening your favorite knife, the number of choices can be mind boggling. In fact, sharpening stones are divided into four distinct categories consisting of natural whetstones and manufactured whetstones which, in turn, are divided into two other categories consisting of oil stones and water stones. Then, there are numerous different varieties of natural whetstones consisting of several different materials that are quarried from different places around the world as well as several different types of man-made whetstones!

Different knives are sharpened differently according to grind (edge geometry) and application. For example, surgical scalpels are extremely sharp but fragile, and are generally disposed of, rather than sharpened, after use. Straight razors used for shaving must cut with minimal pressure, and thus must be very sharp with a small angle and often a hollow grind. Typically these are stropped daily or more often. Kitchen knives are less sharp, and generally cut by slicing rather than just pressing, and are steeled daily. At the other extreme, an axe for chopping wood will be less sharp still, and is primarily used to split wood by chopping, not by slicing, and may be reground but will not be sharpened daily. In general, but not always, the harder the material to be cut, the higher (duller) the angle of the edge.
I understand that I am missing some items here but that’s not important, most people will make up their own minds on what method of sharpening is best for them. In my dream sharpening setup, I would have all my water stones, the Edge Pro Professional and the Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener. If the most important thing to you is making your knives sharp and you just don’t think you will have the time or patience to learn to free hand sharpen that the Edge Pro Apex is likely perfect for you.
Learning sharpening technique requires focus even without worrying about the stone itself. Stones that require frequent flattening, soaking and cleaning, or that take a long time to create an edge can be a source of frustration to some beginning sharpeners. Keep in mind your willingness perform regular maintenance when choosing a starting set of stones.
The Brød & Taylor Pocket Knife Sharpener (which is no longer available) uses the same carbide stones as the full-size model noted above, and it sharpens and hones just as well. It would make a solid, pocketable tool for campers, hunters, and anglers. But this compact model is not stable enough for long or heavy kitchen knives, and you can’t engage the spring-loaded arms in order to use a polishing function.
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