Wicked Edge is unique as it has a vise in the center to clamp the knife and on either side there are two arms with sharpening guides attached. These arms and guides allow you to precisely control the exact angle you want your knife to be sharpened at. The cool thing about this is once you have set the angles and sharpened the knife it’s 100% repeatable when it comes time to touch up again and very, very accurate.
I haven't been able to find a decent, low priced knife sharpener since I bought my Wusthof knives. Until now! I decided that this was the last low price sharpening alternative I would try. I mean, for around $13, if it didn't work, I wouldn't be out that much. Man this thing is awesome! Seriously, it's easy to use and really tiny so it's not taking up any room. Most importantly though, it really sharpened my knives right up and took no time at all. I read some reviews where they talked about the metal shavings. It seemed to pull a lot of shavings off the first time I used it, but the 2nd time it was a lot less. I haven't tried on my serrated knives yet but I trust it will work fine. Even sharpened my steak knives with it. I also really like the fact that before it was delivered, the manufacturer reached out to me with a small instruction manual and then followed up with me after I received the product. Bonus: this is a small company so they are working hard for happy customers and I love supporting the little guy! Tips:
That’s a pity, because the merits of a sharp knife become apparent the moment you swipe through an onion with one. It’s pure pleasure. A sharp knife cuts easily and precisely, requiring little more pressure than the knife’s own weight to do the job.  By the end of this project, I was used to working with truly sharp knives. From now on, that’s how I’ll be keeping mine, and I hope to help you put aside your qualms and make knife sharpening part of your routine, too. Of course, that means you’ll need a knife sharpener—the question is, which one?
For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)
Diamond hones are made from very small, industrial grade, diamonds adhered to the face of a metal or plastic plate. Also, because Diamonds are so much harder than any of the other sharpening materials, they tend to cut very fast and last much longer than the other whetstone materials. But, they are also often more expensive to purchase. In addition, Diamond Stones generally consist of three different styles consisting of a solid metal plate coated with an adhesive and diamond dust with holes in the plate to allow the swarf to escape, a solid plate without holes for sharpening tools with corners that might catch in the holes, and a plastic plate with islands of exposed plastic interspersed with the adhesive and diamond dust to act as a lubricant.
The manual Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener was the most distinctive tool in our test. Unlike the rest of the models we tried, it employs the V-notch system in which you “carve” a new edge on sharpened tungsten-carbide stones. As noted above, typically you can find such systems in cheap one-step sharpeners that have a deserved reputation for removing too much metal from blades and producing wavy edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. And going into our test, we were skeptical. However, thanks to clever and precise engineering, the Brød & Taylor model produced an excellent edge. It allowed us to hone and polish that edge simply by changing the angle of the blade, producing a sharp, even, stable, and durable edge that nearly matched that from our upgrade pick, the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV.
A great sharpener for all your kitchen knives the CS2 also makes a smart addition to the gear when you’re going away on a family camping trip. It will also do a bang-up job on your hunting, pocket, boning knife and more. As mentioned it does require just a bit of getting used to in order to achieve optimal results but nothing too involved. A simple, effective, no-frills sharpener.

★ SHARPEN ANY EDGE – THE PERFECT GIFT – Our professional grade knife sharpener doesn’t only work its magic on Kitchen and Chef Knives, its versatility extends to virtually any blade! Sharpen Fillet Knives, Sushi Knives, Pruners, Straight Razor Blades, Scissors, Chisels, Pocket Knives, Axes, and Hunting Knives! With so many of these things used in our daily lives, it makes a thoughtful gift for any family member or friend.


A: Like cars, knife sharpeners run the gamut from basic to luxury and like cars the price can vary from extremely affordable to more than some people might want to spend. You can get a high quality sharpener that will put your knives through a 2 or 3-stage process which will result in an incredibly sharp edge for less than $20. Or you can buy a mechanical sharpener that will produce a virtually flawless edge for $200+.


Manual sharpeners fall into two basic categories: those that use a V-shaped cutting notch, often made of ultrahard tungsten carbide, to carve a new edge onto a blade, and those that use fixed or rotating abrasive elements (either an abrasive ceramic or diamond-impregnated steel) to grind a new edge. In general you get what you pay for with both kinds. Cheap models under $20 get a lot of complaints about sharpening performance, ergonomics, and durability. Move into the $40 to $50 range, and you begin to see more solid results. The cheap V-notch sharpeners, in particular, get terrible marks from most knowledgeable reviewers; such models remove huge amounts of metal, rapidly wearing knives into toothpicks, and they leave uneven edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. (I used one of these for about a week in the ranch kitchen and can attest to their awfulness.) However, as you’ll see below, when done right a V-notch sharpener is an attractive option.
Budo's sharpening stone is an excellent buy. The 1000 and 4000 grit stone is a good mix for sharpening everyday household knives. The alignment tool also helps a person hold a knife at the proper angle so that they don't inadvertently flatten the edge and dull the blade. The stone has a rubber seat so that it doesn't slide within its bamboo stand. The only negatives are that detailed instructions are not included with the packaging, however, a link is sent to your e-mail address but that doesn't help if it's a gift. Also the tool doesn't work well with short knives like a paring knife. Lastly, the 1000/4000 stone isn't quite suitable for professional level knifeware but Budo does sell higher grit sharpening stones.
The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:
Lots of knife enthusiasts swear by a traditional steel for sharpening – but in actual fact this metal rod ‘hones’ a knife, which is essentially realigning the blade and not, strictly speaking, sharpening it. This knife skills video shows you how to use a steel. Whetstones usually come as a flat block of stone, and while they’re very efficient, require a certain amount of skill to use them properly. Hand-held sharpeners are usually small, compact and the best choice for home cooks or beginners – they often come with a safety guard and the wheel action is very intuitive to use. For that reason, we tested handheld sharpeners only. 
The answer to the question of how to choose a single whetstone from among the many is actually one of both purpose and expense. Indeed, as the old adage says: “You get what you pay for” – This is certainly the case with sharpening stones. In fact, as a general rule, a high quality, natural, whetstone is significantly more expensive than a man-made whetstone but, they also tend to produce a noticeably finer edge than man-made stones do. On the other hand, man-made whetstones (with the exception of diamond hones) are very affordable and, just like natural whetstones, they too are available in different grits for different stages in the sharpening process from cutting the initial edge bevel to polishing a finely honed edge.
Not sure why I bought this item and then I received it. It has a bit of a 'cool' factor and is well made. I took the sharp edges of the stone as they were a bit uncomfortable on my chest but have since been wearing it a lot. Used it to put an edge on some workmates knives and to tickle up my own daily use knife. I like it, it is a bit different and useful. 

Oil stones have been around a long time, and while not as popular as in the past, they are still a practical option. Not as fast as the other stones, they are easy to use and their lower price makes them a good value for the budget conscious. With oil stones, the relation of the types and grits can be confusing. Our article, Difference in Sharpening Stone Materials, provides a more in depth explanation, but in general an India stone or two combined with an Arkansas stone is a good combination to start with.

I don’t think we should even wonder what is better for sharpening knives. The Edge Pro or freehand sharpening, both are effective. It just depends on what method not only gives you sharp knives but makes you feel good about yourself when you are done. There are some people who are completely against using any type of Jig and I get that. I did not purchase the Edge Pro because I couldn’t sharpen knives without it, I got it because I am obsessed with knife sharpening and I believed this to be a quality product that sharpened knives well, I have never regretted the purchase.
Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand.
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