I've been using this stone for months and have started to find that, while the fine side does provide a nice sharp edge, the 400gr side is wearing my knives unevenly, which causes me to be unable to finely sharpen the entire length of the blade when moving to the fine side. The logo that is put in the middle of the 400gr side of the knife is causing more material to be removed than the rest of the blade when I'm sweeping across. I even verified this by going straight down the length of the fine side and watching the wear pattern come from the material coming off of the knife onto the stone.
Reviews indicate that it takes about 20 passes to sharpen a dull blade, be it straight or serrated, with this little device. One note: The AccuSharp is only designed to work with 20-degree blades (the typical measurement for a Western-style kitchen knife) that are beveled on both sides. So it's not the right choice for 15-degree (Asian-style) knives or knives with a chisel edge that is only beveled on one side, which will rule out some serrated blades.

This is the interior set up of the Wicked Edge hard case. The Wicked Edge is actually upside down in the case with the base on top and the center vice going down into the foam of the case. Notice how well different stones are laid out in the case so you can arrange them in the order you want to make the sharpening progression easier. The different components also have specific cut-outs and the white box off the bottom left hand side is for the angle cube. In the top left there is a small spot for random stuff like a spare battery for the angle cube (trust me get a spare).


Honing steels are another story altogether. Honing steels are those instruments that look light a saber (light or otherwise) which you use to gussy up the edge of the blade periodically before using it. These do wear out every few years or less, depending on how often you use them. If you are unsure whether your honing steel is worn out run your finger around it. If it feels smooth all the way around then it’s time for a replacement. Not to worry though, they’re really affordable. One thing you may want to keep in mind about honing steels is that they typically won’t do much to hone the edge of some super hard knives, such as Japanese Global brand knives.

As for the drawbacks, there’s almost nothing bad about the Chef’s Choice 15 Trizor XV at all. It’s a solid candidate for the award of the best electric knife sharpener out there. Of course, if you’re nitpicky you may find the sharpener’s dimensions of 10 by 4.25 by 4.25 inches a bit larger than the norm. But that shouldn’t be a problem even if you have limited space in your kitchen. Besides, it looks good in either brushed metal or platinum finish.
Quickly and easily sharpen your knives prior to cutting food with this innovative chopping board design. It has a ceramic sharpener built into the surface that allows you to hone the quality of your blades just before you use them. A non-slip rubber edge ensures the board stays securely in place when sharpening. The board itself has a knife-friendly cutting surface that will protect the integrity of your knives and actually prolong the time between sharpening. 

A: Like cars, knife sharpeners run the gamut from basic to luxury and like cars the price can vary from extremely affordable to more than some people might want to spend. You can get a high quality sharpener that will put your knives through a 2 or 3-stage process which will result in an incredibly sharp edge for less than $20. Or you can buy a mechanical sharpener that will produce a virtually flawless edge for $200+.
Using Afterpay you can pay for your order over 4 equal fortnightly instalments. There's no interest or added fees*. Payment will be automatically taken from your debit or credit card in four equal payments each fortnight, and you will receive your order immediately. When using a promo code this must be applied to the order before continuing to the next step.
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