The Work Sharp Knife & Tool Sharpener is an innovative abrasive belt sharpening system. The combination of flexible premium abrasive belts and precision sharpening guides create the sharpest blades you've ever had with speed, ease and repeatability. The sharpening guides are purpose built for Kitchen Knives, Outdoor Knives (hunting knives, pocket knives, filet knives, etc.) as well as scissors and serrated knives. This tool can also be used for many other sharpening tasks such as garden pruners, lawn mower blades, shovels and countless other bladed shop and garden tools. This tool is assembled and quality tested in Ashland, Oregon and has a 1 year warranty. Includes a detailed Quick Start Guide and User's Guide.
These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
Although electric knife sharpeners don't provide as much control as manual sharpeners, they're faster and easier to use. In most cases, you pull the knife slowly through specially designed slots in the sharpener; abrasives hidden inside the slots do the sharpening. Electric knife sharpeners tend to be larger than manual models, so keep storage or counter space in mind.

I can honestly say that the sharpest knives that I have ever seen in my life were sharpened freehand. Knives beyond razor sharp, edges created by master sharpeners in Japan that have conquered any obstacle that prevents him from achieving near perfection in knife sharpening. I am not talking about the novice sharpener here. I am talking about someone who has done his/her homework, put in the hours of practice necessary.


I spent a few years trying out different sharpening systems from Grandpa’s old Arkansas Stones to a Lansky system but none of them really clicked with me and did not seem very intuitive, repeatable or all that accurate. Those few characteristics are important as each time you sharpen your knife it removes metal from the edge and thus eats into the overall service life of your valuable and often-times costly tool. Therefore it’s important that your sharpening is accurate and repeatable, removing as little material as physically possible to prolong the service life of your knife.
You will be given access to our useful online learning material: a set of videos and articles to help you improve your sharpening technique. These resources were made by professional knife sharpeners, specifically for beginners and intermediate sharpeners. The articles and videos will guide you and teach you knife sharpening from scratch, also covering more advanced techniques. You can also get in touch with us anytime if you have any questions concerning sharpening specific types knives.
Electric sharpeners are not small. They can range from about 6 inches long to over a foot long, and about 4-6 inches deep. They must be taken out and put away again. A stone or steel takes up inches in your drawer and can be taken out in an instant. It can seem like a chore to get the electric knife sharpener, plug it in, then put the machine away again. However, for me, that whole process is less cumbersome than using a manual method.
The angle at which you position the knife during sharpening is key, and it depends on what sort of knife you have. European/Western knives typically have a blade angle of 20 degrees, while Asian knives typically have a blade angle of 15 degrees, although many European knife makers have started introducing 15-degree blades as well. Most electric sharpeners have guides to help you maintain the blade at the correct angle, and some can accommodate multiple blade angles.
Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand.
One of the most well-regarded natural whetstones is the yellow-gray "Belgian Coticule", which has been legendary for the edge it can give to blades since Roman times, and has been quarried for centuries from the Ardennes. The slightly coarser and more plentiful "Belgian Blue" whetstone is found naturally with the yellow coticule in adjacent strata; hence two-sided whetstones are available, with a naturally occurring seam between the yellow and blue layers. These are highly prized for their natural elegance and beauty, and for providing both a fast-cutting surface for establishing a bevel and a finer surface for refining it. This stone is considered one of the finest for sharpening straight razors.[citation needed]

MULTIPLE USES: The stone can be used to sharpen all your kitchen knives as well as other tools around the house. Restore an edge to a pair of scissors or cutting shears for the garden. The 1000 grit is for establishing the proper cutting edge angle. The 6000 grit will bring the edge to razor sharp. Hone it with newspaper over the stone and you will be amazed.
The Lansky sharpening system is by far one of the best sharpeners for hunting pocket and survival knives on today’s market. It consists of 5 ceramic hones, which range from extra-coarse to extra fine grades. This will allow you to cover all levels of coarseness, so you can get a very fine edge. The stones are also color coded to eliminate mishaps and they are equipped with built-in finger grooves, which will increase safeness and decrease the risk of getting slashed.
Good article, but pull through sharpeners remove way too much material. Great for cheap knives but not so great for your good knives. Also, sharpening steels really don’t sharpen. As you use your knife the microscopic edge will bend and twist making the edge less sharp. A steel straightens that edge without removing material. You’ll often see butches and chefs using the steel a lot as they work. Keeps the edge sharp without wearing the knife down.
Turning my mind away from the fancy advertising gimmicks which had lured me to the sharpener that I almost selected for this position, I began looking closer at consumer ratings and reviews. Of all the manual knife sharpeners I found, all five included here on this page, the Sunrise Pro had, by far, the most positive consumer ratings. It’s hard to argue with people who have used this device in everyday settings and seen positive results.
A: You can sharpen your knives by hand using a stone or you can use a manual powered 1-stage, 2-stage or 3-stage sharpener or you can use a multi-stage electric powered sharpener. The choice is yours. Many people prefer not just the affordability but the precise control they have with an oil or water stone. While others opt for the more predictable results they get from an electric powered sharpener. It’s really a matter of taste.

Mospro knife sharpener has great qualities, and it has received positive reviews from people who have tried it. It has a comfortable handle and a non-slip cushion on the bottom that keeps it secured when placed on a surface. The knife sharpener is very easy to use. It comes in a material that makes it very durable hence providing excellent service to the user. The two stage coarse and fine sharpening system does not disappoint the user.


And that leads to its main drawbacks. The slurry can be quite messy (especially in the kitchen) and the water stones wear out quickly. And perhaps the Woodstock made a mistake in making the 1000 grit and the 6000 grit layers of equal thickness. That’s because the 1000 grit surface wears out faster. It would have been better of the 1000 grit layer was thicker.
The Kitchen IQ Edge is a very uniquely-designed manual sharpener. It has been created to sit on the edge of your countertop or any other flat surface featuring a 90-edge. In fact, it would be great for working atop a picnic table when you are camping. To grip the corner even better, the entire corner-catching edge has been lined with rubber. The rubber continues along the outer edges as well so that you can easily sit this sharpener on top of any flat surface. However, if you choose to do so I must advise you to be careful not to let the tip touch the countertop when you do. Unlike some of the others on our list, this one sharpener will not sit very high up off of the counter and, thus, will not give you much clearance.
After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
PRECISION SHARPENING GUIDES - provide fast, easy, repeatable & consistent results. Interchangeable sharpening guides to establish precise cutting angles for your knives. Kitchen, filet, & other precision blades use 40° guide. Heavier duty knives such as hunting knives, outdoor knives, & most pocket knives use 50° guide, & includes a 65° guide for sharpening common household scissors, & a guide for sharpening single-sided serrations.
Over the course of two days I re-sharpened nearly a dozen old blades, including removing the secondary bevel on an old stainless Ontario saber-grind Navy diver's knife, convexing the edge on flat ground 1095 Schrade 55 that also came with a secondary bevel, and fixing a broken tip on an old Kershaw folder. These stones made quick work of the Schrade and Kershaw. Both had completely new edge geometry within 30 minutes apiece. The Kershaw looked like-new, as if the tip had never broken. And the Schrade cut much better than it's secondary bevel would previously allow, regardless of how sharp I got it with a ceramic rod and strops. The Ontario took a little more work, as it had been abused a little the last time I'd held it, over 25 years ago and was as dull as a case knife - one of the reasons I decided to go ahead and do a full saber grind - well, a slightly convexed saber, I suppose would be more accurate. But within under an hour of using the two stones and a couple leather strops (one with black compound, another with green), the Ontario was shaving sharp again too.

★ MOST COMPLETE SET ON AMAZON – Our Sharpening Set is the only kit that comes with both a Flattening Stone and Angle Guide in addition to a Bonus E-Book (for sharpening tips and tricks) and Detailed Instruction Guide. Providing amazing value at a lower price than other sets. A Flattening Stone is a MUST have since all whetstones eventually become uneven and need to be flattened. This set completely eliminates the need to buy one later.
In many ways it is very similar to the Trizor 15. It has the advanced spring guide for more precise control of the sharpening angle, and which enables the sharpening of even cleavers and other thick knives. Again it offers the 3 stages of honing, with the diamond abrasives and the patented flexible stropping/polishing disks. It is also very suitable for the same type of knives: chef’s, Santoku, bread, hunting, pocket, and fillet knives. Again it can be used for straight edge and serrated knives, and for knives from Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

Method 1: Use an Electric Sharpener. Quality electric sharpeners are an option, but I strongly discourage their use. First off, they remove a tremendous amount of material from your edge. Sharpen your knife a dozen times, and you've lost a good half-centimeter of width, throwing it off balance, and rendering any blade with a bolster (i.e. most high-end forged blades) useless. Secondly, even the best models provide only an adequate edge. If you don't mind replacing your knives every few years and are happy with the edge they give you, they'll do the trick. But a much better choice is to...
Pull-through machine: A pull-through sharpener, also called a manual sharpener, works best with kitchen knives. You'll pull the knife blade through the sharpener, which includes guide slots with the sharpening agent inside. Some pull-through sharpeners allow you to adjust the angle of the blade, which helps with different types of knives. Some provide multiple guide slots, ranging from coarse to fine sharpening.
For this guide, we limited our focus to manual and electric sharpeners. Such models are by far the most popular choices for sharpening knives, and for good reason. When well-designed, manual and electric sharpeners are effective, extremely quick and easy to use, and durable. (By the same token, when poorly designed they’re cumbersome, flimsy, and ruinous to blades.)
In fact, I got this exclusively for family members who do not know or care about sharpening. When I must cook at my in-law’s house for holiday dinners, I bring this instead of my precious chef’s knives. In a few minutes, I can sharpen several of their criminally mistreated kitchen knives without fuss or mess. That makes me seem like a double hero. (both chef and sharpener)
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