© 2014 – 2018 The Kitchen Professor All rights reserved. The owner of this website, thekitchenprofessor.com, is a participant in the Amazon Services Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking the site Review to Amazon properties including amazon.com, endless.com, etc…
To reach ultimate sharpness on any knife edge, we will advice you to use Japanese water stones. However, there are also good reasons for us to offer you knife sharpeners in our web shop. There are several advantages to these sharpening systems. For one, they are very easy to use, which enables you to use them without having to master the art of sharpening in advance. The conduction of the knife automatically provides you with the correct angle; one of the most important elements of knife sharpening. The result of sharpening with a knife sharpener may not be as sharp as it could be when using a water stone. But our question is whether that sharpness is necessary with regular use of a kitchen knife. Our aim with this test is to answer this question.
If you are a hunting sportsman or an outdoor enthusiast, you definitely know how important your  pocket or hunting knife is to you because you use it for so many different tasks. This is why you will need the best knife sharpener for your pocket knives. The first decision that you will need to make is which type of sharpener you will need and this will be based on the type of knife that needs sharpening. The buck knife should never be sharpened with a power-driven grinding wheel, because it could damage or burn the blade’s temper. If this damage occurs, the edge will become very brittle and increase risks of chips and cracks.

It comes with 3 slots through which you can place and pull your pocket knife blades. First you have a 2-stage process to sharpen your straight edge blades. The stage 1 uses the Coarse slot, with diamond-coated disks specifically meant for damaged, dull, and excessively worn blades. Then the stage 2 uses the Fine slot, to give it that extra fine edge. In the middle slot, you have the fixed angle sharpener for serrated blades.
For multi-stage manual sharpening, we highly recommend the Spyderco 204MF Tri-Angle Sharpmaker System (Est. $70), which has held the top spot in this report for several years now. This sharpener has two sets of triangular rods -- miniature sharpening stones in fine and medium grits -- that fit into its plastic base at preset angles. You hold the knife horizontally, blade edge pointing down, then draw it back across the sharpening rods on first one side, then the other. An included DVD gives more detail on how to do this; the process is easy and simple once you see a visual example.
The toughest angle to master is the angle at which you'll sharpen the edge of the knife. For a Japanese knife, that should be around 12-15 degrees. Before you reach for the protractor, a good test is to get roughly half an index finger's gap between the spine of the knife and the stone (see above). Remember to remove your finger before you start sharpening. For a Western-style knife, you want an angle of about 20°, so raise it ever-so-slightly higher.
I've used ceramic rods, diamond plates, and leather strops for our sharpening needs. And, like most, I've tried a dozen little gimmicky sharpeners that, while some work, those that do often remove way too much material from the edge, making your blade wear down faster. I've also used oil stones, grinders and buffers for less meticulous sharpening of axes and such. These two stones from Unimi (600/1000 and 2000/6000) served as my introduction to whetstone sharpening. And I must say I like it. Though, I'm not sure of the need for investing in more expensive stones.
TO USE: Soak stone in water for no more than 5-10 minutes. Place stone on a damp cloth with the courser 400 grit side (dark green) facing up. Hold the knife so that it’s flat and perpendicular to the block, with the blade facing left. Holding the knife at a 20-degree angle, slowly sweep the edge of the blade from left to right down the length of the stone and continue until sharp. If stone starts to feel too dry, add more water. Be patient and take your time. Flip knife over and repeat on the other side (now moving from right to left). Be sure to sharpen both sides evenly. To polish the blade further, flip stone over to the fine 1000 grit side (light green) and repeat the process. When blade is honed to desired sharpness, wash and dry your knife. To clean your stone, simply rinse with water, wipe away any remaining metal residue with a rag, rinse again, then dry.

As with all motorized Chef ’s Choice sharpeners, the 702 will handle steel kitchen knives. However, it also will put the same quality edge on any ceramic kitchen blade. Employing advanced diamond abrasive technology, the 702 features two sharpening slots that hold the knives at pre-set angles, optimized for the best edge on both ceramic and steel blades. Turn the motor on and, using a steady drawing motion, pull the blade through each slot.
The Work Sharp Knife & Tool Sharpener is an innovative abrasive belt sharpening system. The combination of flexible premium abrasive belts and precision sharpening guides create the sharpest blades you've ever had with speed, ease and repeatability. The sharpening guides are purpose built for Kitchen Knives, Outdoor Knives (hunting knives, pocket knives, filet knives, etc.) as well as scissors and serrated knives. This tool can also be used for many other sharpening tasks such as garden pruners, lawn mower blades, shovels and countless other bladed shop and garden tools. This tool is assembled and quality tested in Ashland, Oregon and has a 1 year warranty. Includes a detailed Quick Start Guide and User's Guide.

This Messermeister rod is available in a 10-inch option and a 12-inch option, allowing you to select whichever suits you best. A general rule I like to follow in selecting a sharpening rod is to select one which is about the same size as my longest blade. As someone who’s longest blade is only 8 inches, I would select the 10-inch option. Most people will find themselves leaning toward that option, since bigger isn’t necessarily better. The rod needs only to be sufficiently long to allow you to sweep your knife down it without running out of rod before you reach the end of your knife. Anything too large will be difficult to control. Therefore, unless you are trying to sharpen a sword, I would advise against the longer option.


The Scanpan Knife Sharpener has taken the best qualities of tungsten, diamond and ceramic to create the perfect knife sharpener. The first tungsten edge restorer redefines the shape of the edge of your knife, creating a perfect blank to put a finer edge on. It will also remove any small nicks and burrs on your edge. The second diamond sharpener takes a little bit of metal off your knife, thinning the blade edge to lessen the resistance when cutting. The final ceramic sharpener polishes the edge in to the finest of edges making your knife ready for use. Once you have used this sharpener you will never go back to blunt knives again!
Sharpening by freehand takes time to learn and you need to manage your expectations, as long as your water stones are flat and decent quality you should be able to get a nice edge, soon. A small knife, such as a paring knife is actually a little trickier to sharpen in my opinion so start with an 8″ Chef knife of decent quality. You are probably not reaching the edge of the edge of your knife, and perhaps not raising a burr with the first stone. You need to raise a burr on both sides of the knife before it will get sharp. Paint the edge and bevel with a Sharpie and with gentle pressure try to remove that sharpie mark on the water stone, this will help you hit the target area and remove the fatigued metal. Feel free to email me but there are some good videos out there to guide you as well.

I love this whetstone pendant!! I’ve been wearing it a couple weeks now and this thing not only performs like a champ but looks really cool. I originally left a 3 Star review like a jerk because I didn’t like the fact that my stone was all white. Idve rathered some markings but after wearing and using this thing the markings are something I could really care less about. This piece is super functional, extremely well crafted and looks great as an edc sharpening stone/necklace!! You guys rock!!


The Trizor XV employs a three-stage sharpening and honing process using diamond-impregnated cutting wheels. The first time you sharpen a blade, you use the coarsest setting first to establish a completely new bevel. The fine wheels then form a secondary bevel, and finally the honing wheels polish the secondary bevel. The result is an arch-shaped edge that Chef’sChoice claims is more durable than a standard triangular edge. Thereafter, use of the honing wheels and an occasional pass on the fine wheels will keep the edge sharp for months or years before you need to cut an entirely new edge with the coarse wheels.

Heres why I wasn't impressed at first. I only used it for a few minutes on each side, which resulted in nothing. I watched a video online with a master chef using his stone, and he sharpened his knife for 10 minutes on each stone before moving up to a finer grit. I took this hint, and used sharpened my knife on each side of this stone for 10 minutes, which led to perfection.
We have been using this for just over four years, and wish more than anything I had known about them years ago. SO much faster and easier than the old whetstone and oil method, and a lot more efficient than the ceramic-type ones that I've tried - and, much less expensive than either of those. The blades are reversible, and then replaceable - easy, and inexpensive.

The diamond material is very durable and equipped with a metal plate that has tiny diamonds engraved in it, which may or may not contain surface holes. The diamonds with holes are more common and capable of sharpening the knife while the holes capture the swarf. This design is preferable because the swarf can decrease the effectiveness of the stone and prevent the blade from getting a precise sharpness. This feature will also offer the user a much quicker and more effective cut.
That's a great question — and one that's often left unanswered. First of all, sharpening and honing are two different activities. Before a blade becomes actually dull, first it loses its true. In this stage, the very edge of the knife actually becomes malleable and curls over slightly, hurting the knife's overall performance. When this happens, as it does to all knives during regular use, the correct solution is to use a honing rod.
The DMD double-sided bench stone sports two different grits: a coarse 400 and fine 1,000. The base is molded ABS plastic and features wide, anti-skid rubber feet to keep the sharpener in place while working on a flat table, counter or bench. The sharpening surface sits in a cavity of the base. To change grits, flip the hone over and return it to the base.

I recommend keeping two stones in your kit. One with a medium grit (around 800 or so) to perform major sharpening jobs, and one with a fine grit (at least 2,000) to tune the edge to a razor-sharp finish. For real pros, a stone with an ultra-fine grit (8,000 and above) will leave a mirror-like finish on your blade, but most cooks won't notice the difference in terms of cutting ability.

If you decide to use this device to sharpen a knife, you can simply attach the blade guide against the belt, creating a barrier against which you can lean your knife as you sharpen it. Leaning your knife against the guard holds it at a specific angle so that your blade can be sharpened to a specific angle. The angle is adjustable from 30 degrees down to 15 degrees. You can also choose to use this machine to sharpen tools, such as axes. If sharpening those types of blades, you will want to go with a freehand approach instead of using the guide.
What does this mean? Well, you are the only individual, who can determine the best knife sharpener for your own needs. Before attempting to choose, it is vital to know exactly how and how frequently you will be using this tool. Other specific parameters should also be taken into account. Below, you will find information that can help you form a solid foundation.
Shapton Glass 320, 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 16,000. I have the 4,000, and 8,000, they are absolutely fine, great in fact but I just don’t use them as much as the others. These stones excel on knives made of hard steel, the hardest steel is no match for these. This does not mean you can’t sharpen hard knives on the Naniwa brand of course, you can. I have been using this particular brand of stone for many years and I absolutely love them.
I purchased this set together with the 400/1000 grit stone assuming that some of my knives were quite dull and would need work on a coarse grit stone. Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 | Knife Sharpener Waterstone with NonSlip Rubber Base & Flattening Stone. This is my first wetstone. First off I tried to sharpen my Chicago Cutlery boning knife. This knife is nearly thirty years old, has been abused in may ways and was quite dull. It was very difficult for me to get a burr on this blade, which I attribute to poor technique. Next I moved on to my Henckels Professional S paring and chef's knives. The paring knife was moderately sharp and was modestly improved after working over all three grits of stone. It would cut paper but again it was difficult to develop a burr with this blade. Undaunted I switched to the chef's knife. This knife is twenty years old and has never been professionally re-sharpened. I have sharpened it twice with a Lanksey sharpening system which marred the finish but did put a good edge on the blade. Lansky Standard Coarse Sharpening System with Fine Hones. The chef's knife was moderately dull and had several pits visible on the cutting surface. I modified my technique for passing the knife over the stone and worked the chef's knife over the 400 grit stone aggressively and eventually I was able to get a burr to form from the tip of the knife all the way to the handle. From there it was a simple process of reforming the burr on the 1000 grit stone and then finishing on the 6000. After sharpening, the chef's knife easily and cleanly slices a tomato with very light pressure and is in my opinion very sharp. Not sushi knife sharp but more than enough for the chopping and slicing I expect of it. I'm looking forward to going back and working both the boning knife and the paring knife over again. Don't expect a good result from this product the first time you use it. Watch videos on using a wetstone, expect to spend at least twenty minutes per knife at first, and practice forming a burr. If you can form a burr, you will be able to successfully sharpen your knife.
The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.
This set of two Norton combination waterstones provides four grits and also includes a flattening stone as an added value. The 220, 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit sides will handle everything from aggressive shaping to final polishing. They are 8" long by 3" wide, big enough to handle most knives and tools easily. Our most popular waterstone kit, this has everything you need to both sharpen with waterstones and maintain the stones themselves. A great starter set.
Another feature is the Edge Grip Bottom. It has a 90-degree inverted V design that lets you rest the KitchenIQ 50009 on the edge of your kitchen table or counter top. This is a better way because in some instances when you use a smaller sharpener for a larger chef’s knife, you may end up dragging the tip of the knife across the countertop. This can damage your counter top and your knife too.

Sharpening on the other hand is reupholstering the furniture or telling the hair stylist to give you a new look. Material is going to be removed from the edge of the blade. There’s no way around it. How much is removed will be a function of just how dull the knife has become or whether you’re sharpening to compensate for a chip in the edge or because the tip has broken off. If your knife is not damaged and you have it sharpened twice a year very little material will be removed each time, yet it may still be enough for you to notice just by looking carefully with the naked eye.
A: Experienced professionals know exactly how sharp they want their knives to be and have an instinctive feel for when they’re just right and when they’re even a tiny bit off. Most folks, however, need to have some sort of objective test they can use to determine if in fact their best knife has been properly sharpened. There are a few simple ones you can use:
A manual pull-through sharpener looks similar to the electric machine, except that it has no motor. You sharpen your knives by placing them into the slots and pulling through with force. These manual sharpeners obviously cost less money, and inevitably more time and labor than the electric counterparts. However, they can still bring very satisfying results.
Sharpening on water stones is traditional, it carries with it a sense of pride. For me, I think of the men that I would like to talk the most in my life, those Master Sharpeners in Japan, those gentle and kind men that have dedicated their lives to sharpening knives, it goes back in history, it is a very special feeling being part of this. THIS is what drives me the most, yes the sharp knives are awesome but doing this with my bare hands, doing something my dad and his dad did, using a skill that I have spent years and years improving is a privilege. Coming from a person who sharpens knives every day for people, if I could only choose one method of sharpening knives it would be freehand, there is no question about that.
This pocket-sized tool sharpens knives using carbide sharpening blades, then gives the knife a smooth finish using ceramic blades. A diamond rod is used for honing knives or for sharpening serrated knives. This is a great tool to keep in the toolkit, the tackle box, or to carry along when camping. Since it’s small, your hands will be close to your sharp knife blades as you work, so you might want to save it for occasional use rather than for sharpening all of your kitchen knives on a regular basis.
This knife sharpening system comes with a firm grip, to ensure a fine finish. This device does not slip around when sharpening your knife. You just need to hold it firm and it will adhere to the surface. This ensures that you get the desired results. The carbide surface is optimized to handle any type of knife. It doesn’t matter how blunt or damaged it is, it will give you a fine edge, for precision cutting.
I'm a novice knife sharpener. I've had to unlearn what my grandpa taught me in order to use these. So far, I've had decent but mixed results. I've switched to my cheap 200/400-ish cheap tool stone from harbor freight for cutting a bevel when the blade has either been damaged or did not have a proper bevel. The 400/1000 grit stone in this kit is soft. Very soft. I have bowled it out several times. It makes keeping a steady angle difficult. But these stones at this price point are meant for learning, and for that they serve their purpose.
Many households can benefit tremendously, by owning an electric knife sharpener. Typically, these sharpeners are slightly expensive, but this isn’t the case with the Presto 08800. This particular sharpener is actually very affordable! It only weighs around 3 pounds, so it’s much lighter than other electric models. Many people will find this extremely beneficial, since it’ll allow them to transport the device and easily store it somewhere out of the way.
×