Oilstones, like the Norton whetstone, can be made out of natural or synthetic material like Novaculite, Aluminium Oxide, or Silicon Carbide. As per the name, oilstones require the use of oil as you sharpen your knife's blade. This type of stone is slower at sharpening or honing a blade and it can be messy and you need to always have some oil on hand but it creates a nice sharp edge and a beautiful polish.
You could bring your knives to a local knife sharpener, but why not do it yourself? Sharpening your knives is very easy when you use the tools from Knivesandtools. In addition, sharpening your knives is great fun because you will experience step by step what happens to your knife while you sharpen it. As such you will truly start to appreciate your razor-sharp knives. Taking care of your own knives is fun, useful and, above all, a piece of cake!

Sharpening knives becomes effortless and the technology in this electrical unit helps your knife stay sharper for longer. The Trizor XV is engineered by the reputable Edgecraft corporation that was established in 1985 with the sole purpose of creating high quality knife sharpeners. The brand crafts both manual and electrical knife sharpeners with impeccable quality.


Out of the box, the sharpener looks well built with top-notch fit and finish. It is quite boxy in appearance, with a pronounced slot running down the middle. Inside the slot sits multiple diamond-infused ceramic wheels that interlock and rotate counterclockwise in relation to each other in order to sharpen both sides of the edge simultaneously. The unit runs smoothly with minimal noise.
The fit and finish on this product is amazing. He stone is beautiful and clearly high quality and very well cut. It’s different features on even such a small stone are huge. The leather cord and it’s unique knot is incredible. This is absolutely part of my edc, something I am happy to wear all the time. It’s useful and looks great too. Couldn’t be more happy with it.
What about electric sharpeners, there are some expensive and well built machines out there that claim to sharpen knives. I have seen the edges off of these machines and I can agree that they have the ability to sharpen a knife. However, at what expense to the knife and also, do what degree of sharpness? I believe that there is a place for these, not in my world, but there are circumstances where they can come in handy. Let’s face it, there are people who need sharp knives at their workplace, sharp enough to get the job done, and they may not have any interest in the process just the results. At least they are doing sometime that stops them from using dull knives. It is also possible that people who run a knife through and electric grinder and are impressed with the result have never seen a truly sharp knife. I don’t think that the folks who use these devices believe that they are creating world class edges, they just need “sharp” and need it fast so why not. Yes, the machine is likely removing more metal than necessary but, in some cases, it can still work.
Keep your knives in top shape with our wide selection of handheld and countertop knife sharpeners. The best way to make your knives last longer is to sharpen them more often, and now you can do so quickly and conveniently in your own kitchen. Dual-stage slots help you get the perfect edge that you’re looking for, and the rubber grips make daily use easy and safe. A good knife sharpener refines the edge and bevels at just the right angle for your knives each and every time. Choose from our automatic or manual sharpeners to suit your needs. We also offer steel rods and sharpening stones for more traditional methods of knife-sharpening. Our professional-grade sharpeners are worth the extra care they can provide for your knives, and the three-stage and extra fine sharpeners will serve your ultra-sharp knives for filleting fish or fine-slicing best. You can also rely on the rubber feet on the bottom to prevent your sharpener from skidding or sliding on your countertop. Sharpen blades up to 10.5 inches in length down to knives that are under six inches. Do not use conventional sharpeners for blades with a serrated edge. After you’ve finished sharpening, check the edge’s quality by cutting into a sheet of paper.
“Purchased this knife sharpener a few months ago, and I am surprised about how well it works. I am a college student, so I don’t have the nicest knives, so they go dull pretty often. I run this thing over the blade a few times and BAM! It works like it was brand-new. This is very easy to use and lasts for quite a few sharpens … I sharpen the knives almost once a week due to them becoming dull so quickly, and I still haven’t replaced the metal inside. The shape of the handle is very nice and fits in the hand well for comfortable use. My mom has one of those electrical sharpeners, but I believe that this works just as well! Definitely would recommend if you have dull knives and are looking for a cheap way to get them sharpened.”
"Sharpening is like a hangover cure," says Laurie Timpson, founder of Savernake Knives in Wiltshire. "If there was a cure and you knew about it, I'd stay at your house, crash on your sofa and have whatever it was when I woke up. Everyone would have it and there'd be no discussion. Everybody says they've created a perfect sharpening technique, and they haven't." 

We bought this for our parents as a little random gift to have at their home. I suggest using it for your cheaper everyday knives. It sharpens really well! The only drawback is that my husband noticed that eventually it bent some a few of the cheapo knives. The knives were cheap, but this sharpener ended up damaging them (but still got them to be sharper). If you don't really care for the little dings and changes to a small portion of your knife, as we don't with our cheap ones, it's still worth using! I suggest to only use them on your more inexpensive knives because I'm not sure how I'd feel using them on more expensive knives, because you really don't want to damage those in case it does the same thing to them!
Oilstones, like the Norton whetstone, can be made out of natural or synthetic material like Novaculite, Aluminium Oxide, or Silicon Carbide. As per the name, oilstones require the use of oil as you sharpen your knife's blade. This type of stone is slower at sharpening or honing a blade and it can be messy and you need to always have some oil on hand but it creates a nice sharp edge and a beautiful polish.
When a whetstone is used to cut metal, it acts like sandpaper by removing small particles of metal (aka “swarf”) with each pass of the blade over the stone. Therefore, whetstones with more coarse grits cut faster than those with finer grits and, at the same time, soft whetstones cut faster than hard whetstones because each pass of the blade over both types of whetstones not only removes fine particles of metal from the blade, it also removes fine particles from the surface of the whetstone (aka “slurry”) which continuously exposes new cutting crystals. However, if the swarf is allowed to build up on the surface of the whetstone during sharpening, it will clog the stone and drastically diminish its effectiveness. Therefore, some whetstones require water to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf whereas, other whetstones require oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf.
To sharpen a blade in the Brød & Taylor, you situate the blade tip-down between the sharpener’s spring-loaded arms, press down slightly, and draw the length of the blade through the carbides. Within three or four passes, they remove metal shavings (pictured below) and produce a new, keen edge. You have to hold the blade steady throughout, but the tension that the spring-loaded arms put on the blade makes this task much easier. To hone, you tilt the tip upward and make six to eight passes. Then, to produce a final polished edge, you spread the arms to their widest point with your other hand and draw the blade through horizontally, allowing its weight to provide the only downward pressure. The whole process is simple to master and quick to accomplish—less than a minute.
After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
Additional information for residents of Quebec only: The regular annual rate for persons applying for the Triangle credit card is 22.99% for cash transactions and related fees and 19.99% for all other charges. Some applicants may receive a higher or lower regular annual rate depending on a credit evaluation. The minimum payment is the sum of (a) interest and fees shown on your statement, (b) the greater of any amount past due or any balance over your credit limit, (c) the amount of any equal payments plan instalments then due, and (d) $10. Balances under $10 are due in full. For residents of Quebec, the period between the statement date and the due date for payment is 26 days. The billing period covered by each statement can be from 28-33 days. The Triangle Mastercard does not have an annual fee. Examples of borrowing costs (rounded to the nearest cent) assuming that all charges are purchases bearing interest at the regular annual rate of 19.99%, a 30 day month, no charges made on special payment plans and no other fees, additional payments or other changes are:
The DuoSharp Plus stones are nicely sized at 8” long by 2 5/8” wide and have two grits on each stone to maximize value. The Plus in the name refers to an area of continuous grit in the otherwise interrupted grit surface of the stone. This area is for sharpening edges with fine points that might be difficult on the interrupted surface. A coarse/fine DuoSharp Plus stone is a good single stone to start a sharpening toolkit.
“I have many European and Asian knives. This is the first and (only) sharpener that sharpens them all — and does it better. Before I would never trust any electric sharpener to handle my custom Asian, Global one-sided and handmade fillet knives. This works. It makes short work of the European Henckels of the ’60s and ’70s (better than new). I had held off for the cost and wasted a few years with my stones. I doubt any knife person could be disappointed.”
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.

Here is the most important part. Even if you don’t believe what I have said here you will believe this: Gadgets rob you of one of critical components of knife sharpening. With them, there is no connection between you and the knife, there is no sense of pride, no accomplishment. I was able to make knives sharp years ago, what propels me these days, what drives me to improve is the emotional feedback given to me by the entire sharpening process, this is not possible with a gadget and using one is like putting a piece of bread in the toaster. (not a good toaster either). Sharpening knives has a multitude of personal rewards attached to it, these are what you should strive for and hang on to. These are not part of the gadget world.


If you want to re-shape the edge on a knife that isn't set to a 15- or 20-degree angle, or restore a more damaged edge, the medium-grit rods that come with the Sharpmaker don't remove enough metal. Users have reported good results, however, with the Spyderco Diamond Triangle Pair (Est. $50), which are diamond rods for the Sharpmaker system. Of course, if a knife edge is severely damaged, you're usually better off sending it out to be re-shaped, but the Spyderco Sharpmaker can handle anything short of that, and is small and light enough to tuck easily in your pocket or a kitchen drawer.
Wicked Edge Sharpeners have won many awards in recent years, and for alternative high grade sharpening tools they are certainly a company to watch. Their accolades include, ‘Accessory of the Year’ for two years in a row at BLADE Show (2009 and 2010), and most recently Wicked Edge have claimed the Kitchen Innovations® 2014 Award for Best Professional Series Knife Sharpener.
The product has a 2-stage sharpening system, which ensures that all of your blades will be sharpened perfectly. Take note that this specific sharpener does not offer angles! It is only useable with straight edges! Still, the product is super easy to use, inexpensive and will sharpen your blades perfectly. With that, the product is definitely one of the best knife sharpeners for kitchen knives!
If you have already perused some of the knife review pages on this website, you have probably noticed that I usually select a “Best in Class”, “Best Value”, and Best something else for each Top Three Choices section. What I quickly noticed when working with these knife sharpeners was that it simply wouldn’t be possible to do such a thing. Each of these types of sharpeners is so different from the other types that I felt all deserved their very own “Best in Class” selections.

It has amazing features that make it the go-to product. These include triple action, professional results, and effectiveness. It works well on blunt knives that can be annoying making them very sharp in just minutes. The design of this knife sharpener makes it comfortable to use and able to complement any kitchen. This knife sharpener is very budget friendly due to the price that it comes in. It has three slots that perform different functions according to the blade that needs to be sharpened.
I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
But if the edge it produces isn’t the absolute best (that honor goes to the Trizor XV), why consider the Brød & Taylor? Two reasons. First, its footprint is small enough—4½ by 3½ inches in breadth and depth, and 6½ inches high—that you can keep it on the counter, meaning you’ll be more likely to hone your knives every time you use them, a good practice that too few people are disciplined enough to follow since it generally means pulling a knife steel out of a drawer or knife block. Second, this sharpener is so elegant to look at and so simple to employ that it almost encourages you to use it. Whether you respond accordingly is a matter of personal taste and dedication, of course, but knowing our readers, I’m sure at least a few value such things highly.
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