The company is to be commended for including links to instructional videos in the package. Those videos lay out clearly how to get the most from your Whetstone sharpener stone. Once you get up to speed you’ll likely enjoy the process and at the same time achieve professional quality results time and again. Sure, it’s not fancy and doesn’t have a sleek, chrome plated design but it works.
Honing is kind of like dusting the furniture while sharpening is more like reupholstering the furniture. Honing is purely a maintenance activity that should be regularly practiced to make sure the blade is clean and sharp as can be every time you use it. It’s easily done using a honing rod, a leather strop or a sharpening stone; as most stones have a side for sharpening and a side for honing. Honing is akin to trimming your hair to remove the split ends. It’s not a full on haircut. What it does is realign the tiny sharp protrusions along the edge of the blade that can be bent over with use, so that they stand more or less straight.
Few things are as annoying as a dull knife. Whether it's your pocket knife or chef's knife, you need them sharp and ready for action whenever you are. The frustration of chopping tomatoes that end up as mush or spending an hour hacking away at a thin tree branch can ruin your day and your mood. That's why Knife Depot offers such a wide variety of knife sharpeners. 
I’ve been sharpening knives since I was 9 or 10 years old, starting with a Browning pocket knife that I still carry. Later, working on a cattle ranch, I was at various times responsible for keeping the butcher’s knives and the boarding house’s kitchen knives in good working order using Arkansas oilstones. I’ve been cooking for myself for almost 20 years, and I’ve been keeping my trusty santoku shaving-sharp that whole time using Japanese waterstones (more on those in How we picked). So I appreciate a truly fine edge. But I’m also big on the Korean concept of koenchanayo (“that’s good enough”), and so for the past seven years I’ve also used an electric sharpener for my cheap, stamped-steel paring knives (which Wirecutter’s Lesley Stockton also loves) and for my expensive, forged heavy chef’s knife. In short: I’m not one of those knife geeks for whom nothing less than an atom-splitting edge is acceptable. The defining characteristic of a sharp knife is that it cuts neatly, easily, and safely in its intended tasks—and there’s more than one way to get an edge that sharp.
As opposed to water whetstones that require you to pre-soak the stone, the Norton oil stone is pre-filled with oil to save time and eliminate the need to pre-soak it prior to use and the lubricant stays on the surface during sharpening.  The oil also prevents metal from bonding with the abrasive surface by flushing away dislodged abrasive and metal chips.
Steeling helps maintain sharpness. This process realigns the edge, correcting for dulling causes such as a rolled edge. A sharpening steel is a type of hardened cylindrical rod used similarly to honing stones. For example, a butcher steel is a round file with the teeth running the long way, while a packer steel (used in the meat packer's industry) is a smooth, polished steel rod designed for straightening the turned edge of a knife,[7] and is also useful for burnishing a newly finished edge. Because steels have a small diameter they exert high local pressure, and therefore affect the knife metal when used with very little force. They are intended for mild steel knives that are steeled several times a day, but are not well suited for today's tougher and harder blade steels. Diamond steels are now available that have an industrial diamond coating and can remove blade metal as well as straighten, therefore used correctly they can re-profile a knife instead of just honing.
Our test of the Brød & Taylor turned a dull blade into one that effortlessly and cleanly sliced both tomatoes and paper. Due to the reputation of V-notch carbide sharpeners, however, I was concerned about the durability of the edge, so I did an additional test: I used the Brød & Taylor to sharpen my old pocketknife, which uses 440C steel, one of the earliest knife-worthy stainless alloys and one that more refined alloys have since surpassed. I then made 50 slices through a cardboard box, rehoned and repolished the knife (but did not resharpen it), and made 50 more slices. After all that, I was still able to slice a tomato and peel an apple without problem. That’s impressive: Cardboard is so tough on blade edges that knifesmiths use it as a kind of stress test.
“My husband has been asking for a sharpening stone for a while, and I finally chose this three-sided system for him. I like that it comes with a stand so you can concentrate on sharpening your blade rather than trying to hold onto one of those tiny little stones. I really like that it has three different grits of stones in one system. It’s easy to set up and use. I am pretty new to sharpening my own knives, and I think this is great. My husband has been sharpening his own knives his entire life and he loves it too!”

The Lansky sharpening system is by far one of the best sharpeners for hunting pocket and survival knives on today’s market. It consists of 5 ceramic hones, which range from extra-coarse to extra fine grades. This will allow you to cover all levels of coarseness, so you can get a very fine edge. The stones are also color coded to eliminate mishaps and they are equipped with built-in finger grooves, which will increase safeness and decrease the risk of getting slashed.
Of course, some of the better electric models, such as those from Presto, are very stylish and don’t need to be stowed away. Either way, these sharpeners are lightning fast and get the job completed quicker than the others. If you live a hectic lifestyle and don’t have time with the above sharpeners, the electric knife sharpeners from Chef’sChoice and Wusthof are definitely worth checking out! The easy of use and convenience are simply unparalleled. The only negative to these will ultimately be the increase in price.
“I bought this sharpener in 2014, it’s now 2018, and it’s still going strong. In fact, I just pulled out all of my straight-edged kitchen and dinner knives, and sharpened all of them. I have never had a problem with it; it is perfect for everything from my fillet knives to my cleaver. I try to keep up on sharpening my knives every now and then, so it’s usually only a few swipes on each side for ‘coarse’ side, and a few swipes on the right for the ‘fine’ side. I go slowly on the left, two to three seconds each swipe, and fast on the right, a second or so. Every time, I get a perfect, sharp edge, and depending on the quality of the knife, it lasts and lasts. It doesn’t take too much of the metal down either, just makes a lovely edge. This is one of my favorite purchases in my kitchen. I used to use manual sharpeners, but have long since thrown them away. Almost four years and still going strong. Excellent buy!”
The best knife sharpeners are easy to use and give your knives that desirable sharp edge. Because knife sharpeners exist in a variety of configurations, finding just the right type of knife sharpener for your needs requires a bit of sharp study. (Apologies for the bad pun.) Continue reading to learn more about this product area that will give your search for the best knife sharpener the proper edge! (We're really sorry.)
A: Experienced professionals know exactly how sharp they want their knives to be and have an instinctive feel for when they’re just right and when they’re even a tiny bit off. Most folks, however, need to have some sort of objective test they can use to determine if in fact their best knife has been properly sharpened. There are a few simple ones you can use:
Chefs will do this every day, and there's no reason you shouldn't too. Before cooking, or after you've done the washing up, honing your knife will help keep it in good condition. "When you're using a honing steel, you're not actually removing any metal at all, just re-straightening that edge, to get it back in line," says Authbert. Remember that you'll still need to sharpen it every two or three months. 

"How do I use this daunting metal rod?" I hear you ask. Well, it's not too hard, really. The best way for a beginner is to balance the steel on a surface with the tip secured by a damp tea towel. You want to get that angle right, whether it's around 15 degrees for a Japanese knife or 20 degrees on a German or French blade. Then swipe slowly down, away from you, making sure the whole blade is honed – around five swipes on each side should do. 
We bought this for our parents as a little random gift to have at their home. I suggest using it for your cheaper everyday knives. It sharpens really well! The only drawback is that my husband noticed that eventually it bent some a few of the cheapo knives. The knives were cheap, but this sharpener ended up damaging them (but still got them to be sharper). If you don't really care for the little dings and changes to a small portion of your knife, as we don't with our cheap ones, it's still worth using! I suggest to only use them on your more inexpensive knives because I'm not sure how I'd feel using them on more expensive knives, because you really don't want to damage those in case it does the same thing to them!
The cost of the most basic Wicked Edge package is about $300 plus $65 for a base to mount the system to (otherwise you’ll mount it directly to a table or bench). The basic package is great but if you can afford a little more I recommend getting the Pro-Pack II upgrade kit at $150 as that contains the micro adjustable arms shown in my run down of how to use the system. An Angle Cube is also a worthwhile investment generally running around $30 on Amazon. Finally, I would recommend getting the 600 / 1000 diamond stones and the 14 / 10-micron leather strops at a minimum. This would bring the total cost of the recommended kit to about $655 dollars. Yes, it’s a lot of money but if you’re serious about your knives it becomes a no-brainer.

The Work Sharp Knife & Tool Sharpener is an innovative abrasive belt sharpening system. The combination of flexible premium abrasive belts and precision sharpening guides create the sharpest blades you've ever had with speed, ease and repeatability. The sharpening guides are purpose built for Kitchen Knives, Outdoor Knives (hunting knives, pocket knives, filet knives, etc.) as well as scissors and serrated knives. This tool can also be used for many other sharpening tasks such as garden pruners, lawn mower blades, shovels and countless other bladed shop and garden tools. This tool is assembled and quality tested in Ashland, Oregon and has a 1 year warranty. Includes a detailed Quick Start Guide and User's Guide.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener is a handheld device, which is optimized to handle various sharpening jobs. It comes with a belt sander, which spins around following a triangular configuration. It has a set of angles on either side, which can be adjusted from 15 to 30 degrees, depending on your sharpening needs. Unlike other electric knife sharpeners, which tend to overheat during high speeds, the speed of this one is adjustable.
A sharp knife is a safe knife. If it's used to cut food, even sporadically, after some time, the blade will dull. This will then cause you to need unnecessary pressure and force to cut foods the blade used to glide right through. Although you can prolong your blade's sharpness by refraining from using it on glass or marble surfaces and cleaning and storing properly, it will require extra care at some point. Learn about the ways in which you can keep your cuts crisp, slices thin and your cutlery in tip top shape.
I had wanted a pair of sharpening stones for a while, so was enthused to get this last week. I watched a bunch of YouTube videos on how to use them and a deburring strop I also bought and wow, my kitchen and pocket knives are now wicked sharp. Pro tip: if you post anything about it on social media, family and friends will almost surely volunteer their knives for more practice...
Various Sharpening Angles – Each system will be equipped with different sharpening angles. Why is this important? This is absolutely vital, because a different angle will provide you with a different finished result. Depending on the specific edge that you’re trying to accomplish, you will need a precise angle. In the same sense, the exact type of knife that you’re sharpening will play a role here. Different knives require different angles, in order to achieve the sharpest edge. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the system you choose is equipped with a suitable range of useable angles.

Worksharp is a veteran in sharpening tools, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that your knives will be razor-sharp after the process (sharpening and honing). And, like many users have admitted, you will become obsessed with the sharpness and will start looking for and pulling out every kind of blade in and around the house to work on. It does serious sharpening, and is worth both the money and the time spent learning how to work with the little beast.

When attempting to choose a whetstone for sharpening your favorite knife, the number of choices can be mind boggling. In fact, sharpening stones are divided into four distinct categories consisting of natural whetstones and manufactured whetstones which, in turn, are divided into two other categories consisting of oil stones and water stones. Then, there are numerous different varieties of natural whetstones consisting of several different materials that are quarried from different places around the world as well as several different types of man-made whetstones!
1 Based on the level of net new purchases (purchases less credits) that are posted to your Gas Advantage Mastercard account in any monthly billing period, you will be entitled to a discount on each litre of gasoline or diesel fuel that is purchased for a motor vehicle at Canadian Tire Gas Bars during the following monthly billing period and that is charged to your Gas Advantage Mastercard. The discount that you receive in a billing period will be reduced to 2¢ per litre after you have made purchases of more than $500 for gasoline, diesel fuel or any other sundry items at Canadian Tire Gas Bars during that billing period using your Gas Advantage Mastercard. For complete program details please read the Canadian Tire Gas Advantage Mastercard Terms and conditions.
The first slot contains carbide blades which effortless shave your blade as you draw it through. The blades feature microscopic carbide particles which help them rough up the edges of the blade as it moves through to get an even deeper shave. The second sharpening slot contains two ceramic rods which work to hone your blade as you draw it through. They gently pull your blade into alignment and buff away the rough edge etched into it in the first stage. You can even choose to skip the first stage and use only the ceramic rods to hone your knife on a regular basis.

If you want to skip the learning curve entirely and save some money at the same time, one of the best knife sharpeners we found is also one of the cheapest. The design of the AccuSharp 001 Knife and Tool Sharpener (Est. $10) couldn't be simpler: It's nothing but a plastic handle with a slot containing a tiny, replaceable tungsten carbide sharpening surface. You place the knife to be sharpened on a table, blade up, and position the AccuSharp over the knife blade. Then you apply light pressure as you pull the AccuSharp along the length of the blade.
We used the honing rods on multiple knives, including our top pick for chef’s knives, the 8-inch Mac MTH-80—a hard Japanese blade—and a vintage 12-inch Wüsthof, a German knife with a softer blade. That covers the two main types of knives that people commonly own. To dull the knives between tests, we repeatedly sawed through 1-inch-thick hemp rope, a classic challenge used by knifemakers to demonstrate their blades’ durability. We focused on 12-inch rods, because a longer rod is easier to use—it offers more room to sweep the length of a standard 8- or 10-inch chef’s knife.
Also, when you use the strops bring in the guides two degrees to prevent an rolled edge as you have to remember the leather is soft so if you use the strops at the same angle you used the diamond and ceramic stones the soft leather will bend and conform to the apex of the edge actually deforming it. For example, if you sharpened the knife at 18 degrees per side bring the strops in to 16 degrees per side to prevent a rolled edge.
You can even determine just how sharp your knife can be when you have your own knife sharpener. For a chopping blade, you may want to have a 45-degree angle on each side so you have enough mass to use for chopping. A fine slicing knife may have a 15-degree angle instead so it can slice through food with ease. You can also limit the sharpness for such food ingredients as very ripe tomatoes.
When a whetstone is used to cut metal, it acts like sandpaper by removing small particles of metal (aka “swarf”) with each pass of the blade over the stone. Therefore, whetstones with more coarse grits cut faster than those with finer grits and, at the same time, soft whetstones cut faster than hard whetstones because each pass of the blade over both types of whetstones not only removes fine particles of metal from the blade, it also removes fine particles from the surface of the whetstone (aka “slurry”) which continuously exposes new cutting crystals. However, if the swarf is allowed to build up on the surface of the whetstone during sharpening, it will clog the stone and drastically diminish its effectiveness. Therefore, some whetstones require water to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf whereas, other whetstones require oil to lubricate the stone and suspend the swarf.
The angle at which you position the knife during sharpening is key, and it depends on what sort of knife you have. European/Western knives typically have a blade angle of 20 degrees, while Asian knives typically have a blade angle of 15 degrees, although many European knife makers have started introducing 15-degree blades as well. Most electric sharpeners have guides to help you maintain the blade at the correct angle, and some can accommodate multiple blade angles.

If you want a manual knife sharpener that works like most electric sharpeners -- just pull the knife through the slot -- then our top pick is the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 (Est. $65) manual knife sharpener. This knife sharpener has three slots, each armed with diamond-abrasive grinding wheels, and can sharpen a 15 or 20-degree blade; slot one is for a 15-degree blade, while slot two is for a 20-degree blade, and slot three can polish either blade angle.
The ceramic stones really bring an edge out and set the stage for the leather strops. The 1200 / 1600 stones are the ones that do the most in my opinion as they refine the edge and allow it to take a nice mirror once the leather strops are applied. I use the super fine 1.4 / .6 micron ceramics to really polish and remove scratches from the diamond stones. The only downside is they are the most expensive stones at about $120 so unless you are very serious about a mirror edge you can skip these.

Sharpening kits or systems can be manual or electric. They tend to require more time and effort than other simple sharpeners, and you always have to pass a learning curve before you can properly sharpen your knives without causing damages on the blades. A good sharpening kit is totally worth it though: once you’ve mastered the technique, your blades can have even keener and sharper edges than when they’re fresh out of the factory.
You can even determine just how sharp your knife can be when you have your own knife sharpener. For a chopping blade, you may want to have a 45-degree angle on each side so you have enough mass to use for chopping. A fine slicing knife may have a 15-degree angle instead so it can slice through food with ease. You can also limit the sharpness for such food ingredients as very ripe tomatoes.

If you are a hunting sportsman or an outdoor enthusiast, you definitely know how important your  pocket or hunting knife is to you because you use it for so many different tasks. This is why you will need the best knife sharpener for your pocket knives. The first decision that you will need to make is which type of sharpener you will need and this will be based on the type of knife that needs sharpening. The buck knife should never be sharpened with a power-driven grinding wheel, because it could damage or burn the blade’s temper. If this damage occurs, the edge will become very brittle and increase risks of chips and cracks.


The Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener is distinctly different from our main picks, not just in its obviously unique form but also in the way it sharpens. Whereas the others grind a new edge with rotating wheels, the Brød & Taylor model carves one with stationary tungsten-carbide stones. Some of the cheapest and worst sharpeners employ a similar method, but the Brød & Taylor’s clever design and precise construction allow it to deviate from the norm. After quickly carving an impressively keen, even edge on a dull knife, with a simple tilt of the blade you can then hone and polish the edge on those same tungsten-carbide stones, obtaining a durably sharp knife. And because this sharpener is compact and handsome, it can live on your countertop, so you’ll be more likely to keep up with regular knife maintenance. It’s the clear choice for style hounds.
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