But this is not just for pocket knives. It’s not really a good idea to get a sharpener exclusively for a pocket knife, especially when you also cook and prepare your own food, or if you also use other knives for hunting and camping. You’ll want something that’s good for all those knives, and that’s the 50264. That’s one of its most compelling features—you can use it for just about all types of knives.

Here is the most important part. Even if you don’t believe what I have said here you will believe this: Gadgets rob you of one of critical components of knife sharpening. With them, there is no connection between you and the knife, there is no sense of pride, no accomplishment. I was able to make knives sharp years ago, what propels me these days, what drives me to improve is the emotional feedback given to me by the entire sharpening process, this is not possible with a gadget and using one is like putting a piece of bread in the toaster. (not a good toaster either). Sharpening knives has a multitude of personal rewards attached to it, these are what you should strive for and hang on to. These are not part of the gadget world.


As you continue to repeat strokes on the first time, eventually a tiny burr will form on the other side of the blade. To check for it, place the blade on your thumb, and pull it backwards. If the burr has formed, it should catch slightly on your thumb (with really fine grit stones, say 2000 or above, you won't feel this). This may take up to 30 or 40 strokes, and is the indication that you should switch and start sharpening the other side.

"Sharpening is like a hangover cure," says Laurie Timpson, founder of Savernake Knives in Wiltshire. "If there was a cure and you knew about it, I'd stay at your house, crash on your sofa and have whatever it was when I woke up. Everyone would have it and there'd be no discussion. Everybody says they've created a perfect sharpening technique, and they haven't." 
Ye olde tomato test - After you have sharpened using one of the above sharpeners grab a firm tomato and try to slice it. If the blade is properly sharpened it will slice through the skin with virtually no effort and without pushing the skin inward first. If the skin is able to fight back against the blade then your knives are not properly sharpened yet.
As for the drawbacks, there’s almost nothing bad about the Chef’s Choice 15 Trizor XV at all. It’s a solid candidate for the award of the best electric knife sharpener out there. Of course, if you’re nitpicky you may find the sharpener’s dimensions of 10 by 4.25 by 4.25 inches a bit larger than the norm. But that shouldn’t be a problem even if you have limited space in your kitchen. Besides, it looks good in either brushed metal or platinum finish.
To summarize, Shapton Glass 500, 1,000 and 2,000 is a good combination and if you would like to throw in the 4,000 grit stone in lieu of the 2,000 that is good as well. If your knives are very hard, ZDP 189 for example, this is a fantastic choice. (They are also excellent for tools, chisels etc. and they are the premier choice for many Straight Razor honers).

Are razor-sharp results key and are you willing to spend hours practicing and improving your skills? If you are we recommend using sharpening stones. With it you will, without a doubt, end up with a razor-sharp edge. If you are not in the mood to spend too much time sharpening your knives you could always try a pull-through sharpener or an electric sharpening machine. Or are you a fan of varying sharpening angles without having to guess? Why not check out our manual sharpening systems. For daily maintenance you could consider a sharpening or honing steel. With a good leather strop  you will, finally, give your knives that finishing touch: you will make them shine like never before.


In addition, the Chisora 1,000 is absolutely delightful when using it. Professional chefs and wood workers, have reported exemplary results. Unlike other stone sharpeners, these ones don’t need soaking in water. You only have to lubricate it, and you are ready to sharpen your knife. Once you start sharpening your blades with this stone, you will never choose any other product. They are that addictive.
“For my daily-use kitchen blades, this is the perfect stone! Not too coarse to destroy a blade’s edge, and also not too fine to not do anything. I’m not sharpening shaving razors, but after a few passes on the 1,000-grit side, many of my edges are sharper than they have ever been. This is a very nice size stone, and the rubber base works great keeping it in place. High-quality product, priced right, and shipped fast. Thank you!”
The Chef’s Choice 316 sharpener will restore your dull knives to professional sharpness. It’s a great, reliable, well-built kitchen appliance that requires no special knowledge or setup. The precision guides of the 2-stage system make sure the blade is firmly held at the correct angle so that optimal sharpening is realized with minimal fuss. Great for your Asian-style knives or those you’d like to endow with an Asian-type edge for some precision cutting.
With our sharpeners in hand, we went about putting them to work—meaning we needed a lot of dull knives. Those are in short supply in the Wirecutter test kitchen (Lesley keeps ’em sharp), so we borrowed some from coworkers and sacrificed a few of the test kitchen’s blades. To ensure truly, appallingly dull blades, we ground their edges repeatedly against a piece of concrete curbstone.
A: You can sharpen your knives by hand using a stone or you can use a manual powered 1-stage, 2-stage or 3-stage sharpener or you can use a multi-stage electric powered sharpener. The choice is yours. Many people prefer not just the affordability but the precise control they have with an oil or water stone. While others opt for the more predictable results they get from an electric powered sharpener. It’s really a matter of taste.
Water stones can also be made out of natural or synthetic materials and they are fast becoming the most popular type of whetstone as they only require the use of water to lubricate the stone. They are not as messy to work with as an oil stone and deliver fast sharpening results but for even better results, soak the stone in water for 5 or 10 minutes.
We bought this for our parents as a little random gift to have at their home. I suggest using it for your cheaper everyday knives. It sharpens really well! The only drawback is that my husband noticed that eventually it bent some a few of the cheapo knives. The knives were cheap, but this sharpener ended up damaging them (but still got them to be sharper). If you don't really care for the little dings and changes to a small portion of your knife, as we don't with our cheap ones, it's still worth using! I suggest to only use them on your more inexpensive knives because I'm not sure how I'd feel using them on more expensive knives, because you really don't want to damage those in case it does the same thing to them!
Jigs, such as the industry-standard Edge Pro, are an extension of the stone method, as they use simple but cleverly designed armatures to maintain a consistent angle between the stone and the blade. They’re extremely effective—professional knife sharpeners are some of their biggest champions—but they’re also expensive, and really practical only with a dedicated workbench.
When the block is intended for installation on a bench it is called a bench stone. Small, portable stones (commonly made of bonded abrasive) are called pocket stones. Being smaller, they are more portable than bench stones but present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and pressure when drawing the stone along larger blades. However, they still can form a good edge. Frequently, fine grained pocket stones are used for honing, especially "in the field". Despite being a homophone with wet in most dialects of modern English, whetstones do not need to be lubricated with oil or water, although it is very common to do so. Lubrication aids the cutting action and carries swarf away.
Therefore, the first step to choosing a whetstone is to determine your intended purpose and then choose your whetstone accordingly. For instance, when sharpening tools that do not require a fine edge, you should choose a relatively soft, coarse, stone such as a Norton Crystolon water stone. However, for sharpening tools that do require a fine edge, a somewhat harder Norton India oil stone would be a good choice. But, for sharpening hunting knives where an exceptionally fine edge is required, a Novaculite or Coticule oil stone would be the best but, most expensive, choice. So, the process of choosing the correct whetstone for any given purpose is to first determine how fast you would like for the stone to cut and how fine an edge you need, and then choose either a soft, coarse, stone or, a hard, fine, stone of the appropriate type and grit.

Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand.


Generally speaking, this type of knife sharpener is designed for someone with a little bit of experience in the craft of knife sharpening. To sharpen your blade, simply swipe it along the rough, textured surface in a sweeping motion, being sure to hold it at the proper angle. Holding it at the proper angle can be quite difficult. Despite looking very basic and simple, this is actually one of the more difficult types of manual knife sharpeners to use. That being said, with a little practice almost anyone can learn how to use it effectively.
This is the sharpener that finally got me to invest in a good knife sharpener. Every "automatic" sharpener like this, all the way to the $125 - $150 Chef's choice models (which I also own), make one fundamental error, which is they predetermine a set angle at which to sharpen a knife. They only have ONE angle when your knives all have very different cutting angles depending on the steel and purpose of the knife. The result is that this sharpener and all others like it, butcher up and ruin every knife that doesn't just happen to possess the exact same angle that they're created to sharpen. I ended up buying the KME knife sharpening system. Yes, it costs over $150 bucks and it takes more than 2 minutes to sharpen a knife - but nothing gives greater satisfaction than handing the chef in your house a perfectly sharp knife with an incredible edge that lasts. There are other good systems like the KME, including the Edge Pro, but after a couple of days watching various Youtube videos on a variety of these higher end systems, I went with the KME. When it comes to knife sharpening, quick and easy really does not work.
I recently placed my first order after finding you on the web while looking for grinding wheels. I am a customer for life. Here's why. My first order was a simple white grinding wheel for a "normal joe's shop". When I received the wrong wheel (150 grit instead of the ordered 100 grit) I called and without hesitation or the 3rd degree another wheel was sent off. No questioning of my integrity, intelligence or honor. Simply "I am sorry, we'll send the correct wheel off immediately..." The right thing was done by a neat guy. I was treated like an adult. Unbelievable in this day and age...proper...and priceless. Price, performance, responsiveness and customer service par excel-lance. 6-Stars! All my sharpening orders, albeit small shop orders, will now be with you. Promote you I will.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener is a handheld device, which is optimized to handle various sharpening jobs. It comes with a belt sander, which spins around following a triangular configuration. It has a set of angles on either side, which can be adjusted from 15 to 30 degrees, depending on your sharpening needs. Unlike other electric knife sharpeners, which tend to overheat during high speeds, the speed of this one is adjustable.
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