This is a good quality stone for a beginner looking to learn about hand sharpening knives and blades. It holds up well, especially for the price point. New sharpeners are prone to gouging and scratching stones, pushing too hard, etc, and this stone handles the abuse nicely. The no slip base is very effective at cementing the stone in place, which is a critical safety feature.
Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Sharpal 178N TRANSFORMAN 3-In-1 Diamond Round and Tapered Rod Sharpener makes it easy to sharpen all kinds of knives including those with serrations gut hooks fishhooks and pointed tools. Industrial monocrystalline diamond is electroplated in nickel onto a steel base. Sharpen dry. No messy oil needed. Fine 600 grit (25 ...  More + Product Details Close
When starting out sharpening, it won’t be long before you hear about the “toothy” vs “polished” edge. It will suffice to know that a 1k stone is going to give you an edge that will perform beautifully as will a knife finished at 5k. There is a belief that a knife that has a highly polished finish, 5k and up will be so polished that it’s toothy goodness will be erased. This knife will not bite into the skin of a tomato for example because the edge is too polished, it will slide over the top. This is not always true, if the knife has been sharpened well, i.e. if Side A and Side B of the blade meet precisely at the Apex of the knife, that edge will slide into a tomato quite beautifully. I have seen many brand new Japanese knives with highly polished 8k edges that no tomato skin can stand up to.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener is a handheld device, which is optimized to handle various sharpening jobs. It comes with a belt sander, which spins around following a triangular configuration. It has a set of angles on either side, which can be adjusted from 15 to 30 degrees, depending on your sharpening needs. Unlike other electric knife sharpeners, which tend to overheat during high speeds, the speed of this one is adjustable.
The humble sharpener tends to elicit more divergent opinions than just about any other type of kitchen tech. Everyone, it turns out, has their own take on which type of sharpener works best and why and most serious chefs aren’t shy about voicing their opinion. As you can imagine then there are a number of things most chefs – both professional and amateur – look for in a sharpener in order to ensure they get the one that’s right for them. These considerations include:
For multi-stage manual sharpening, we highly recommend the Spyderco 204MF Tri-Angle Sharpmaker System (Est. $70), which has held the top spot in this report for several years now. This sharpener has two sets of triangular rods -- miniature sharpening stones in fine and medium grits -- that fit into its plastic base at preset angles. You hold the knife horizontally, blade edge pointing down, then draw it back across the sharpening rods on first one side, then the other. An included DVD gives more detail on how to do this; the process is easy and simple once you see a visual example.
People often describe the Trizor XV as putting a 15-degree edge on a blade, but the reality is a bit more complex. It in fact produces what Chef’sChoice calls a Gothic Arch Edge, which consists of three distinct bevels, the final one at 15 degrees. Not surprisingly, the company claims that this “blade architecture” is more durable than a single bevel. More convincingly, the testers at Cook’s Illustrated and America’s Test Kitchen use the Trizor XV on all their knives and actually convert 20-degree knives to the Gothic Arch Edge. (Europe’s medieval cathedrals, too, attest to the strength and durability of the Gothic-arch form.)
This unit looks great, with its stainless steel construction material and soft touch accents. It also works well, but that shouldn’t be a surprise. After all, it’s manufactured by Smith’s Consumer Products, Inc. and they’ve been in the business since 1886. If you need to sharpen straight edge, double-beveled European and American style knives, this is a great option.​
A: You can sharpen your knives by hand using a stone or you can use a manual powered 1-stage, 2-stage or 3-stage sharpener or you can use a multi-stage electric powered sharpener. The choice is yours. Many people prefer not just the affordability but the precise control they have with an oil or water stone. While others opt for the more predictable results they get from an electric powered sharpener. It’s really a matter of taste.
I was prepared not to believe the reviews I'd seen for this before. I was so ready to try it out and be disappointed and feel like I wasted $9. Boy, was I wrong. I can't believe the difference a sharp knife really makes. The AccuSharp makes it so easy to get that perfect blade in seconds. Nothing to plug into the wall, no moving parts. Just a very straight-forward product that works exactly how you hope it would. There are instructions included for opening the tool and flipping the sharpening blades around. If, somehow, your sharpener gets dulled, you effectively get to double its life. Nowadays, this feels like getting two for the price of one.

If you’re a dedicated home chef, or if you simply demand the best possible edge that doesn’t involve messing with stones or jigs, we recommend the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV Sharpener. Cook’s Illustrated also names this professional-grade electric model as the top pick in the category, and I’ve used a similar model, the 1520, to great satisfaction on my heavy Wüsthof chef’s knife and cheap paring knives for six or seven years now. (The fact is, Chef’sChoice dominates the high-quality sharpener market.)
Contrary to popular belief, honing a blade is different than sharpening. Honing takes off very little, if any, of the material of the blade. All the steel does is recenter the blade, which loses its alignment after use, impairing cutting ability. To hone properly, hold the steel and the blade at arm's length. Run each side along the rod at a 20-degree angle, applying some pressure. Stroke each side several times, then try cutting a fruit or vegetable to test the improvements. Honing can be done much more frequently than sharpening and can even help prolong sharpness.
These are probably the most widely used sharpening tools in the world. The rods are fitted into a handle which you hold on top, while you set the rod’s tip on the table. Then you just glide the knife’s edge along the length of the rod to sharpen it. This will however need some sort of skill on your part, because the wrong angle will just deform your knife instead.
The Work Sharp WSKTS-KT Knife sharpener is the only sharpener on the market, which can handle every knife in your home. This device uses flexible abrasive belts, which enables it to sharpen different types of knives, from straight blades, curved knives, filet knives, tanto knives, gut hooks and serrated knives. Regardless of the shape of the blade, this sharpener is ready.
Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
Water stones can also be made out of natural or synthetic materials and they are fast becoming the most popular type of whetstone as they only require the use of water to lubricate the stone. They are not as messy to work with as an oil stone and deliver fast sharpening results but for even better results, soak the stone in water for 5 or 10 minutes.
A nearly foolproof manual sharpener that looks like modern art, the angle that the knife is inserted into the sharpener determines how aggressive the sharpening is (yes, there is a correct angle for sharpening your knives). You can start by sharpening the knife then hone it to a fine finish in the same slot. If the knife doesn’t need sharpening, you can use this for honing only. This sharpener self-adjusts, and sharpens the knife edge to its original angle, so you don’t need to know the edge angle to sharpen the knife correctly, and there’s nothing to adjust. The tungsten carbide sharpeners will last a long time, but can be replaced when necessary.

Overall, users say the Sharpmaker offers reliable, hard-to-beat results with a reasonable learning curve, and they're happy that, unlike traditional flat stones, you don't have to wet or oil the sharpening rods before use. They also say the Sharpmaker makes it easier to maintain a good angle than flat sharpening stones. Users warn that you do, however, need to scrub the stones periodically with an abrasive cleanser like Comet or Ajax to remove any lingering particles of steel. They also warn to be careful about not dragging the point of the knife across the stones as this will quickly dull it.
A: We’re all told that a sharp knife is safer than a dull knife yet most everyone knows that merely touching a sharp knife can often result in a painful cut while we can wrap our hand around a dull blade with little worry. So why would anyone in their right mind claim that a sharp one is safer than a dull one? To a certain extent it’s a matter of semantics for sure, because there is no denying you have to be extremely careful around really sharp knives. But at the same time there is a very good reason to consider a dull knife to be more of a safety hazard than a sharp knife.
“The Sharpmaker is easy to use, even for a beginner to sharpening, such as myself. Before purchasing the Sharpmaker, I got a sharpening stone as an introduction to sharpening. I failed miserably trying to get comfortable with the sharpening stone, since I was unable to utilize consistent angles of the blade when sharpening. In contrast, the Sharpmaker requires no guessing. You simply hold the knife perfectly straight and run the blade down the rods in the 40- or 30-degree setting. Easy and simple … Similar to how every household should have a set of tools and a first-aid kit, the Sharpmaker is necessary because there is no reason to have a dull knife lying around the house.”
Easily Replaceable Parts – When selecting one of these products, you will want to ensure that it is going to provide you with many years of use. In order for this to happen, you need to choose one that has replaceable sharpening pads that can be removed and changed easily! If the process is too complicated, you likely won’t do it and the investment will become a waste. Therefore, it should be easy to change for your convenience.
You've acquired a good chef's knife, you're using it almost daily to make tasty dinners for the family, and it's stored in a nice knife rack or a magnet for safekeeping. So why stop there? Keeping that knife's edge fine will make cooking not only safer but, let's face it, much more fun. Whether you've spent £150 on a high-end knife or under a tenner on a dinky paring knife, keeping it sharp is crucial. 
With our sharpeners in hand, we went about putting them to work—meaning we needed a lot of dull knives. Those are in short supply in the Wirecutter test kitchen (Lesley keeps ’em sharp), so we borrowed some from coworkers and sacrificed a few of the test kitchen’s blades. To ensure truly, appallingly dull blades, we ground their edges repeatedly against a piece of concrete curbstone.

These are unquestionably great starter stones. After all the sharpening done over the course of a couple days, they're still perfectly flat, showing little to no signs of wearing down. Mind you I did watch tons of how-to videos online before undergoing the endeavor, so I knew how to try to make the stone wear evenly. But, my 15 year old nephew who was working on the Ontario, as I told him he could have it, if he wanted to fix it up, didn't watch all those videos and I didn't see any uneven wear on his stone after working it about a half hour either.
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