The dual-sided whetstone is made from durable silicon carbide and has 400 grit on one side to sharpen the dullest blades and 1000 grit on the other side to create a nice smooth finish once the blade has been sharpened. The stone also forms a nice slurry that helps polish the blade for a superb shine. The stone is meant to be used with water, not oil and for best results, simply soak stone for 5-10 minutes before use, and lubricate with additional water as needed when sharpening.
Read on in the slides below to learn why the Chef's Choice Trizor XV is our top knife sharpener pick and why you should also consider the Brod & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener, the Edge Pro Apex 4, the Smith's TRI-6 Arkansas TRI-HONE Sharpening System, the Work Sharp Culinary M3 Manual Kitchen Knife Sharpener, the Smith's Edge Pro Adjustable, the Work Sharp WSKTS Knife & Tool Sharpener, the Linkyo Electric Knife Sharpener, and the Chef's Choice ProntoPro 4643 sharpener.
The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
Lastly, the stropping stage. Remember seeing old barber shops on television? Remember that leather paddle they used to buff the straight razor? That is stropping. The strop can be leather or canvas and it's the final step in polishing the blade, making an even surface. Depending on the use of the knife, this step may be omitted. A chef will not require the blade precision chopping vegetables that a barber requires shaving with a straight razor on a gentleman's face. The chef may simple steel the blade and keep working.
I do have to question the grit ratings of these stones. I didn't notice anything before using them, but after a day, the 2000 grit actually felt courser than the 1000 grit side of the other stone. Whether that could be a byproduct of other factors or an indication of the more obvious, being that the grit ratings aren't accurate, I don't know. But that seemed to be the main criticism of cheaper whetstones, that their grit ratings often aren't accurate. Or maybe it's less a problem with accuracy and more a difference that most synthetic stones might have in common when being compared to much pricier natural stones?

As you probably have guessed, knives are easier to sharpen on longer stones. The width of the stone is less important than the length when sharpening knives. The longer stone allows for longer sharpening strokes and contributes to faster sharpening. The longer strokes mean fewer strokes across your stone, making it easier to maintain a consistent sharpening angle. As a rule of thumb, a small knife can easily be sharpened on a large stone, but a large knife cannot easily be sharpened on a small stone.
MULTIPLE USES: The stone can be used to sharpen all your kitchen knives as well as other tools around the house. Restore an edge to a pair of scissors or cutting shears for the garden. The 1000 grit is for establishing the proper cutting edge angle. The 6000 grit will bring the edge to razor sharp. Hone it with newspaper over the stone and you will be amazed.
I bought this originally so I could tear it apart and review that it was nothing but a fanboy product. I got so tired of hearing how great it was from all the tacti-morons. Well, I'm eating those words, because it actually IS great. Learning curve is very small, and when you use the right belts for the right blade, and realize to let it do the work without forcing it to, it works very, very well. It puts an edge on a dull knife from 420C to D2, S30V and CPM154. It polishes that edge. It hones it. I strop it anyway, and it makes short work of sharpening. I love using stones, but I do that for a hobby mostly. If I want a fast and sharp edge, I have this thing ready to go now. You don't need the more expensive Ken Onion edition unless you have knives that fall out of the general category, the regular workshop will do fine. I've done outdoor knives up to and including a BK2 and small as a pocket folder. If you get the diamond belts, you can do ceramic knives as well and remove chips or hone the edges perfectly. Takes no skill to operate, but that's assuming general intelligence and the ability to read instructions.
I was prepared not to believe the reviews I'd seen for this before. I was so ready to try it out and be disappointed and feel like I wasted $9. Boy, was I wrong. I can't believe the difference a sharp knife really makes. The AccuSharp makes it so easy to get that perfect blade in seconds. Nothing to plug into the wall, no moving parts. Just a very straight-forward product that works exactly how you hope it would. There are instructions included for opening the tool and flipping the sharpening blades around. If, somehow, your sharpener gets dulled, you effectively get to double its life. Nowadays, this feels like getting two for the price of one.
✅[COMPREHENSIVE CHEF-QUALITY KNIFE SET] Suited for the home chef and professionals alike - presented in a beautiful acrylic stand. Elevate your culinary skills with this range of precision-engineered kitchen tools, ready to take your food creations to the next level. The Kitchen Precision 7 Piece Chef Knife Set includes five specialty blades and a two-stage sharpener to ensure your knives stay sharp for their lifetime.
When I bought my electric knife sharpener, I did some online research.  I told my sister about my purchase, and she said, “Why do you need one of those?” This from the woman who has a thousand-dollar sewing machine for her “quilted art.” I thought about her question. The truth is, I don’t need an electric knife sharpener, but the process that brought me to the decision to buy one led to only two options - pre-sliced vegetable and meat purchases, or buying an electric knife sharpener. It was that clear to me.

Some models can sharpen serrated knives but the economic models usually will not so be sure you check the manufacturers' documentation. Generally, you can touch up your serrated knives with great success by using to last or finest stage of an electric sharpener. To really sharpen each serration then you normally need around tapered sharpening rod, or you need a manual sharpening kit (like the Gatco 10005 or 10006).


After 15 hours of research and testing, and several adult lifetimes of kitchen experience, we recommend the manual Chef’sChoice ProntoPro 4643 as the best mechanical knife sharpener. It’s impressively simple—almost intuitive—to use: You run the blade back and forth between its diamond-impregnated sharpening wheels to cut and then hone a new edge. The ProntoPro 4643 works on both traditional European and Japanese knives, which use different edge angles, making it universally utilitarian. (Note that we also link to otherwise equivalent but cheaper single-angle sharpeners below.)
The Fallkniven DC3 Diamond/Ceramic Whetstone Sharpener will make a believer out of anyone willing to invest a bit of time in the process. A big advantage of this stone is that it can be taken anywhere, used anywhere, without any form of lubrication and will produce an amazing sharp edge on whatever needs sharpening. Timeless Old World tech that still dazzles.

So, we have the human component versus the human component using a sharpening system like the Edge Pro. Here is the question that I have asked myself a hundred times and undoubtedly this question has come up over and over in the multitude of sharpening forums… Given two identical knives, can a human make the knife as sharp as someone using the Edge Pro?
This rod features no abrasions. Instead, it features long grooves. This tells me that it has been made for honing, not sharpening. That is okay, though, because that is what most people look to a rod for – its honing ability. Unlike the Wusthof, which was awarded “Best Rod”, this Winware is not magnetic. That is also okay, though, since this rod is made strictly for honing and will not need to grip onto any metal shards, as no metal shards will be removed from the blade during the honing process.
The composition of the stone affects the sharpness of the blade (a finer grain, usually, though not always, produces sharper blades), as does the composition of the blade (some metals take and keep an edge better than others). For example, Western kitchen knives are usually made of softer steel and take an edge angle of 20–22°, while East Asian kitchen knives are traditionally of harder steel and take an edge angle of 15–18°. The Western-style kitchen knives are generally in the range of 52–58 on the Rockwell scale, which denotes the relative hardness of a material.
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I don’t believe I can say what is a better method of sharpening knives, at least not with an answer that covers all the bases. For me personally, I prefer to sharpen freehand, in fact 95% of my sharpening is done this way. It provides a more enjoyable experience, the fact that the knives are sharp is as I have repeated many times, is a piece of the process only. The essence of sharpening includes a blend of personal rewards that is quite unique and these only come from sharpening by freehand for me. They are as important to me as creating extremely sharp edges, without the joy that I experience sharpening every knife by hand, I doubt I would continue to sharpen knives professionally. So for me, a person who sharpen daily and absorbs in all the benefits the art of sharpening provides, it is hands down a freehand world. But what if you don’t sharpen knives everyday?
We can build muscle memory to an impressive extent. And in collaboration with other skills and human abilities such as patience, persistence, and above all: passion. we can achieve a surprising degree of precision when we sharpen a knife. Naturally there will be imperfections, we are not machines but those little imperfections may in fact create edges that surpass our expectations. As our experience grows and as we sharpen different knives, we adapt and manipulate the angle and pressure a minuscule amount to achieve what can be quite startling results.
Not sure why I bought this item and then I received it. It has a bit of a 'cool' factor and is well made. I took the sharp edges of the stone as they were a bit uncomfortable on my chest but have since been wearing it a lot. Used it to put an edge on some workmates knives and to tickle up my own daily use knife. I like it, it is a bit different and useful.
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