Method 2: Send it out to a professional. This is a good option, provided you have a good knife sharpener living nearby, and are willing to pay to have the services performed. If you plan to sharpen your blades a dozen or so times a year, as I do, this can get quite expensive. All but the best professionals also use a grinding stone that, again, will take away much more material than is necessary from your blade, reducing its lifespan. Want to forge a stronger relationship with your blade? Then you'll want to...
The manual knife sharpener is likely one of the easiest to use. Although the electric is easier, the pull-through sharpener is very close behind. The process is very simple, but it will still require two hands, in most cases. Grab the sharpener’s handle and hold it tightly to the table. While holding it securely, you will want to grab the handle of the knife and pull it through the sharpener. This process can be repeated, until the blade’s edge matches your requirements. Overall, the process is simple and can be completed within a matter of seconds.

Begin with your lower-grit stone. Place the heel of your knife on the far edge of the stone, holding the blade gently but firmly with both hands at a 15- to 20-degree angle. Using even pressure, slowly drag the knife over the stone toward you down the length of the stone while simultaneously moving the knife such that the contact point moves toward the tip of the blade.


This is a great sharpener for budget conscious cooks. You can use it with equal facility whether you’re right or left handed, it has a convenient finger guard to cut down on accidents and most important, it only takes a few swipes on a regular basis to keep your knives in tip-top condition. It’s not glamorous. It won’t add anything substantive to your kitchen decor. But it will ensure your knives are always ready for whatever dish you have in mind.
Knife sharpeners need to be able to create an exact angle on the knife's edge. American and European knife blades use a 20-degree angle out of the factory, as Chef's Choice explains, while Asian knife blades use a 15-degree angle. Hence, many people prefer a knife sharpening machine to a simple manual stone, because the machine helps guide you to maintain the proper angle on the blade.
Our only gripe about this sharpener is the terminology used in its documentation. When the Spyderco manual refers to a 40-degree knife edge, it's actually referencing what most knife-makers and manufacturers or sharpeners would call a 20-degree blade, the standard for Western kitchen knives. The reason for this disconnect is because Spyderco is measuring all the way across the blade, while most others measure just one side of the blade at a time. What Spyderco calls a 30-degree blade would typically be called a 15-degree blade, the standard for Asian kitchen knives, although some Western manufacturers are beginning to use this narrower blade angle as well.
However, because the Belgian Blue stone generally occurs in relatively wide columns with much thinner layers of Vielsalm Coticule on either side adjacent to the slate, the Belgian Blue stone is more plentiful that Coticule and thus, it’s somewhat less expensive. But, it’s also somewhat softer than Coticule and is not divided into different grades as Coticule is. Furthermore, because it is a softer stone than Coticule, it is sold without a substrate layer.
Various Sharpening Angles – Each system will be equipped with different sharpening angles. Why is this important? This is absolutely vital, because a different angle will provide you with a different finished result. Depending on the specific edge that you’re trying to accomplish, you will need a precise angle. In the same sense, the exact type of knife that you’re sharpening will play a role here. Different knives require different angles, in order to achieve the sharpest edge. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the system you choose is equipped with a suitable range of useable angles.
The Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener is distinctly different from our main picks, not just in its obviously unique form but also in the way it sharpens. Whereas the others grind a new edge with rotating wheels, the Brød & Taylor model carves one with stationary tungsten-carbide stones. Some of the cheapest and worst sharpeners employ a similar method, but the Brød & Taylor’s clever design and precise construction allow it to deviate from the norm. After quickly carving an impressively keen, even edge on a dull knife, with a simple tilt of the blade you can then hone and polish the edge on those same tungsten-carbide stones, obtaining a durably sharp knife. And because this sharpener is compact and handsome, it can live on your countertop, so you’ll be more likely to keep up with regular knife maintenance. It’s the clear choice for style hounds.
Our favorite way to sharpen a blade is to use a whetstone—a rectangular block that works almost like sandpaper, helping to straighten and refine the cutting edge on the blade as you slide the knife across it. Most whetstones are designed to be soaked in water before every use, so check the manufacturer's instructions to be sure. (Fun fact: Whetstones aren't actually named for the fact that most are used wet—"whet" is actually just an old word for "sharpen").
For chefs of all skill levels, it is absolutely vital to have a good sharpener in the kitchen. Of course, you need a specific type of sharpener with precise characteristics. You need one that works with your knives! It is also vital to choose one that works quickly and accurately. You don’t want to end up with a blade that has been deformed by the sharpener. Below, you will be able to find a breakdown of some of the very best kitchen knife sharpeners on the market. 
Removing the burr is fairly simple. You'll need a leather strop or block (this sort of thing), which is designed to catch the metal fibres from the knife. You could do it with a fibrous tea towel or some newspaper if you like, but I'd suggest going with leather to begin with. The motion is fairly similar to sharpening. Draw the knife over the leather, going away from the edge at roughly the same angle as when you sharpened. 
Another factor that launches Stage 2 ahead of a standard steel are those 2 handy guide slots for the left and right sides of your blade. These slots are perfectly angled to ensure proper contact between the blade edge and the miniature rod, and this in turn creates razor sharp micro-serrations. Trying to hit this sweet spot angle on your own takes tremendous skill, and if you miss by just a little bit all you’re doing is dulling the blade, or simply rubbing the face. So why not use Stage 2, eh?
Many households can benefit tremendously, by owning an electric knife sharpener. Typically, these sharpeners are slightly expensive, but this isn’t the case with the Presto 08800. This particular sharpener is actually very affordable! It only weighs around 3 pounds, so it’s much lighter than other electric models. Many people will find this extremely beneficial, since it’ll allow them to transport the device and easily store it somewhere out of the way.
“I bought this sharpener in 2014, it’s now 2018, and it’s still going strong. In fact, I just pulled out all of my straight-edged kitchen and dinner knives, and sharpened all of them. I have never had a problem with it; it is perfect for everything from my fillet knives to my cleaver. I try to keep up on sharpening my knives every now and then, so it’s usually only a few swipes on each side for ‘coarse’ side, and a few swipes on the right for the ‘fine’ side. I go slowly on the left, two to three seconds each swipe, and fast on the right, a second or so. Every time, I get a perfect, sharp edge, and depending on the quality of the knife, it lasts and lasts. It doesn’t take too much of the metal down either, just makes a lovely edge. This is one of my favorite purchases in my kitchen. I used to use manual sharpeners, but have long since thrown them away. Almost four years and still going strong. Excellent buy!”
The Chef’s Choice 476 2-Stage Sharpener transforms your weary kitchen, hunting and pocket knives into razor sharp cutting instruments with dependable ease. The sharpener is simple in concept, solid in its fabrication and reliable in the way it goes about its business. The design is also free of right-hand bias which is good news for the lefty chefs out there.
These are very popular stones. 8" Dia-Sharps have a single grit per stone making them more expensive, but at 8" by 3" they are wider than the 8" DuoSharps, offering a good working surface. The 8" Dia-Sharp line also has the widest range of grits available from DMT, with extra extra coarse, medium extra fine and extra extra fine options not available in other sizes, so it is good line to consider. One coarse and one fine stone is a good starting point.
Wicked Edge Sharpeners have won many awards in recent years, and for alternative high grade sharpening tools they are certainly a company to watch. Their accolades include, ‘Accessory of the Year’ for two years in a row at BLADE Show (2009 and 2010), and most recently Wicked Edge have claimed the Kitchen Innovations® 2014 Award for Best Professional Series Knife Sharpener.
Sharpening stones, sharpening systems, electric sharpening machines and sharpening steels: with sharpening products you keep your (kitchen)knives in great condition. After all, it doesn't matter how good the knife actually is, in time it will need to be sharpened. You can’t avoid it, over time each knife will become blunt when you use it. Little burs emerge on the blade making it broader which is something you will notice in the kitchen. Cutting will no longer be effortless and the slices won’t be as thin. Therefore we give you the following advice: sharpen your knives regularly.
The manual Brød & Taylor Professional Knife Sharpener was the most distinctive tool in our test. Unlike the rest of the models we tried, it employs the V-notch system in which you “carve” a new edge on sharpened tungsten-carbide stones. As noted above, typically you can find such systems in cheap one-step sharpeners that have a deserved reputation for removing too much metal from blades and producing wavy edges that cut poorly and dull quickly. And going into our test, we were skeptical. However, thanks to clever and precise engineering, the Brød & Taylor model produced an excellent edge. It allowed us to hone and polish that edge simply by changing the angle of the blade, producing a sharp, even, stable, and durable edge that nearly matched that from our upgrade pick, the Chef’sChoice Trizor XV.
The KitchenIQ 50009 is a manual knife sharpener, which means you don’t need to plug it in an electrical socket. They tend to be smaller, and they’re also more affordable. But they can give you extremely sharp beveled edges. For many traditionalists, only the best manual knife sharpener will suffice. And because it doesn’t need electricity and it’s small, you can also ring it with you when you’re outdoors camping, hiking, or hunting.
Knife sharpeners work by stripping away metal to form new bevels, ideally at an angle that closely matches the original. But you don’t need to obsess over getting the angle exactly right. For most kitchen knives, consistency trumps precision, says David Marks, a professional knife sharpener and owner of Stoddard’s, a Boston cutlery store and sharpening service: “As long as you keep the same angle throughout the process, it doesn’t matter if you’re off by a couple of degrees from the original angle.” Since consistency is key, many knife sharpeners incorporate some means of setting the angle for you.
Because the AccuSharp doesn't have multiple sharpening surfaces to choose from, the amount of pressure you apply is the only way of adjusting its abrasion level. In fact, a few users warn that if you apply too much pressure, this little sharpener will take too much metal off and can even nick the knife blade -- so use a light touch. Overall, users love its compact size, price tag and ease of use, and say they feel perfectly safe once they get used to it.
When the block is intended for installation on a bench it is called a bench stone. Small, portable stones (commonly made of bonded abrasive) are called pocket stones. Being smaller, they are more portable than bench stones but present difficulty in maintaining a consistent angle and pressure when drawing the stone along larger blades. However, they still can form a good edge. Frequently, fine grained pocket stones are used for honing, especially "in the field". Despite being a homophone with wet in most dialects of modern English, whetstones do not need to be lubricated with oil or water, although it is very common to do so. Lubrication aids the cutting action and carries swarf away.
I am new to sharpening my own blades using a whetstone but this product seems to do a pretty good job even considering my rudimentary technique. It is large enough to work well for a wide range of blade sizes and comes with a nice holder to keep it from moving while sharpening. I was able to get some pretty good edges so I would imagine someone with more experience using this type of product would be able to get some scary sharp edges using it. The only issue I had other than my own lack of skill was that the 1000 grit side seems to be wearing down fairly quickly. I don't know if this is normal or due to something I am doing but if this continues I don't see the stone lasting for many uses and I thought this would be a long lasting product. Again this may be due to user error so please take this with a grain of salt. Overall I think it's very capable and if long lasting an excellent tool for keeping all your blades sharp.
The final Chef’s Choice sharpener on our list is the 316 Diamond Sharpener. Like the 15XV the 316 is at its best when used to sharpen Asian-style knives and it does so with unflinching effectiveness and speed. This is a compact, 2-stage electric sharpener that produces the 15 degree edge so favored in Asian cutlery. Ideal for the preparation of sashimi or sushi.
Another benefit of the Wicked Edge system is that it has two sets of stones, one for each side of the knife. This allows both sides of the knife to be sharpened simultaneously unlike the Edge-Pro Apex and the Lansky systems. The stones that Wicked Edge utilizes are also diamond stones with the basic kits coming with 100, 200, 400, and 600 grit. The utilization of diamond stones allows even the toughest of steels to be sharpened relatively easily (it took me 25 minutes to sharpen a Spyderco ZDP-189 blade at 64.5 Rockwell!).
This is a great sharpener for budget conscious cooks. You can use it with equal facility whether you’re right or left handed, it has a convenient finger guard to cut down on accidents and most important, it only takes a few swipes on a regular basis to keep your knives in tip-top condition. It’s not glamorous. It won’t add anything substantive to your kitchen decor. But it will ensure your knives are always ready for whatever dish you have in mind.
In fact, I got this exclusively for family members who do not know or care about sharpening. When I must cook at my in-law’s house for holiday dinners, I bring this instead of my precious chef’s knives. In a few minutes, I can sharpen several of their criminally mistreated kitchen knives without fuss or mess. That makes me seem like a double hero. (both chef and sharpener)

Diamond whetstones, like the DMT Diamond Whetstone, are made out of industrial type diamonds which create a long-lasting hard, coarse and flat surface. A diamond whetstone is an excellent choice for when you are outdoors as you can use it dry or with a lubricant. It can take some time getting used to and the larger sized stone may not be ideal for working with small knives or cutting tools.
Then the Edge Pro is absolutely perfect. Now, since the majority of folks who sharpen knives sharpen their own knives mostly and some friends and family, the EdgePro is the way to go. You will get sharper knives than you may have ever used and you will get sharper knives as your skill with the system develops. You may get the same joy from using it as I do from sharpening freehand.
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